Bullet cores

elkaholic

Well-Known Member
Joined
Dec 4, 2008
Messages
9,842
Location
hauser, id.
All of you guys out there that have spent some time testing bullets: Have you noticed that most of the manufactures use a HARD lead alloy? The only reason I can see for doing that is to help control expansion (which should be the jackets job). I think its done because thinner jackets are usually more accurate. What I have found is that PURE lead performs much better (especially at long range) which is of interest to most of us. The pure lead is much more malable (sticky) so doesn't fragment near as easily. I like to use a thinner jacket (especially at the nose) and chemically bond it to the core. This seems to give the ultimate in long range performance.......Rich
 

bigngreen

Well-Known Member
Joined
Nov 24, 2008
Messages
8,336
Location
SW Montana
Rich, have you cut any bullets open and harness tested the cores? My dad and father in-law shoot alot of BPCR comps and they have harness testers to make sure they get the same alloy when they add more lead to the pot.
In the BPCR stuff it makes quite a difference in what alloy your casting, some fowl harder and some are more accurate.
I may cut a Berger and give it a test this weekend if I get time.
 

elkaholic

Well-Known Member
Joined
Dec 4, 2008
Messages
9,842
Location
hauser, id.
Rich, have you cut any bullets open and harness tested the cores? My dad and father in-law shoot alot of BPCR comps and they have harness testers to make sure they get the same alloy when they add more lead to the pot.
In the BPCR stuff it makes quite a difference in what alloy your casting, some fowl harder and some are more accurate.
I may cut a Berger and give it a test this weekend if I get time.

Pardon my ignorance, but is that what they use to test resistance in cables?..Rich
 

RockyMtnMT

Official LRH Sponsor
Joined
Mar 25, 2007
Messages
5,935
Location
Montana
I don't know, but I've been told... That the mass production of bullets doesn't allow for the use of pure lead and copper. The alloy products are easier to work with. But the alloy products are more brittle. The only production bullets that I know of that utilize pure copper and pure lead are the Swift Scirrocco, and Hawk bullets. The Hawk bullets are not exactly mass production either.

Steve
 

TOM H

Well-Known Member
Joined
Dec 24, 2001
Messages
1,223
I don't know, but I've been told... That the mass production of bullets doesn't allow for the use of pure lead and copper. The alloy products are easier to work with. But the alloy products are more brittle. The only production bullets that I know of that utilize pure copper and pure lead are the Swift Scirrocco, and Hawk bullets. The Hawk bullets are not exactly mass production either.

Steve

I was at Sierra this past spring and they said their bullet jacket are made 95% copper/5% Zinc and they didn't give the mixture of alloy used for the lead cores. I think the most common is tin/antimony and the mixture of those two with lead make the cores harder. It was interesting watching them make lead core.
 

elkaholic

Well-Known Member
Joined
Dec 4, 2008
Messages
9,842
Location
hauser, id.
I was at Sierra this past spring and they said their bullet jacket are made 95% copper/5% Zinc and they didn't give the mixture of alloy used for the lead cores. I think the most common is tin/antimony and the mixture of those two with lead make the cores harder. It was interesting watching them make lead core.

That is consistent with what I've heard as far as the alloys used. Some use a little more or less zinc. I think the zinc in the jacket cuts down on fowling somewhat and also runs through the dies a little easier. Everything is a tradeoff....Rich:D
 

Primary

LRH Assistant
Here are some related products that LRH members are talking about. Clicking on a product will take you to LRH’s partner, Primary, where you can find links to LRH discussions about these products.

 
 
Top