Brass problem or normal?

D

Deleted member 115654

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Like Magnum Maniac said your die is working as designed. You are looking at the unsized web area of the case; dies are not designed to size this solid area nor could they. You don't have a problem. A case sticking from neck sizing only jammed because of expansion above the region you are seeing as unsized and you FL sizer will take case of that area.

Another "type before reading".

It is amusing !
 

MagMan

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I agree, normal. However I don’t know that I would do to much bumping after he first firing. If the fired cases will chamber I would just do the neck portion and try again after the 2nd or 3rd firing.
 

misterc01

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So taking a "long time member's advice" on (re) reading the post: we find someone who 1. Full length sized brass 2. that was fired from his rifle and 3. and they suspect a problem with and 4. he does not want to put it the rifle for fear of it getting stuck, until he gets the problem resolved asks for some useful information from the forum members for their advice/solution/useful comments. And a long time member recommends always annealing cases after firing as do many other long time members. It leads me to wonder - is it possible someone who might be concerned about people reading posts before replying could have possibly in fact themselves sometimes not "read the post." Naw - a "long time member" would not do that I am sure. That might lead to a useless waste of time on a flame war. Plus I found only paying attention to forum member's who provide useful information in helping someone solve a problem, or actually provide detailed rationale for their comment, rather than glittering genralities, to be of value.
 

Alibiiv

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All right then will proceed with my reloading as always and test cycle each piece of brass. Should;ve known if two different makers dies gave the same exact results it was all most certainly normal.

Live and learn.

Thanks for the help.

I didn't read where you have tried them in your rifle. If you haven't tried them in your rifle, I strongly suggest that you try them before you reload anymore rounds. My experience has been that the distance between the top of the shell holder and the bottom of the shell holder where the base of the shell sits are all the same.
 

misterc01

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It sounds like he originally did and is worried about them jamming. . He a said" These were fired in and are for my Marlin 336A lever actions and I am very concerned about getting one stuck in the chamber. "
 
D

Deleted member 115654

Guest
I'll bet we can get this up to at least 20 pages !

Has anyone noticed that the OP has YET TO LOAD ANY AMMO AND TRY IT IN HIS RIFLE ???

I thought not.

Come on ! Type before reading thread ! 20 pages is possible.
 

misterc01

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Actually he doe. might not neel to reloa them - he can try the brass in the firearm first to see if it will chamber. Sort of "plunk" test. If does stick, then it is easy to push out with a cleaning rod. I first read that in several shooting forums.
 

DartonJager

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When I Cleaning with Stainless steel pins it always takes more lube to full length size. I started using lemon shine and armor all car wash and wax in the water. This leaves a thin coating on the cases and will let you use a normal amount of lube. If they size hard after cleaning with pins they typically won't size down enough unless you and wash and wax to the water. Use a little more lube and run them through the sizer again. Just my experience with Stainless pins. Good luck

I switched to Hornady Unique case lube and the cases resize with very minimal effort. I didn't know that about SST/pins needing more lube VS walnut media. Now that you mention it I realize it did require noticeable more effort to resize my brass after using SST/pins not a great deal more but enough to notice a difference.
its a full length sizer doing what it is supposed to do . a FL sizer sizes the neck , the shoulder angle ( to your set headspace) then angles away from the shoulder to the case head , that diameter at the die opening is the correct measurement at that distance of the angle, from the shoulder down .. that brass in the picture that shows no contact, doesn,t need to be sized there , that is why they asked if it fits your rifle

sometimes that area does swell up , but no need to discuss until your brass doesn't fit

** ???? iF, you took an 1/8in from headspace , you'd destroy the shoulder area ?? **

*** chamber drawing *** measure down from the shoulder 1.240 & see if the diameter is .4589 or less ( .4574 ** case drawing )

View attachment 222980
Thank you greatly for posting such an excellent and educational source of brass specific reloading information
It just so happens I have that same EXACT SAMMI data sheet sitting on my bench and have one for all the calibers I reload for. Stumbled onto SAMMI.org/WS a while ago.

Like to say a heartfelt thanks to all who replied and helped educate me on the particulars of brass resizing. I have sinse resized all 50 pieces of 1x fired Hornady 35 Remington brass and they all cycle effortless through both my 336's.

I have also as I always do checked the head space of every case with my Hornady head space gauge and they all checked within min/max spec.
 
D

Deleted member 115654

Guest
OP you could have saved a lot of time and effort by you and others had you tried the sized cases in your rifle before assuming something was amiss.

You might wish to buy this book: McPherson On Leverguns: Customizing, Handloading, and Using The Lever-Action Rifle (Black And White Edition) Paperback – August 5, 2018

Also: https://www.americanrifleman.org/articles/2014/4/18/the-enduring-35-remington/




Good shooting.
 

DartonJager

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Messages
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OP you could have saved a lot of time and effort by you and others had you tried the sized cases in your rifle before assuming something was amiss.

You sir are indeed absolutely correct. I deviated from my long established practice of resize a case try it in the rifle and then proceed checking every other re-sized case. I have always done this before proceeding to priming my brass.

I felt as I was reloading for lever action rifles this was especially important. I also make absolutely certain that once fired out of my 336c that brass only get used for that particular 336, even though I confirm every reload will chamber in all 336's.


I openly admit I over reacted to the results of the difference between the sized and un-case and I now know why.

I only recently realized that some of what I learned or was taught about reloading and had been putting into use for well over 20 years especially reloading bottle necked rifle cartridges was while not outright false it was I now know not necessarily true and should be not have ever been considered a blanket rule to be applied in all situations.

I have also have earned over the last two years and are constantly learning that I do not know as much as I thought I did and my understanding of certain terms, how they apply, what they actually mean and thier importance in reloading especially reloading bottle necked rifle cartridges and I had either or both misunderstood these terms or not been applying them correctly.
The fact I forgot the 35 Remington is a rimless cartridge and just how important that fact can be is just one such example.
In short I have realized and accepted my knowledge of reloading is not as extensive and complete as I once thought it to be and I made two mistakes. First I made the mistake of assuming that just because you've done something a certain way and enjoyed success you must be doing it correctly and second mistake I made was essentially blindly fallowing the advice from someone just because I believed they were far more knowledgeable than I on reloading is not a great idea.
I came to these two conclusions recently and my once confident belief in my reloading knowledge has been subject to some minor doubt so I am very closely scrutinizing everything I do when reloading and understand now that can lead to over reacting as I did.
I have I guess one would call a bad habit of always trying to have a point of view of its either absolutely correct or incorrect or get as close to that philosophy as I can. A kind of "set it and forget it" belief on rules and procedures. I now know that philosophy is not always wise, applicable or actually possible in reloadig.

One such rule I was taught and read in my reloading manual when I first began reloading in the days prior to the existence of the internet for my bottle necked cartridges was that neck sizing will always produce more accurate ammo than full length resizing.

I have found by experimentation that is definitely not been true for all of my rifles. My 338wm, 300wm, 300wsm, 7mmstw and 6.5x55 all shot at least as accurate when I FL sized my brass vs neck only and in the case of my 300wsm 6.5x55 and 338wm shot unquestionably better when I FL re-sized my brass.
I am basically starting over at reloading by trying out a combination of body only sizing dies and using 21st century mandrels as well as no longer neck sizing only and FL resizing all my brass.

As a result I occasionally suffer instances of self doubt like this particular one and admittedly a little to quick choose to ask for advice before making every effort to figure it out on my own.

I also made a mistake of allowing myself to get into a situation of waiting to close to deer season to get all my reloading done so I become worried if I didn't get an answer quickly enough I might find myself not having sufficient ammo for deer season as my normal work week is closer to 70hrs than 60 if you factor in travel time.

Thats about it.
Thanks again to all who helped me and have increased my knowledge and understanding of reloading.

You might wish to buy this book: McPherson On Leverguns: Customizing, Handloading, and Using The Lever-Action Rifle (Black And White Edition) Paperback – August 5, 2018

Also: https://www.americanrifleman.org/articles/2014/4/18/the-enduring-35-remington/




Good shooting.
 

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