Binoculars

CApighunter

Well-Known Member
Joined
Nov 7, 2020
Messages
98
Location
California
I’m a big fan of Mavens, the B2 9x45 specifically. I feel they give up very little optical performance to the Swaro ELs and prefer them to SLCs. Can’t go wrong with any of the big 3, or Meopta Meostars as an honorable mention.
 

Blacktailer

Well-Known Member
Joined
Sep 17, 2019
Messages
96
Location
AZ
Nobody can make a recommendation for you unless we know how you are going to use them. Is weight an issue? Size? Power? If you are backpacking your criteria are way different than sitting in stands. If you hunt woods your needs are way different than hunting open country.
I have 4 different binos for different scenarios.
 

Short Case

Well-Known Member
Joined
Oct 10, 2012
Messages
303
I personally would go somewhere that carries multiple brands. We did just that and looked through them all at low light and objects at various distances. Not all binoculars are the same and realized that from even same make and model had variations. We were constantly getting pushed by the dealer to go Swarovski. After having all the various makes out in the same power and diameter we kept eliminating as we with the people at the store. One brand stood out pretty good and it was not Swarovski but they were pretty pricey. The next one that to my surprise was a razor. Even the individual from the store was surprised and agreed. truthfully We were all little disappointed in the Swarovski and I even own some. Needless to say we now have a razor. Just my two cents but compare them at the same time and same power and magnification to your eye and get them adjusted for your eye before you make your decision.
I have been looking at those to, there are nice
 

Carp1

Active Member
Joined
May 27, 2021
Messages
26
Location
Texas
I agree with HuntnPack on using Leica's. I do a lot of guiding whitetail hunters and I can always tell bucks from doe early in the morning when my clients can only see blobs moving around.

LEICA GEOVID 10X42 R RANGEFINDING​

 

ducky

Well-Known Member
Joined
Jan 17, 2016
Messages
450
Location
Colorado
Not real happy with Leupold

What aren't you happy about? I had an old RB-800 binoculars from Leupold. Great concept one of the first range finding binoculars made, but they were poorly executed. I wasn't happy with them either and so I sold them for the Minox BL 10X42 that Doug at Camera Land suggested back when they first came out.

The Minox were great but after 10+ years of service a prisim came loose in the left barrel. Minox said that I would have to pay for them to be repaired, so I planned on selling them when they came back. Minox didn't repair but replaced at no cost with their 10X44 X-HD models. From what I can tell, these are excellent binoculars in the $1-1.2K range.

I looked at a bunch of binoculars when I thought I'd be replacing my Minox. I never got my hands on Meopta, but Vortex Razor and Leupold BX-5 were top picks in 10X binoculars for around $1K. If I were to step up to $2K plus binoculars Leica Geovids are the only way I'd go.
 

littlebighorn

Well-Known Member
Joined
Nov 28, 2019
Messages
94
Location
Utah
I just picked up a pair of Sig kilo 3000btx with range finder for a little over 1k, but so far I really like them and the ranging capability eliminates one more item in my pack.
 

Sirrated

Active Member
Joined
Mar 4, 2015
Messages
44
I agree with HuntnPack on using Leica's. I do a lot of guiding whitetail hunters and I can always tell bucks from doe early in the morning when my clients can only see blobs moving around.

LEICA GEOVID 10X42 R RANGEFINDING​

Totally agree with this coment, I've had the rest but was never satisfied until I bought Leica Geovids 10X42 with rangefinder.
 

yobuck

Well-Known Member
Joined
Aug 23, 2008
Messages
1,759
Location
east central fl. /n.c. pa.
If your type of hunting requires sitting and glassing, your missing things if your not using a tripod, regardless of glass quality.
For those interested in using binoculars for hunting, and especially those who use them for long glassing sessions, there are several very good articles on the 24 Hour Campfire site (archives) list id suggest reading.
First go to the 24 hour Campfire site.
On the top of the page, clik the (home page.)
Then click on the ( archives.)
Then click onto (page 2.)
The will be 2 separate articles, both very good, but be especially sure to read the one entitled ( big eyes ).
Realize that modern day long range hunting has been taking place in certain areas of PA for a very long time.
Also realize that virtually (all) of the hunters doing that there are using tripod mounted optics.
Also realize that the vast majority of them are (choosing) to use twin spotters in brackets as their choice of optics.
And the reasons for that are numerous.
But non the less, the technique is the same regardless of optics.
Read the article, consider the experience level of the author prior to him writing the article.
When i first read it, now probably a decade ago, there was one thing i for sure didnt need.
That was another set of good tripod mounted glasses.
But then our good friend Doug left me know he was clearing out the inventory of the 15x58 model Minox as it was being replaced with a newer model.
So i ordered a set, and before i hung up the brown truck delivered them.
Typical of how Doug does things.
We did our own version of the comparison test on the lawn at our NC PA camp using 15x56 Leica Geovids, 15x56 Swaros, and the 15x58 Minox, by looking at very small things at very long distances.
We all felt the Leicas were just a tad bit brighter, but the only one who thought the Swaros were actually better but by just a little bit, was the guy who owned them.
But even he said that he wished he had seen all of them before he bought his.
Especially since i had only paid $500 for the Minox on close out.
But the biggest surprise was how well a very old set of clean Bushnell 50 mm spotters in a bracket with a good set of 16x eyepieces compared with the high priced stuff.
Seeing is believing, all the talk about optics is just that unless your actually comparing them side by side on the same day at the same target.
 

onetohunt

Well-Known Member
Joined
Jan 9, 2017
Messages
224
To me, buying binos is strictly up to the eyes looking through them. I will agree, some glass just blows other glass out of the water and your eyes will tell you this. You need to ask yourself a few questions: 1. How are you going to use them? Out west climbing mountains all day and scanning big open areas? In a box blind, looking down a 1 mile sendero? Sitting in a tree, in fairly thick cover? Will only get used once or twice a year? and 2. Can you justify the cost to the value of your use?
Everyone on all of these sites have something they are very loyal to and will stand by it. Until you actually try for yourself and compare and then ask yourself those two question above, it will be tough for the opinions on here to help you much. Then again, it is their opinion and what you do with it is your call!!
 

vancewalker007

Well-Known Member
Joined
Mar 30, 2013
Messages
580
What binocular do you use for hunting,
I have a old set of Leupold and want something
new and don't really want Leupold
Depends a lot on what you are using them for. The needs of a tree stand hunter in Illinois is way different from a Coues deer hunter in Arizona.
 
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