Buying the right equipment the first time? Advise wanted!!!

Trickymissfit

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greenwood, IN
Shortpants,


You have gotten some of the best advice throughout this thread that I have seen in a long time! Some of the posters have offered differences of opinion but they have done so in a very friendly manner by offering reasons to there different opinions. I commend ALL that have posted. You all are offering your knowledge to someone that is just starting out, and to some of us who have been at it awhile are picking up tidbits of info also (at least I did).


Your last question is a good observation. I don't see how people load at a match without having charge weight issues. One of the posters stated that he didnt use the plastic shroud with his RCBS Chargemaster. I DO use the shroud with mine after being shown one of the reasons that the shroud is on there. It keeps the wind from blowing on the scale (it does make a difference). Without the shroud in place, the weight will be plus or minus the specific charge weight that I'm looking for. I still check the weight about every 5th or 6th round to make sure that everything is where it needs to be.

There is alot of great information about reloading on this forum, just remember, if you run into something that you don't KNOW to be fact or if something that is suggested seems unsafe... just ask. I am sure that someone can give you an opinion on the issue.

I load at the range more than I don't. I do use an electronic scale at the range when I feel it's needed, and other than the bright sunlight giving me trouble, I have little problems. Most stuff is small grained stuff so I throw it dead in the middle of the window I choose to work out of everytime. The long grained stuff is a pain in the rear for sure, but with a little thought it can be overcame.
gary
 

BlackKnight755

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Jun 30, 2010
Messages
217
I load at the range more than I don't. I do use an electronic scale at the range when I feel it's needed, and other than the bright sunlight giving me trouble, I have little problems. Most stuff is small grained stuff so I throw it dead in the middle of the window I choose to work out of everytime. The long grained stuff is a pain in the rear for sure, but with a little thought it can be overcame.
gary

I guess I may be too anal about keeping everything too clean and neat. Most of the ranges I go to are dusty as heck and I can only imagine getting my reloading stuff setup and someone coming over to BS and knock over a tray of my cleaned, primed and lubed cases in the dirt that I worked so hard to weight sort and put them in order... :D
 

Trickymissfit

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greenwood, IN
I guess I may be too anal about keeping everything too clean and neat. Most of the ranges I go to are dusty as heck and I can only imagine getting my reloading stuff setup and someone coming over to BS and knock over a tray of my cleaned, primed and lubed cases in the dirt that I worked so hard to weight sort and put them in order... :D

I only neck size at the range with Wilson dies. I do not use a wet case lube, and prefer powdered graphite. My scale resides in a box. As for cases, I never load more than twelve cases at a time, and usually do just five. I have a plate that has a vertical piece of aluminum attached to it. With this I can mount just about any tool or measurer I need in a 10" x 16" space. This plate is C-clamped to the otherside of the bench. Some ranges I goto, I use a Black & Decker Workmate, and with this it's even easier. I have two small cigar boxes for tools. One contains things like a set of hex keys and Torx keys, and various assorted tools I use to work on a gun. The other box is much larger (also a cigar box), and glued in several wood brackets and dividers. In it I will have my powder measurer clamped to one of the blocks plus just about everything else I need to reload a round (including the arbor press). I have one more box with bullets and powder in it along with whatever dies I'll need that day. If the range is not busy I often put my cleaning stuff on the next bench, and if it is busy I have to find a spot for it.

One of these days I'm gonna spring for one of the two wheeled tool carts, and then I only need to make two trips to the bench instead of four.
gary
 

TOM H

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Dec 24, 2001
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1,235
Another question for those of you who reload at the range. How on earth do you use a scale in the wind. I was told to turn off my ac and fan as the scales are so sensitive to air moving across them. Got me wondering how you guys do it???

I use one of the BR type click adjustment powder measure so I don't weight powder as I know what each click equals in grs of the powder I want to use.

When I first started back in the early 80's for my hunting rifles loading at the range I'd weight all my loads like you normally do but I didn't seat a bullet. When I got to the range and all set up I'd seat bullet with the Wilson die than fire and I'd take the fire case neck size seat primer them dump powder in from one case and if load didn't look good I'd move on to next test load. I had the whole range set up for my BR rifles at the time so adding was a big expensive . I had one of the Jones measure at the time then when Bruno started making his I got one and still have it.

With new lots of powder I check weight/clicks and sometimes depend on amount of powder I'll split that into 1/2 or 1/3 that gets it lot closer to actual powder weight I want to use.
 

Trickymissfit

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Messages
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Location
greenwood, IN
I use one of the BR type click adjustment powder measure so I don't weight powder as I know what each click equals in grs of the powder I want to use.

When I first started back in the early 80's for my hunting rifles loading at the range I'd weight all my loads like you normally do but I didn't seat a bullet. When I got to the range and all set up I'd seat bullet with the Wilson die than fire and I'd take the fire case neck size seat primer them dump powder in from one case and if load didn't look good I'd move on to next test load. I had the whole range set up for my BR rifles at the time so adding was a big expensive . I had one of the Jones measure at the time then when Bruno started making his I got one and still have it.

With new lots of powder I check weight/clicks and sometimes depend on amount of powder I'll split that into 1/2 or 1/3 that gets it lot closer to actual powder weight I want to use.

I keep a small log book to store my setups I use at the range. Once or twice a year I'll setup the measurer on a stand and weigh new powders (to me anyway) to get new starting loads, and start a new page for them in the book. I have another similar book that I actually keep load recipes in (bushing, seating depth, bullet, and primer and charge). I'm going to start a new book later in the year that will take in case brands and their volume.

I use a Harrell measurer, and it seems to repeat extremely well in my return trips to the range. I still find myself having to trickel powders in some of the more coarse grained stuff, but it's also the nature of the beast.
gary
 

BlackKnight755

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Joined
Jun 30, 2010
Messages
217
I only neck size at the range with Wilson dies. I do not use a wet case lube, and prefer powdered graphite. My scale resides in a box. As for cases, I never load more than twelve cases at a time, and usually do just five. I have a plate that has a vertical piece of aluminum attached to it. With this I can mount just about any tool or measurer I need in a 10" x 16" space. This plate is C-clamped to the otherside of the bench. Some ranges I goto, I use a Black & Decker Workmate, and with this it's even easier. I have two small cigar boxes for tools. One contains things like a set of hex keys and Torx keys, and various assorted tools I use to work on a gun. The other box is much larger (also a cigar box), and glued in several wood brackets and dividers. In it I will have my powder measurer clamped to one of the blocks plus just about everything else I need to reload a round (including the arbor press). I have one more box with bullets and powder in it along with whatever dies I'll need that day. If the range is not busy I often put my cleaning stuff on the next bench, and if it is busy I have to find a spot for it.

One of these days I'm gonna spring for one of the two wheeled tool carts, and then I only need to make two trips to the bench instead of four.
gary

Ok. I see how you make it work now. For me, I use wet lube and electronic scales (along with RCBS 10-10 to spot check the electronic scale weights) and other things that wouldnt work for me in an open air environment. Probably doesn't make my loads any better, just the way that I load them. I am thinking about going to a seat at the range setup where I seat the bullets long at home then seat them to the depth I need them to be at the day of the match on the range.
 

TOM H

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Joined
Dec 24, 2001
Messages
1,235
I keep a small log book to store my setups I use at the range. Once or twice a year I'll setup the measurer on a stand and weigh new powders (to me anyway) to get new starting loads, and start a new page for them in the book. I have another similar book that I actually keep load recipes in (bushing, seating depth, bullet, and primer and charge). I'm going to start a new book later in the year that will take in case brands and their volume.

I use a Harrell measurer, and it seems to repeat extremely well in my return trips to the range. I still find myself having to trickel powders in some of the more coarse grained stuff, but it's also the nature of the beast.
gary

I use index card at the range and if I make a change I'll mark that load with it. Once I get a seating depth that's it and if I want to try other bullets I'll get extra cap/stems for the Wilson. I keep a main file folder on each rifle from amt of rds fired to all test load and final loads and all loads I run over the chronograph. Over the years I've learned what's important to me vs what someone else may do in their logs saves getting into the debates.

At 70 my memory isn't all that great and I forget the company rights Bruno bought out for his powder measure it was someone on the west coast anyway it's been a good one.
 

Daveinjax

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Joined
May 21, 2012
Messages
506
Location
Jax Fl.
Midsouth Shooters suppply had the co-ax press back in stock tuesday. I get 90% of my supplies for them. Usually have the best price and ship same day most of the time. They are out of stock often but they get it back in quickly. Natchez supply is my other go to source.
 

Trickymissfit

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Joined
Jun 11, 2010
Messages
4,148
Location
greenwood, IN
Ok. I see how you make it work now. For me, I use wet lube and electronic scales (along with RCBS 10-10 to spot check the electronic scale weights) and other things that wouldnt work for me in an open air environment. Probably doesn't make my loads any better, just the way that I load them. I am thinking about going to a seat at the range setup where I seat the bullets long at home then seat them to the depth I need them to be at the day of the match on the range.


Honestly, I never like doing that (jamming bullets), but I also know a lot of people do it all the time. If I'm doing ball powders, I never bother to check the weight because I know it's there. Long grained stuff is a different ball game.
gary
 

Explorer1

Active Member
Joined
Dec 24, 2004
Messages
28
Get a catalog from Sinclair International (or spend some time on the web site) and you will find many of your answers. Hart is another source to consider if you are really serious about precision.

If you want a progressive metallic case loader, Dillon is the only option IMHO.
 

sp6x6

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Dec 8, 2009
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4,743
Location
NW MT
The Sinclair oal gauge is nice and more accurate than the Hornady,if you are using their generic size brass,not matching your chamber.I like their vld type chamferer also,it helped get my run out truer.
 

SidecarFlip

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Dec 12, 2011
Messages
4,442
Location
S.E. Michigan
Wait a second.....................:D

Read the thread title..."Buying the Right Equipment the First Time"........

The OP stated he was going to load one cartridge, a Winchester Short Mag. Here you are suggesting a complete reloading bench with all the gee-gaw stuff when all he needs to start out is a set of Lee Classic Dies, some primers and a bottle of powder.

Keep It Simple, learn the basics and progress from there. The Lee Classic will allow him to start reloading for under 50 bucks, powder and primers included.

I have a set in 223 and I use them at the range, right on the bench. A mallet and dies and you are good to go.....

Let him crawl before walking and walk before running. Bumping shoulders, trimming and headspacing comes later on....

If he wanted to step up a notch he could keep the mallet and get Wilson's.:)

Funny thing, I don't have an electronic scale or an automated powder dispenser, I have a good old beam scale and I weigh my charges. It's supposed to be relaxing and fun to reload not automated drudgery.
 

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