CA Ridgeline vs Tikka T3x

Aled24

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Someone mentioned in a earlier post the importance of torquing the action screws to the correct ftlb’s, I can second this, I upgraded the standard stock to a GRS and my grouping went from .5 to 1MOA 😱
The problem was that I had torqued them to the standard stock speck.
On the GRS I had to torque them to 65 ftlb’s which is almost double the standard stock. It could be worth you playing around with the Torque settings ?
 

Teri Anne

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Torquing action screws is just as important as torquing scope mounts and for the same reason. I currently use the Vortex which only goes up to 50 inch pounds which is OK for most firearms work, but have also used the Wheeler FAT wrench. Both are excellent products and available both online and in major sporting goods outlets. Make sure that whatever you buy, as there are many out there take the standard 1/4 inch bits. Some do not. Shop around because prices vary widely.
 

skipglo

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I have no experience with the Tikka. But have a CA Ridgeline in 300wsm. There are some things about the CA also. Very short throat to work well with factory loads, Very tight specs, I've found that full length sizing works best @ sammi specs and coal. Very strong ejector springs that will leave light mark often when no pressure is there. So if you are a reloader there is not a lot you can do other than tweak powder and bullets. Good news is they are light, accurate and shoot very well with factory loads. I'm happy with mine and reload for it...but you just cant hot rod it, not made for that.
I found the CA action (bolt) very loose and sloppy when unlocked, so much so that it is the only gun I ever sold within weeks of buying it...2019. I can't stand rattles in a vehicle....but a rattling bolt fractured my small mind! Very poor workmanship!
 

Teri Anne

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All bolts are loose when open and will rattle. I never noticed a loose bolt on a Christensen rifle when closed. The only time when it's important that a bolt is solid is when it is locked and ready to fire. It doesn't matter the manufacturer unlocked bolt actions are loose when opened. If a loose open bolt bothers you then you should probably try a Browning Automatic Rifle. Its semi auto so the bolt is locked back in the action when the action is open so it can't rattle, besides that it's a darn nice rifle.
 

skipglo

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All bolts are loose when open and will rattle. I never noticed a loose bolt on a Christensen rifle when closed. The only time when it's important that a bolt is solid is when it is locked and ready to fire. It doesn't matter the manufacturer unlocked bolt actions are loose when opened. If a loose open bolt bothers you then you should probably try a Browning Automatic Rifle. Its semi auto so the bolt is locked back in the action when the action is open so it can't rattle, besides that it's a darn nice rifle.
Really....your expertise is amazing! Wasn't talking about loose open...loose closed when not wrapped around a shell in the chamber! I've been at this for 5 decades! As for BAR...yes a nice rifle....but not for me...I rely on accuracy...not volume!
 

Teri Anne

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debating likewise.... ive seen a good bit of issues with CA but it seems that they are more than willing to take care of things.... so that's actually not that bad... not to add more options but the xbolt hells canyon models look nice too (brothers shoots incredible in 6.5CM).
I have a problem when someone reports issues with any rifle, even if the manufacturer will readily take care of them. First of all, when does the issue rear it's ugly head? On the range sighting in, OK as long as there is time to send the rifle back to the manufacturer to get the issue taken care of before you need it for your dream hunt. However if that issue, whatever it is happens when you are sitting on a Ridgeline at 10 degrees and looking down on the buck or bull of your dreams and that is when the issue decides to rear it's ugly head that is when I have issues with the rifle and manufacturer. High priced firearms are not necessarily the answer to your dreams. Accurate ones are. I've always been able to out shoot almost everyone that I've shot against (Outside of competition where everything and everyone is fierce) and the most I have ever spent on a rifle is $900 (Optics not included) I've had a few, as I will call them disappointment rifles which simply would not shoot no matter what you did to them or how accurate the ammo was. The were not in my arsenal long. I do have to freely admit that the reason that I have been able to out shoot those with high priced rifles is simply because I use good ammo, either factory or hand loaded, I make sure my rifles shoot better than I can, and I take my time with each shot, which most other do not. The prices of my optics are typically in the $400 to $600 price range, all tactical and I know how to use them. Buying a $2000 rifle scope to put on a $300 rifle is not going to be the answer to your dreams, yet I see it a lot.

Moving on. If you delve into Browning's literature you will find a somewhat well hidden paragraph where they state that the AB3 uses the same barrels as the XBolt. If you check the actions they are the same too. The big difference as I see it and only as I see it is that the AB3 is about $600 less expensive than the XBolt. When I decided to experiment with another 300 WM I also decided to try something other than a Tikka, which I knew would shoot well. I selected the AB3. Since I previously had a 300 WM I was familiar with the massive recoil that came with that caliber rifle. Before I took my first shot with the 300 WM I had a muzzle brake installed, not just any muzzle brake but one that If I was shooting prone would not send gasses downward blowing grass and dirt into my eyes. It was a custom installation completed by America's Gunsmiths in Kenosha, Wisconsin. The results were phenomenal with the recoil of the AB3 in 300 WM is much lighter than even my Tikka 270 which is really comfortable to shoot. As an example for this, I also teach rifle and pistol marksmanship. I have a female student who is 5' 4" and maybe 120 pounds soaking wet that came out to the range early for her lesson. At the time I was playing with the AB3 and had enough rounds down range to where it where it had reduced the groups to about 1 MOA. As I finished up in preparation for her pistol lesson she asked, " Can I try that?" Meaning the 300 WM. I had some ammo left So I said sure, but keep in mind that this a a 300 Win Mag and it has a pretty good recoil. She wanted to try it anyway. I had a feminine recoil pad (1/4 inch dense rubber) that attaches to a bra strap in my car that I gave to her. She put it in place then took my place at the bench. I explained everything that she needed to know (first time shooting a rifle and first time shooting a scope) and adjusted the shooting rest and everything else to her diminutive body (compared to mine) fed a 165 gr Sig Sauer Elite round into the chamber and talked her through the first shot, which was 1 1/2 low and left from my zero. She did another shot with some coaching that was 1/4 inch to the left of the first. WOO HOO You go girl. The third and last shot, (all the ammo I had for the 300 at the time split the difference with almost all three not quite touching but less than 1 MOA. She was ecstatic, as was I. She said, My boyfriend will never believe this. At that point we went downrange to collect the rifle targets, hers was a previously unfired one so we took it back to the firing point where I entered the date, time and then signed it attesting to the fact that she had actually shot the group.

As could be expected her boyfriend was not impressed saying that she could not duplicate that and he could do better. So far the challenge taken, he has not opted to come to the range to try to beat her group. So far has not happened.

OK have to admit I get carried away but in my world is nobody to talk to about shooting that has any idea of what I am talking about. At least here I have a group of people who can relate to what I'm saying. We don't always agree, but then again who says we have to.
 

Tree Farmer

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I happened to purchase a CA Ridgeline in 300 WSM and handload 166 Hammer Hunters. It is capable of sub moa accuracy to 500 yds and a fine hunting rifle. There were a couple of things I tweaked to improve performance, but this is not a knock on the rifle. It took a bull at 480 yds as well as many other rifles in its price class.
 

Teri Anne

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Really....your expertise is amazing! Wasn't talking about loose open...loose closed when not wrapped around a shell in the chamber! I've been at this for 5 decades! As for BAR...yes a nice rifle....but not for me...I rely on accuracy...not volume!
Well then, what were you talking about? You and I are about the same when it comes to decades but I still don't understand what your issue is? Bolt rattle?? Exactly what do you mean?
 

skipglo

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FYI-my bolt locks like bank vault when closed.
Mine did not....more like...a piece of loose metal rolling down a back alley! Needless to say..problem is now solved...maybe mine was one in ten thousand...not looking for debate...just stating what was!
 

Teri Anne

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OK, no debate needed. Sometimes what it is, is exactly...what is is. No need to dwell on an issue that has been corrected. To be honest I have had more issues with new motor vehicles than I ever have had with a rifle, and I've owned a lot of both over the past 74 years.
 

DartonJager

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Own two Tikka T3 Lights one bought NIB in 300wsm one bought used in 6.5x55. Both are 100yrd one holers.
Never noticed the recoil all that much from my 300wsm T3 but then again 95% of my bolt rifles' are magnums and my slug guns are all 12ga and my inline ML is a smokeless Savage that launches a .451" 290 grain Barnes T-MZ and .458" 300grn Barnes SP Original at 2450fps/mv so recoil is a non factor to me.

Two friends of mine own T3's in 300wm and both are as accurate as Tikka promises.
My experience has been never seen a Tikka T3 that wasn't MOA or better at 100.

When one buys a very light rifle it is a given one must accept that there will be issues with increased recoil and they tend to require more practice to shoot well VS a rifle that weighs 2-2.5lbs more.
These issues are not for everyone. No doubt I had to learn how to shoot my T3 differently then fully dressed M700 in 338wm.
 

Teri Anne

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Own two Tikka T3 Lights one bought NIB in 300wsm one bought used in 6.5x55. Both are 100yrd one holers.
Never noticed the recoil all that much from my 300wsm T3 but then again 95% of my bolt rifles' are magnums and my slug guns are all 12ga and my inline ML is a smokeless Savage that launches a .451" 290 grain Barnes T-MZ and .458" 300grn Barnes SP Original at 2450fps/mv so recoil is a non factor to me.

Two friends of mine own T3's in 300wm and both are as accurate as Tikka promises.
My experience has been never seen a Tikka T3 that wasn't MOA or better at 100.

When one buys a very light rifle it is a given one must accept that there will be issues with increased recoil and they tend to require more practice to shoot well VS a rifle that weighs 2-2.5lbs more.
These issues are not for everyone. No doubt I had to learn how to shoot my T3 differently then fully dressed M700 in 338wm.
I have two Tikka T3's 30-06 and 270. I'm an accuracy nut and like to play and make firearms shoot less than 1 MOA. I have two Winchester Model 70's that I have had for years both shoot around 3/4 MOA or less depending upon the load. The Tikka's were no challenge, they both shot less than 1 MOA out of the box. Even the Tikka T1X .22 does less than 1 MOA out of the box. So when a friend wanted to get into long range shooting (only to 600 yards) I decided that maybe it was time to try the 300 WM again and play with 1000 yard target shooting again. Instead of a Tikka I bought a Browning AB3 Hunter with a 26 inch barrel. Having previously shot a 300 WM I was very aware of it's severe recoil. Before I even fired the rifle I sent it off and had a custom muzzle brake installed. The difference in recoil is simply amazing. My .270 has more recoil than the 300 WM. OK the purpose of this missive is simply to state that there is absolutely no reason to tolerate savage recoil and sore shoulders from the magnums, and if you think it's macho or something else to do that you are sadly mistaken. I don't care how tough one thinks they are once recoil gets to a certain point no matter how good a shot you are, your accuracy will deteriorate because believe it or not, you will be expecting to get your shoulder kicked back to your butt and no matter how much concentration you pay to ignoring the upcoming kick you will be unknowingly flinching. Another thing to keep in mind is your shoulder. Shoulders are wonderful things. They allow you to move your arms, hold your rifle securely and do amazing things on the range. However and think about this a lot...a shoulder is not designed to take a beating from the front going to the rear as in rifle/shotgun recoil. It will work real well and last a long time...that is...until...you beat it up too much by subjecting it to consistent blows from a direction it was not designed to take blows from. Remember Kinetic Action. Don't necessarily have to have the butt of the firearm on the shoulder joint to cause damage. Before you poo poo this stop and think about how many of your shooting buddies are having shoulder problems and surgery. If you are active in the shooting community and know a lot of different shooters then you might notice that a lot of us who are not exactly young anymore having shoulder issues...and surprisingly it's the shoulder that you hold your rifle or shotgun against. Between newer style recoil pads, stocks with different designs to help reduce recoil and especially muzzle brakes there is absolutely no need to beat up your shoulder to the point that surgery is needed. Wake up and smell the roses. You don't have to get beat up when shooting. Use technology as it is currently available to keep your body strong and not being beaten into submission.
 

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