Canned "Recreational Oxygen" for elevation sickness?

Muddyboots

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If you see someone in your hunting party come down with serious case of AMS and get taken off mountain such he didn't get to corral until after dark for transport to clinic you get really sensitive to what it can do to you. Gasping for air, severe migraine type headache, nausea, and couldn't raise head off cot. And this came on fast overnight the first night at altitude. I will say he told us recovery at clinic was fast and the night life in Durango is quite good that week. He never elaborated on that🤣. Guess AMS didn't have long term affects.
 

jessej

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My experience. Live at 100 feet above sea level. Hunt/camp at 11000 feet every September. Travel 1600 miles from home. First night is a hotel at 6k feet. Next morning buy supplies, then go up to 11k feet. We take the last 5000 foot ascent slow. ( 3-4 hours). We have done this for many years. I’ve saw 1 guy in our group get sick to the point of having to descend, he refused any treatment at camp. On every other occasion, at the beginning of symptoms, (headache nausea) medical oxygen through a cannulas for a hour or so straightened them out. I’ve also saw diamox help. I’m a big ole boy, not in great shape. I carry an oximeter in the mountains. When setting up camp, my levels will drop into the mid 80s. But I don’t feel bad. The reason is strictly a guess, but this is it. 3 of us in the hunting party are free divers. We never show any symptoms. All summer, we are in the water holding our breath while spearfishing. I think our bodies are conditioned to the lack of oxygen. What say you, doctors of the LRH forum?
 

willfrye027

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You have two ER docs with wilderness medicine experience on this thread.

both are recommending

1)acclimation—see previous post on the recommended intervals

2)consider Rx meds (diamox or steroids, both work but have different side effects to consider)

hydration is important as well.

Anything else is not established or proven to work.
 

tony d willIiams

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Has anyone used one of the canned oxygen bottles that claim to have 90%+ pure oxygen inside as a way to help with elevation sickness? In my mind it might be useful after the sickness kicks in almost as a treatment, not prior to as a preventative measure.

I ask because I have an elk hunt this year around 7k, 7.5k' and I currently live at about 500'. The last time I was at 9k I had a pretty bad case and I had to be driven to a lower elevation cause I couldn't do it myself. I've never had problems at 6k, though. I'm thinking $20 or $30 is pretty cheap insurance if they are only slightly helpful.

Cause someone will probably mention it, I'm certainly not trying to find an easy replacement for being in shape. I've already started physical training and will be ready to go when the time comes!
I have COPD. I am on O2, (Oxygen), 24/7. I also have migraines and other friends that won't leave.
We live in the mountains and we do enjoy the forests. When our altitude goes up by a couple thousand feet or more, I need to turn my lpm, Liter per Minutes, up 1 lpm, sometime more. That causes the headache, faintness and nausea to stop.
Our daughter gets altitude illness occasionally when we explore and picnic a few thousand feet higher. I give her my spare unit and I set it to 0.5 ~1.0 lpm. Not much, but enough to stop her illness. After a half hour or so, she does not need it anymore as she has become acclimated. We do live at a higher altitude so that helps.
We have a special needs son with seizures. With the doctors permission I give him O2 while he is recovering from a seizure. Comes back with a smile after a few short minutes.

The pulse O2 units make a click each time you inhale. If my abused elderly ears can hear it, I am sure the game can also. I use the full flow set at 2.0 ~ 3.5, occasionally 5.5 lpm, when I am out scouting or hunting. The animals don't seem to be bothered by it, and I can get close to them. Extra exercise also as I carry the tank.
 
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del2les

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As an FYI, not all AS symptoms, especially severe like HAPE and HACE, are simply O2 resolved, for the decreased pressure leading to leaking of vascular fluids can lead to more emergent concerns. Two severe forms of altitude illness occur less frequently but are more serious, and both can be life-threatening. If suspected, you need to descend immediately and receive medical treatment for these:

High-altitude pulmonary edema (HAPE) produces excess fluid on the lungs, causing breathlessness even when resting,and you feel very fatigued and weak and may feel like you’re suffocating.
High-altitude cerebral edema (HACE) involves excess fluid on the brain, causing brain swelling, and you may experience confusion, lack of coordination and possibly violent behavior.
 

ndking1126

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Once a thread goes beyond a certain point it's not about the OP any more.
Agreed! We all like to hear the sound of our own voice and like to impart our wisdom on others. Lol. It's all meant to be helpful I'm sure, and I do appreciate their inputs. Hopefully good comes of the thread. I couldn't find a single one here that discussed canned oxygen, so probably worth capturing input that others can search for later.
 

riggingslinger

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Dehydration in the biggest killer at high elevation. I have used portable oxygen and it will help a lot if you are properly hydrated. Drink a lot of water before, during and after your hunt. I overnight in Telluride a few times a year and have had good success with staying well hydrated. Even on day one and I live at sea level. . Got that tip from the ski pratol there. They pact out a lot of lowlanders every year that just don't drink enough water and end up on a IV drip.
 

evancox308

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Has anyone used one of the canned oxygen bottles that claim to have 90%+ pure oxygen inside as a way to help with elevation sickness? In my mind it might be useful after the sickness kicks in almost as a treatment, not prior to as a preventative measure.

I ask because i have an elk hunt this year around 7k, 7.5k' and I currently live at about 500'. The last time I was at 9k I had a pretty bad case and I had to be driven to a lower elevation cause I couldn't do it myself. I've never had problems at 6k, though. I'm thinking $20 or $30 is pretty cheap insurance if they are only slightly helpful.

Cause someone will probably mention it, I'm certainly not trying to find an easy replacement for being in shape. I've already started physical training and will be ready to go when the time comes!
I have to say I used to travel from Texas (1008) ft above sea level and hunt at 9-10,500+. I was a skeptic to the core about theses. My dad made us try one and it actually works! We all carry one now just in case we get winded or have an elevation headache. It really works. Now I live at 7,400 and when I go to 12-14k I still use them periodically!
 

DeanVosler

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Has anyone used one of the canned oxygen bottles that claim to have 90%+ pure oxygen inside as a way to help with elevation sickness? In my mind it might be useful after the sickness kicks in almost as a treatment, not prior to as a preventative measure.

I ask because i have an elk hunt this year around 7k, 7.5k' and I currently live at about 500'. The last time I was at 9k I had a pretty bad case and I had to be driven to a lower elevation cause I couldn't do it myself. I've never had problems at 6k, though. I'm thinking $20 or $30 is pretty cheap insurance if they are only slightly helpful.

Cause someone will probably mention it, I'm certainly not trying to find an easy replacement for being in shape. I've already started physical training and will be ready to go when the time comes!
Being in shape has nothing to do with hypoxia. Just take an aspirin a day stay hydrated and eat a lot of carbs. Or spend a week at lower altitude to adapt.
 

Laelkhunter

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If the canned oxygen might not prevent Altitude Sickness I wonder if the canned oxygen will help you recover faster (catch your breath) while climbing? You can get to the area a day or two early to acclimate, but it still will be hard to catch your breath when walking uphill. Maybe the canned 02 will help recover quicker?
 
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mulie

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AS DJ Morrison & riggingslinger O2 prescription from your primary care request 1.5 weeks worth. Arrive CO a day prior to going in the mountains, 3 days prior to hunting at altitude. Use the O2 at night to supplement your O2 while sleeping will help in daily recovery during your hunt. Begin to Hydrate yourself with effort 2 weeks prior to arrival and be conscious of keeping that hydration while your hunting. Dehydration here in CO can lead to many issues. I live in CO hunt elk at 9k.
 

Muddyboots

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One old school recommendation was to eat the biggest liver dinner before going up the mountain. Iron is another one of those elements that helps with O2 transfer. So I was in Pagosa Springs couple years back and stopped in this little cafe, the main entre was liver, bacon and onions. Asked waitress and she said it was pretty much sold out each night by 6:30 or so. Whether it helped or not who knows but dang it was delicious!

Its not canned O2 but hey seemed like O2 related!
 

Laelkhunter

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I have to say I used to travel from Texas (1008) ft above sea level and hunt at 9-10,500+. I was a skeptic to the core about theses. My dad made us try one and it actually works! We all carry one now just in case we get winded or have an elevation headache. It really works. Now I live at 7,400 and when I go to 12-14k I still use them periodically!

How many breaths can you usually get out of one can? Would it last for an entire (morning or afternoon) hunt, or would you have to carry several each day?
 
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