Canned "Recreational Oxygen" for elevation sickness?

Bob Wright

Well-Known Member
Joined
Jan 23, 2018
Messages
1,517
Location
Litchfield Park, Az.
I just put a meeting on my calendar on a day after the trip and copied the URL to this thread. As long as nothing pops up that keeps the trip from happening, I'll let you know!

There's just enough people saying they thought the canned oxygen helped that I'll probably take some and try it. Nothing to loose but a couple of bucks. I'll include my thoughts on it also.
Other than bulk, they weigh next to nothing. Grab some and find some room. You'll have something to try to mitigate anyway. Good luck.
 

FEENIX

Well-Known Member
LRH Team Member
Joined
Dec 20, 2008
Messages
17,047
Location
Great Falls, MT

KSB209

Well-Known Member
Joined
Sep 17, 2014
Messages
342
Location
Republic of California
Cant say I’ve never been on an over night hunting or camping trip with at least a little bit of alcohol but if the elevation gets to you stay away from it a week before and during. Drink a lot of water leading into the trip too. I’ve only had a problem one time and that was when I got over 13k feet. I was a lot younger and drank a lot more back then. The last 4-5 times since I have cut out all alcohol at least 3 days before and drink water. Have t had a problem since and I live at sea level.

if you go the medication route I would suggest trying it before you are on top of the mountain. I got something (don’t remember what it was) that I tried a couple weeks before a trip and It made me feel real weird and I would want to experience that in top of a mountain hours (or days) from help.
 

Bob Wright

Well-Known Member
Joined
Jan 23, 2018
Messages
1,517
Location
Litchfield Park, Az.
Cant say I’ve never been on an over night hunting or camping trip with at least a little bit of alcohol but if the elevation gets to you stay away from it a week before and during. Drink a lot of water leading into the trip too. I’ve only had a problem one time and that was when I got over 13k feet. I was a lot younger and drank a lot more back then. The last 4-5 times since I have cut out all alcohol at least 3 days before and drink water. Have t had a problem since and I live at sea level.

if you go the medication route I would suggest trying it before you are on top of the mountain. I got something (don’t remember what it was) that I tried a couple weeks before a trip and It made me feel real weird and I would want to experience that in top of a mountain hours (or days) from help.
Yes, lots of hydration. Lay low, and rest for any ascent. That's all the MD's told me. Bringing O2, a bit of reassurance.
 

david.eustache

Well-Known Member
Joined
Apr 7, 2021
Messages
67
Location
Michigan
Has anyone used one of the canned oxygen bottles that claim to have 90%+ pure oxygen inside as a way to help with elevation sickness? In my mind it might be useful after the sickness kicks in almost as a treatment, not prior to as a preventative measure.

I ask because i have an elk hunt this year around 7k, 7.5k' and I currently live at about 500'. The last time I was at 9k I had a pretty bad case and I had to be driven to a lower elevation cause I couldn't do it myself. I've never had problems at 6k, though. I'm thinking $20 or $30 is pretty cheap insurance if they are only slightly helpful.

Cause someone will probably mention it, I'm certainly not trying to find an easy replacement for being in shape. I've already started physical training and will be ready to go when the time comes!
I thought the same thing. Turned out I never needed it
 

david.eustache

Well-Known Member
Joined
Apr 7, 2021
Messages
67
Location
Michigan
Has anyone used one of the canned oxygen bottles that claim to have 90%+ pure oxygen inside as a way to help with elevation sickness? In my mind it might be useful after the sickness kicks in almost as a treatment, not prior to as a preventative measure.

I ask because i have an elk hunt this year around 7k, 7.5k' and I currently live at about 500'. The last time I was at 9k I had a pretty bad case and I had to be driven to a lower elevation cause I couldn't do it myself. I've never had problems at 6k, though. I'm thinking $20 or $30 is pretty cheap insurance if they are only slightly helpful.

Cause someone will probably mention it, I'm certainly not trying to find an easy replacement for being in shape. I've already started physical training and will be ready to go when the time comes!
I thought the same thing, turned out I never needed it
 

Muddyboots

Well-Known Member
LRH Team Member
Joined
Feb 7, 2013
Messages
3,000
Location
Michigan
The Wilderness Medical Society has a consensus paper on this (I don't know why their links come up as they do but they work) :

Great medical review and feasible options we can take. It was noted AMS at LOW RISK when a person acclimatizes >2 days at altitude which is by far the easiest to do plus we have control over it to a great degree.

It is a balancing act for a lot of hunters to manage time off with family and jobs which can be main driver of decisions on how many days can be allocated to a hunt. I did same thing when I was early in family and career. Later in career and son grown up, I used extra days to acclimate which older I got made incredible difference. I lost an opportunity at the biggest bull I ever saw 25+ years ago opening day because I had early stages of AMS and literally could not take deep breaths so I couldn't climb to reach him at all. Any movement caused intense coughing and gasping. I never had headaches or some of the other serious signs but I was clearly on cusp. I shut down for 2+ days resting in camp and wasn't to 2nd to last evening my breathing was fine. Holy cow is that tough to do to shut down but was wise decision. Hunted that evening and found good sign. Next day which was last day killed 5x5 there. Swore I will not hunt again unless I added acclimation. Since then altitude had been fine.
 

Unoboats

Well-Known Member
LRH Team Member
Joined
Jun 22, 2012
Messages
1,182
Location
North Carolina
I have used the canned O2 (unflavored, don't remember the brand) and it does work. Was hiking with a friend in CO and went from 8500' to 11,500' in about 2 hours. Don't know that I had alt. sickness but sure got queasy sitting at the top. A couple shots of O2 and a good lunch got me back in business. 😵
It worked for me to give me more o2 to climb. Not sure about the altitude sickness think arriving a couple days early to get acclimated.
 

WahooYahoo

Well-Known Member
LRH Team Member
Joined
Jan 27, 2016
Messages
451
Location
The Great Republic of Texas
If you are worried about altitude sickness I would go to your primary care physician and get a prescription for Prednisone or Acetalzolamide. Easy to carry, cheap, proven effective, and you can start taking them the morning of your hunt if your schedule does not allow you extra days to acclimate. Not worth losing a hunting opportunity because you got sick with something that was easily preventable.
Steroids will help a LOT. Also take supplemental iron for a couple of weeks before the hunt.
 

dbevins49

Member
Joined
May 8, 2012
Messages
12
Has anyone used one of the canned oxygen bottles that claim to have 90%+ pure oxygen inside as a way to help with elevation sickness? In my mind it might be useful after the sickness kicks in almost as a treatment, not prior to as a preventative measure.

I ask because i have an elk hunt this year around 7k, 7.5k' and I currently live at about 500'. The last time I was at 9k I had a pretty bad case and I had to be driven to a lower elevation cause I couldn't do it myself. I've never had problems at 6k, though. I'm thinking $20 or $30 is pretty cheap insurance if they are only slightly helpful.

Cause someone will probably mention it, I'm certainly not trying to find an easy replacement for being in shape. I've already started physical training and will be ready to go when the time comes!
I have 1 lung and use boost pink grapefruit. Hold your nose when you breathe in I do 2 or 3 shots and I'm good
The other flavors irritated my lung. Natural was ok but the mints. No.
 

340Wby-4-everything

Well-Known Member
Joined
May 1, 2012
Messages
151
Location
Denver area (Lakewood, CO)
Lots of good advice. Regardless of whether you get medicine to take with you or not, supplemental O2 will give you short bursts of relief and assistance so its worth carrying. As mentioned, it will not stop or prevent altitude sickness. Beyond that, the best advice I can give you is to drink all the water you can stand and when you hate it, drink another glass. Any form of the electrolyte drinks are also good for you here or anywhere you exceed 5k elevation or are heavily exerting yourself. I've hiked 21 of Colorado's 14ers and am an avid mtn biker and that is the same advice I follow (was given to me by an old retired Marine in Craig, Colorado about 30yrs ago) and I give anyone and everyone including family and friends who have come to CO to hunt over the yrs and it definitely has helped - we hunt from 8k to 11k. Keeping yourself well hydrated 100% of the time will prevent lots of problems. Coffee, caffeine and alcohol at altitude are not your friends. Wishing you a great hunt!
 
Top