Canned "Recreational Oxygen" for elevation sickness?

Muddyboots

Well-Known Member
LRH Team Member
Joined
Feb 7, 2013
Messages
3,142
Location
Michigan
I wonder if one of those oxygen generators could help. I saw ad they are good up to 10,000' so question is battery life or recharge.
 

Coldfinger

Well-Known Member
LRH Team Member
Joined
Feb 20, 2020
Messages
1,059
Location
NY
Has anyone used one of the canned oxygen bottles that claim to have 90%+ pure oxygen inside as a way to help with elevation sickness? In my mind it might be useful after the sickness kicks in almost as a treatment, not prior to as a preventative measure.

I ask because i have an elk hunt this year around 7k, 7.5k' and I currently live at about 500'. The last time I was at 9k I had a pretty bad case and I had to be driven to a lower elevation cause I couldn't do it myself. I've never had problems at 6k, though. I'm thinking $20 or $30 is pretty cheap insurance if they are only slightly helpful.

Cause someone will probably mention it, I'm certainly not trying to find an easy replacement for being in shape. I've already started physical training and will be ready to go when the time comes!
While chatting with a rancher that allowed me to hunt his land in Co at approximately 7500 ft I told him I had a nasty headache for some reason. He ran to the kitchen and brought me a couple of bananas and watched me eat them and kept an eye on me for a bit. I’m from 1800 ft and was completely oblivious to elevation sickness, I thought it was just from the 27 hour drive. The following years he always asked if I brought bananas.
 

esshup

Well-Known Member
Joined
Mar 23, 2008
Messages
776
Location
N. Central Indiana
Stupid, silly question, but what about a pony bottle of O2 from a welding supply store? I use the "T" sized tanks to put O2 in water to trans port fish all the time, and go thru at least one "T" sized tank per 2 days when hauling fish. Np prescription needed like there would be for an O2 generator or a medical grade O2 bottle. The welding O2 tanks are available for rent.
 

joemcd2

New Member
Joined
Jun 17, 2021
Messages
2
Location
Tyler Texas
The whole point is to prevent it and getting to altitude 3 days in advance of your hunt has been scientifically proven to be huge step to prevent the possibility by allowing your body to Naturally Acclimate over the 3 day period. The average person takes 3 days to acclimate so why screw up a 5 day hunt with your body trying to acclimate while you are hunting? Not everybody can hit the ground running first day but this can help. Nothing can absolutely prevent it but the 3 day acclimation is the easiest step you can take to help prevent it.

If you show up out of shape, not much you can do period. If you have pre-existing health conditions the 3 day may help but again there may not be ANYTHING you can do under those circumstances.
I cycle between 4-5k miles a year on a road bike. Very much in tip too shape. Went to Breckinridge after Christmas this past year and got altitude sickness. Couldn’t get my O2 above 85%. I went through 6 of those cans of recreational oxygen a day. It would elevate my O2 levels to 90% for about 10-20 minutes and then would return back to 85%. After the 5th day I couldn’t take it any longer and went down to Denver the remainder of the trip. I regretted not bringing my aviation bottle that I use in our plane. Will never make that mistake again.
 

FEENIX

Well-Known Member
LRH Team Member
Joined
Dec 20, 2008
Messages
17,183
Location
Great Falls, MT
Feenix, what did it not help you with? Actual elevation sickness that you had to decrease elevation for, or some of the typical early pre-symptoms like light headed after climbing a hill?
I live at 3333' and hunt between 5-7K' so it is not an elevation issue or cardio/climbing issue. I just wanted to try it just in case. I use to work on aircraft for 10 years and used to take advantage of 100 % oxygen, I assure you Boost's claim is no where near.
 

ndking1126

Well-Known Member
Joined
Sep 12, 2010
Messages
425
I cycle between 4-5k miles a year on a road bike. Very much in tip too shape. Went to Breckinridge after Christmas this past year and got altitude sickness. Couldn’t get my O2 above 85%. I went through 6 of those cans of recreational oxygen a day. It would elevate my O2 levels to 90% for about 10-20 minutes and then would return back to 85%. After the 5th day I couldn’t take it any longer and went down to Denver the remainder of the trip. I regretted not bringing my aviation bottle that I use in our plane. Will never make that mistake again.
Thanks for the feedback. Very good input on using multiple cans. How many breathes do you think you got per can?
 

Mike Matteson

Well-Known Member
Joined
Jun 26, 2017
Messages
1,265
The whole point is to prevent it and getting to altitude 3 days in advance of your hunt has been scientifically proven to be huge step to prevent the possibility by allowing your body to Naturally Acclimate over the 3 day period. The average person takes 3 days to acclimate so why screw up a 5 day hunt with your body trying to acclimate while you are hunting? Not everybody can hit the ground running first day but this can help. Nothing can absolutely prevent it but the 3 day acclimation is the easiest step you can take to help prevent it.

If you show up out of shape, not much you can do period. If you have pre-existing health conditions the 3 day may help but again there may not be ANYTHING you can do under those circumstances.
It take longer than 3 days. It helps but it's more like 7 to 10 days, and a total of 6 weeks to be totally ready.
 

Wlfdg

Well-Known Member
LRH Team Member
Joined
Aug 28, 2008
Messages
663
Location
Teton County, WY
It take longer than 3 days. It helps but it's more like 7 to 10 days, and a total of 6 weeks to be totally ready.
Purely anecdote
I have a personal training client here in Teton County that has "lived" here for 6yrs.
She never spends more than a couple of weeks here before flying to a lower altitude for a week or more.
In 6yrs she still hasn't acclimatized.
 

riggingslinger

New Member
Joined
Apr 24, 2020
Messages
3
Location
Washington
I live near sea level and fly into most of the mountain airports in Colorado often. Telluride being the highest at 10,000. Portable OX will help a lot with improving eyesight since your eyes need a lot of oxygen to function properly and with mental alertness. Both very important during your hunt. The first few times I overnighted in KTEX I got intense headaches and could barely make the walk from my room to the lobby in the building next door. The local ski patrol told me the biggest problem people have there is dehydration. Since then I have started hydrating heavily before, during and after my trips to the mountains. It has helped a lot. I suggest using Ox for the eyes and brain and water for the body.
 
Top