Brass prep?

matt_3479

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Jan 31, 2010
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Southern Ontario
Well my first full custom is going to be ready first week of June and I can't wait! I would like to get everything prepped so I can start testing it when i go pick it up. I would like to do it the best way possible and I'm curious what you guys do?

I have brand new lapua 260. Rem brass, and 140 Berger hybrids. What would you do to prep your brass?
 

nosualc

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Aug 11, 2009
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rogers, MN
Inspect them to rule out any complete loser cases (few if any likely for Lapua). If it were not Lapua, I typically do a quick weight sort to cull any extreme odd-balls.

It's very unlikely that they'll be need to be sized, check a few empty cases to make sure they chamber.

Run a 6.5mm expander mandrel into each case neck to iron out any dents, chamfer inside/out, deburr the flash holes, and load/shoot em.

-nosualc
 

stonehands1

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Feb 25, 2015
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It has always been my thinking that if everything is exactly the same every time that each bullet should have the same poi. In my smaller rifles like my 6mmAI which has only 50 grains of powder versus my Warbird which has 100+ grains, brass prep twice as critical (in my head anyway).
My number one goal is to make every piece of brass exactly the same.
1. Cleaning in tumbler.
2. Clean them inside with a rotary brush.
3. Resize and deprime. Make sure to clean resizing lube off each case after.
4. Trim all to same length every time.
5. Clean and debur primer pockets.
6. Chamfer in and out.
7. Sort by weight. Very important on smaller cases.

Weight every bullet and sort. Each group of loaded rounds should weigh exactly the same and be seated to the same depth when loaded.
Also I clean my resizer when done to get lube out. Have had trouble with build up in past. Good luck and have fun.
 

JimOK

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Dec 31, 2004
Messages
8
Debur the flash holes. It may not be as necessary with Lapua brass but its a fast process and it has been shown in tests to improve accuracy.
 

Outlaw6.0

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Feb 18, 2010
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Gillette, WY
I can't use Lapua for everything but in those I do use, I have yet to find a flash hole that needed it. Though it certainly won't hurt anything, it may prove to be an exercise in futility.


t
 

16Bore

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Feb 14, 2010
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146
I'd just make sure the necks are round, chamfer, and prime all except one to be used as a dummy to see where the lands are. You could figure out your run up charge and seat long until the rifle is in your hands, then adjust where needed.
 

scrmblr1982cj8

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Jul 14, 2013
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La Grange, KY
It has always been my thinking that if everything is exactly the same every time that each bullet should have the same poi. In my smaller rifles like my 6mmAI which has only 50 grains of powder versus my Warbird which has 100+ grains, brass prep twice as critical (in my head anyway).
My number one goal is to make every piece of brass exactly the same.
1. Cleaning in tumbler.
2. Clean them inside with a rotary brush.
3. Resize and deprime. Make sure to clean resizing lube off each case after.
4. Trim all to same length every time.
5. Clean and debur primer pockets.
6. Chamfer in and out.
7. Sort by weight. Very important on smaller cases.

Weight every bullet and sort. Each group of loaded rounds should weigh exactly the same and be seated to the same depth when loaded.
Also I clean my resizer when done to get lube out. Have had trouble with build up in past. Good luck and have fun.
Great list! The only thing I would add is after you resize your brass, make sure it will cycle in your gun. Nothing sucks worse than making a batch of reloads only to find out that the rounds won't fit in your gun. I've got my first batch of .30-06 (250 rounds) that I'll need to take apart and redo.
 

16Bore

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Feb 14, 2010
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146
I wouldn't load without a bullet comparator or headspace insert.
 

stonehands1

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Feb 25, 2015
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121
I wouldn't load without a bullet comparator or headspace insert.
For sure. A comparator and oal guage are a must for precision reloading. I used to just put a dummy round in set long and sharpie the bullet to see where it hit he lands by closing the bolt. What I found with the oal gauge was that I was at least .015 off what I thought. Every bullet has a different Ogive...that's where the comparator comes in. And to think I wasted all that time and powder trying to get it right without the proper tools. Silly really.
 

16Bore

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Feb 14, 2010
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146
I think we all have chased COAL the wrong way at one time or another. Base to ogive is THE number, COAL is just to make sure it fits in the box.

I used to neck size only, then bump the shoulder when I couldn't close the bolt. Sounds good on paper, but each time you load that particular batch of brass its different. Now I just round out necks on virgin hulls for the initial firing then FL size until the headspace is .002 short of the bolt not closing. Currently on my RCBS 223 comp dies I'm finding its just a light cam over. Obviously you can set it back more (heavier cam over) but .002 has been a peach with this particular rig.

And a 50 cent 7/8" O-Ring between the lock nut and press head is the dirtiest trick there is to micro-adjust the sizing die.
 

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