Blue thread loctite on scope rings or not

Radman

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Nov 23, 2019
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TN
The folks that mounted my scope used blue loctite for the base mounts, but not for the scope rings. Seems the screws on the rear ring are loosening up after just a few shots now (464 rounds through barrel). Was curious to know if you all use blue loctite on your scope ring screws or not? What are the drawbacks of doing so? Appreciate any insights you may have....
I glue everything. I use white school glue. It has worked great for me for years. It holds, it can be broken loose easily & it cleans up with water. What works works!
 

xsn10s

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Mar 7, 2016
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A little heat will help tremendously
Oh ButterBean I win and got the base off. I used heat from a soldering iron but I believe impact was what broke it free. I drove a torx bit into the stripped head. Well I found a bed of red loctite lol. The front screw wasn't even tight lol. I would of used more heat but I think the picatinny rail was acting like a big heat sink, I never got the smell of loctite getting heated up.
 

ButterBean

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Oh ButterBean I win and got the base off. I used heat from a soldering iron but I believe impact was what broke it free. I drove a torx bit into the stripped head. Well I found a bed of red loctite lol. The front screw wasn't even tight lol. I would of used more heat but I think the picatinny rail was acting like a big heat sink, I never got the smell of loctite getting heated up.
Good Deal
 

ntsqd

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I was taught 30 years ago blue on base screws, NOTHING on ring screws. We only installed Burris bases and rings back then. Never had one come back or receive a complaint.

These days I like the capillary action lock-tite versions for small to tiny screws. Tighten dry screws to spec, then apply the lock-tite.
EDIT: I still wouldn't put any on the ring screws.

If all that you've got is a flame to heat with, heat a piece of copper (if possible) or stainless steel and use that to apply the heat to the screw. Then I like a sharp rap with a punch set in the bottom of the screw's socket.
 
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xsn10s

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Whatever you do don't do this lol. I'm not sure what the guy was thinking when he did this. It may explain why I never did smell any loctite releasing. The picatinny rail might have been acting as a big heat sink and the layer of loctite between the rail and action was an insulator. The front screw wasn't even close to bottoming out.
 

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ButterBean

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Whatever you do don't do this lol. I'm not sure what the guy was thinking when he did this. It may explain why I never did smell any loctite releasing. The picatinny rail might have been acting as a big heat sink and the layer of loctite between the rail and action was an insulator. The front screw wasn't even close to bottoming out.
That's just plain ignorance
 

xsn10s

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Mar 7, 2016
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That's just plain ignorance
I'll have to look into this. It might be the reason why I lost 20 MOA of elevation adjustment. The base might be poorly formed to the receiver which would explain the loctite "bedding" job. In any case this isn't the first time I've seen this done. So it's a heads up for people who purchase firearms with optics mounted.
 

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