Bullet Lube

Turbo2160

Active Member
Joined
Oct 23, 2019
Messages
40
Location
Ab Canada
Just a cupple of quick question for anyone who has or still uses bullet lube.. what is your favorite? Any pro's or con's for using lube? Is lube advised for people that reload and let there rounds sit for months on end? Is there a noticable pressure drop when using lube? Is lube temp stable with your experience? Thanks for all you insite on this
 

codyadams

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Joined
Jan 7, 2015
Messages
2,473
Location
Southwest Wyoming
I use HBN on my long range rigs. After using it for a couple years, I have not seen any issues with inconsistency as long as you keep your process the same. If you change the way/amount of time/amount of HBN used, then yes you see some changes. The simple way to avoid that is to do it the same. I also try to coat my bullets in large lots to reduce any possibility of inconsistencies.

I had some rounds that had been stored about a year that I intentionally didn't coat, of the same caliber and same bullet in the same box with bullets that I did coat. Wanted to see if bullet weld was in fact an issue, and adjusted my die .050" deeper. Nearly all of the uncoated bullets had a loud "pop" when seated deeper, and the seating stem actually slightly dented the bullet, and they weren't consistently seated due to differences in how much the bullet was dented by the stem. To get the same CBTO, I would have had to slightly adjusted it for each individual round. All the HBN coated bullets seated deeper just like they were being newly seated in the case, and all seated to the same CBTO. That is exactly the reason why I started HBN coating, to keep consistency. Just make sure you don't store your ammo somewhere like in a truck or anywhere that it will be vibrating, it can cause the powder to break down and changes pressure significantly.

There is a significant pressure drop with the same charge from coating bullets, I usually have to add 1-2 grains in cartridges like a 6.5x284 up to 7mm rem mag to reach the same velocity, but I have noticed you can get around 20-50 fps more velocity prior to seeing the same pressure signs as with a naked bullet. That isn't much, and is not the reason I coat. Another thing I noticed, at least with the 147's in my .260ai and 180 VLD's in my cousins 7mm rem mag, was that it brought e.s.'s and s.d.'s down. Other guns I have used it in (.338 NM, .264 wm) have always used HBN, so I don't have a basis of comparison for them.

I have heard about it increasing barrel life, but there isn't really a scientific method to test this, as two different barrels made by the same manufacturer one after another may wear differently. However, I can see where it could due to a lower coefficient of friction in the barrel, though I don't know if that would be offset by the slightly higher powder charge that is needed to reach the same velocities.

My main reason for using it - shelf life of consistent ammunition, and increased consistency of said ammunition.

Also, not sure why but I don't see an option to vote on your poll.
 

David Emerson

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LRH Team Member
Joined
Jan 1, 2020
Messages
750
Location
Drayton,ND
Speaking of this bullet welding. Have any of you used or tried Hornady one shot resizing lube in your necks and let it dry before loading? And if yes what were your results?
 

Turbo2160

Active Member
Joined
Oct 23, 2019
Messages
40
Location
Ab Canada
I am a proud "one shot" guy.. have been using it since it has first came out here in Canada.. I have tryed multiple diffrent application with it from letting it set for a few min up to a month on the reloading bench.. I didnt notice any pressure or speed difference from letting the one shot dry on the brass.. this is one of the reasons why I asked the question on lube.. I have heard from the guys at gun range that "molly" your brass its night and day difference . I'm quiet confident that there may be more knowledge on this sit then my local 10 man gun rang..lol
 

David Emerson

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Joined
Jan 1, 2020
Messages
750
Location
Drayton,ND
From what I have read the HBN works well but it is a chore. I watched one video and wash and dry and put in the oven then coat. Seems like a chore. Seems to me the one shot would just be so easy and if it works. Sure works for sizing when you get a little inside the neck but I have no idea if it would last. Why I am asking and it is very easy to do.
 

Orange Dust

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Joined
Oct 23, 2015
Messages
1,580
To me, lack of bullet weld is a benefit, not a reason for HBN. I use it for more consistent bullet pull which lowers ES., and cold bore accuracy. Those two are the driving factors for me, everything else it does I consider gravy. It is a lot of trouble, but the LR magnums I mostly use it in don't get shot all that much either. I think if I restarted shooting rifles competitively again, I would use it for that, but would farm out the coating. Tubb will coat them in lots of 1000 and he's reasonable.
 

J E Custom

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Joined
Jul 29, 2004
Messages
9,826
Location
Texas
I am one of the guys that believe that clean and dry is still the most consistent even though I can't prove that ether way one way is better than the other. I have shot 50+year old ammo and the zeros were still the same and group size was the same.

I have also shot a lot of military ammo that was asphalted/sealed and it shot well even though the bullets were stuck. It's like crimping or anything else there will be different opinions so go with what you like and be happy.

I want something that is consistent, So I prefer clean because there are no surprises
or changes over time.

Just my opinion

J E CUSTOM
 

codyadams

Well-Known Member
Joined
Jan 7, 2015
Messages
2,473
Location
Southwest Wyoming
Speaking of this bullet welding. Have any of you used or tried Hornady one shot resizing lube in your necks and let it dry before loading? And if yes what were your results?
The ones that were stuck after a year were sized with one shot. I spray the entire batch of brass and full length size/bump the shoulder .002", so the brass was all sprayed down, including inside the neck. I wiped down the outside but don't wipe the inside of the neck out before dumping powder/seating bullets unless it looks damp.
 

Orange Dust

Well-Known Member
Joined
Oct 23, 2015
Messages
1,580
The ones that were stuck after a year were sized with one shot. I spray the entire batch of brass and full length size/bump the shoulder .002", so the brass was all sprayed down, including inside the neck. I wiped down the outside but don't wipe the inside of the neck out before dumping powder/seating bullets unless it looks damp.
Me Too....
 

David Emerson

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LRH Team Member
Joined
Jan 1, 2020
Messages
750
Location
Drayton,ND
I have been thinking about this bullet weld all day. It has to be dissimilar metal corrosion. So. Then I thought. Some guys sonic clean or use solution with stainless pins. Brass gets very clean and as new. I think the cleaner the brass is the worse it would be. Anybody ever experiment with cases that had been shot and never cleaned vs the super clean cases?
 

David Emerson

Well-Known Member
LRH Team Member
Joined
Jan 1, 2020
Messages
750
Location
Drayton,ND
I have been thinking about this bullet weld all day. It has to be dissimilar metal corrosion. So. Then I thought. Some guys sonic clean or use solution with stainless pins. Brass gets very clean and as new. I think the cleaner the brass is the worse it would be. Anybody ever experiment with cases that had been shot and never cleaned vs the super clean cases?
Another brain wave is how much pressure does it take to blow the neck out against the chamber? I would think not much. I would think that a big gun running slower powder would not be effected as much as a small case running faster burning powder. Understand this is all hypothetical and not real world. Another thought. Would a crimp help with keeping the bullet held until the neck pops away?
 

David Emerson

Well-Known Member
LRH Team Member
Joined
Jan 1, 2020
Messages
750
Location
Drayton,ND
I use HBN on my long range rigs. After using it for a couple years, I have not seen any issues with inconsistency as long as you keep your process the same. If you change the way/amount of time/amount of HBN used, then yes you see some changes. The simple way to avoid that is to do it the same. I also try to coat my bullets in large lots to reduce any possibility of inconsistencies.

I had some rounds that had been stored about a year that I intentionally didn't coat, of the same caliber and same bullet in the same box with bullets that I did coat. Wanted to see if bullet weld was in fact an issue, and adjusted my die .050" deeper. Nearly all of the uncoated bullets had a loud "pop" when seated deeper, and the seating stem actually slightly dented the bullet, and they weren't consistently seated due to differences in how much the bullet was dented by the stem. To get the same CBTO, I would have had to slightly adjusted it for each individual round. All the HBN coated bullets seated deeper just like they were being newly seated in the case, and all seated to the same CBTO. That is exactly the reason why I started HBN coating, to keep consistency. Just make sure you don't store your ammo somewhere like in a truck or anywhere that it will be vibrating, it can cause the powder to break down and changes pressure significantly.

There is a significant pressure drop with the same charge from coating bullets, I usually have to add 1-2 grains in cartridges like a 6.5x284 up to 7mm rem mag to reach the same velocity, but I have noticed you can get around 20-50 fps more velocity prior to seeing the same pressure signs as with a naked bullet. That isn't much, and is not the reason I coat. Another thing I noticed, at least with the 147's in my .260ai and 180 VLD's in my cousins 7mm rem mag, was that it brought e.s.'s and s.d.'s down. Other guns I have used it in (.338 NM, .264 wm) have always used HBN, so I don't have a basis of comparison for them.

I have heard about it increasing barrel life, but there isn't really a scientific method to test this, as two different barrels made by the same manufacturer one after another may wear differently. However, I can see where it could due to a lower coefficient of friction in the barrel, though I don't know if that would be offset by the slightly higher powder charge that is needed to reach the same velocities.

My main reason for using it - shelf life of consistent ammunition, and increased consistency of said ammunition.

Also, not sure why but I don't see an option to vote on your poll.
This HBN. Do you have to shoot a number of rounds before the barrel levels out and consistent?
 

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