Bipod broke my stock!!! Ever seen this?

naja302

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Jun 28, 2013
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I was thinking about just bedding this into the stock and leaving off the broken piece.

 

Coldfinger

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I’m having trouble believing this just happened. I was shooting off a bipod from the bench and this happened. I added the pic rail and additional t-nut to this stock but it broke through the factory installed one (I installed the one further forward). This is a super lightweight carbon fiber and Kevlar stock.

the rifle manufacturer stated that they do not recommend use of a bipod on this model so there is no warranty coverage.

anyway, it’s either a freak deal or needs to be a word of caution to anyone using a super lightweight stock. I can’t imagine a stock that you can’t use a bipod with...View attachment 200558View attachment 200559View attachment 200560View attachment 200561View attachment 200562View attachment 200563
Wow unbelievable!!! But look at that channel under the barrel channel.
 

Coldfinger

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Well I certainly see no point in owning one that you can’t put a bipod on...they obviously didn’t advertise that fact anywhere
Exactly, seems like a sling stud would put more stress on the studs than a bipod during normal carrying. I’d put a length of all thread in the channel and epoxy it back together.
 

Muddyboots

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As an experienced "stockbroker" :eek:, one of the things I learned the hard way that countersinking anything into the barrel channel can weaken the forearm of the stock since you are severing the structural continuity at that point. IF you add anything to the stock where you are securing the object to the channel, the flat washers etc HAVE to be exactly contoured to the channel to prevent excessive edge forces from the washers etc exerting upon the stock. If the washer is contoured to the channel, the force is spread out across the channel accordingly. I've sheared off bipod studs just from recoil with my 300WM when shooting off a concrete bench. Only happened once and probably bad stud but it happened and was a real PITA to remove the broken threaded part. A 300WM at 7.5lbs with a 180 @ 3100 will be in 37 lbs of recoil neighborhood. Shear strength of small screws will be tested.

I spent a lot of professional time in product safety and IF the bipod statement is not in the product manual anywhere, you definitely have a point of discussion with them. I agree with other commenters, telling you verbally is after the fact is a not a defensible position and even it is in a "brochure" the actual manual is where legal positions are "normally" stated IMHO.

If I was the manufacturer, I would be doing whatever I could to make it right even if it was repairing it so it was usable without a bipod. A perceived defect in a product that I made would be something I would want to be corrected so that my reputation remained whole. Crap happens and you would think they would try to help you out somehow to at least make you "whole" again. Heck, years ago, I fell on a walnut stock, my fault, broke it at the tang and Savage replaced it and told me to go hunting. And yes, I have a real soft spot for Savage rifles.

Looking at the stock and not knowing exactly how stable the material is, I would suggest using threaded aluminum rods (2) in parallel into the piece that broke of and then epoxy the other end into the main stock. There are a lot of epoxies out there that will strengthen the connection better than it was before. The rods would definitely provide the structural stability and possibly even allow a bipod in future. The added weight would not be overly significant and probably worth it as well.

I was sickened just looking at the break and I am really impressed with your character dealing with a problem that probably should not have happened in a custom rifle. I would engage them with more discussion on just what they can do for you. If they are washing their hands of it, then that is a huge telling sign of their overall business perspective on customer service. Probably not someone I would want to do business with
 

flyguy1

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As an experienced "stockbroker" :eek:, one of the things I learned the hard way that countersinking anything into the barrel channel can weaken the forearm of the stock since you are severing the structural continuity at that point. IF you add anything to the stock where you are securing the object to the channel, the flat washers etc HAVE to be exactly contoured to the channel to prevent excessive edge forces from the washers etc exerting upon the stock. If the washer is contoured to the channel, the force is spread out across the channel accordingly. I've sheared off bipod studs just from recoil with my 300WM when shooting off a concrete bench. Only happened once and probably bad stud but it happened and was a real PITA to remove the broken threaded part. A 300WM at 7.5lbs with a 180 @ 3100 will be in 37 lbs of recoil neighborhood. Shear strength of small screws will be tested.

I spent a lot of professional time in product safety and IF the bipod statement is not in the product manual anywhere, you definitely have a point of discussion with them. I agree with other commenters, telling you verbally is after the fact is a not a defensible position and even it is in a "brochure" the actual manual is where legal positions are "normally" stated IMHO.

If I was the manufacturer, I would be doing whatever I could to make it right even if it was repairing it so it was usable without a bipod. A perceived defect in a product that I made would be something I would want to be corrected so that my reputation remained whole. Crap happens and you would think they would try to help you out somehow to at least make you "whole" again. Heck, years ago, I fell on a walnut stock, my fault, broke it at the tang and Savage replaced it and told me to go hunting. And yes, I have a real soft spot for Savage rifles.

Looking at the stock and not knowing exactly how stable the material is, I would suggest using threaded aluminum rods (2) in parallel into the piece that broke of and then epoxy the other end into the main stock. There are a lot of epoxies out there that will strengthen the connection better than it was before. The rods would definitely provide the structural stability and possibly even allow a bipod in future. The added weight would not be overly significant and probably worth it as well.

I was sickened just looking at the break and I am really impressed with your character dealing with a problem that probably should not have happened in a custom rifle. I would engage them with more discussion on just what they can do for you. If they are washing their hands of it, then that is a huge telling sign of their overall business perspective on customer service. Probably not someone I would want to do business with
You know once you perform a modification though, all bets are off. I'll bet if it hadn't been modified Cooper would have replaced it.
 

Muddyboots

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flyguy1: I agree with the thought of a modification but reality is a bipod is a normal addition to any long range rifle. I would bet this would have happened if it was a bipod just attached to the original sling stud that was forward to the spot where the OP added for the rail which should have been a stronger location to . My point is still there should have been some sort of product warning clearly stated in the manual that the OP would have then had an opportunity (if it was read) and realize the stock would not support a bipod. If the OP did not read and this happened, then his bad. If he read and still added it, his bad. But the OP never had the opportunity to make a decision if it is not in the manual. Setting this all aside, I would still expect the manufacturer to at least try to help mitigate the problem even without taking responsibility. Maybe there would have been a repair charge but nevertheless that is customer service that I would expect anyway from a custom rifle manufacturer. They should have the knowledge to determine if it is repairable and provide some recommendations that may allow the stock to be usable going forward. We all make mistakes using and abusing our rifles on hard hunts, crap happens and if you go back to the manufacturer, I would still expect some help to bring rifle back to whole again. Maybe on my nickle but still a sign of their customer means something to them.
 

Kae006

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Sorry to hear this, I was thinking about getting a Cooper 92 in a non-magnum caliber, not now! It's total BS that Cooper says you shouldn't use a bipod after the fact and it's not in their manual! They should replace the stock! Good luck!
Worth noting that Cooper only offers a "2 year limited warranty" with their rifles, which seems at odds with the majority of manufacturers in this industry.
 

thwatson2

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Assuming they didn’t state this before the incident and told you after the fact. Can’t believe a manufacturer would not (without question) replace that. Totally unacceptable! Every rifle from a child size 22 to a 50 BMG should be capable of carrying a bipod. It is nothing more than a rest. This stuff really aggravates me. Something you would expect from Chinese crap.
If they had this written on paperwork before you put bipod on, then you should’ve listened. But that would tell me this thing was built poorly to start with...would’ve likely happened sitting on sandbags
 
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30BR

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Feb 9, 2013
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I did not know that the manufacturer recommended against bipod use until they called me today to tell me (after I sent them the pictures. I certainly wouldn’t buy a gun that you can’t use a bipod on...except maybe a lever gun.

I think I can appreciate the physics but I actually do not preload my bipod at all...something I’ve always thought was a fault of mine but not one I’ve ever cared to correct.

Now here’s the crazy in me...I’m gonna probably just re-install my pic rail 3 inches farther back and just smooth over the broken front of the stock with some epoxy and still use it as my super lightweight backpack gun.

no sense in paying another $600 or so for a new stock....that I still can’t put a bipod on 🤣
I think if you drill some long small od holes in both parts you could epoxy in some drill rod and make it work.
Its prob a great stock for carry and offhand.
 

jgs8163

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That’s a drag. I hadn’t realized when I first read this that you had made the modification and added the second stud. When you added the rail section did you over torque the rear stud? I hope you find a solution and maybe if you reference this thread Cooper may be willing to take partial responsibility or just fix it entirely. I saw CA just do this for LRH member over a similar type post on here.
 
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