Binoculars vs Spotting Scope?

General RE LEE

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I’ve got an Athlon Talos 20-60X80 spotting scope that is in the $150 price point. It’s been adequate for spotting targets out to a 1K on the range.

Im considering a pair of Vortex Diamondback HD 15x56 binos to use on a tripod for shooting range and some bean field glassing.

For the rifle range and occasional beam field glassing what is a better option? A spotting scope or binos?
 

StanleyActual

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I’ve got an Athlon Talos 20-60X80 spotting scope that is in the $150 price point. It’s been adequate for spotting targets out to a 1K on the range.

Im considering a pair of Vortex Diamondback HD 15x56 binos to use on a tripod for shooting range and some bean field glassing.

For the rifle range and occasional beam field glassing what is a better option? A spotting scope or binos?

I rarely if ever use a spotter at the range. I use my rifle scope to spot my shots. I’ll use a spotter while Im out hunting if I need to dial in on something to get more detail but thats about it.

what would your primary purpose for
It be? Range time? Are you shooting with someone else and need to spot there shots?

IMO you’re going to get far more use out of a good set of Binos. If you do go more than 12x on the Binos, you’re going to want to have them mounted to a tripod. I’d recommend 10x on the binos. You’ll get better all round use out of them.
 

jebel

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One doesn’t typically make a choice of binoculars vs. spotting scope for hunting situations, as they’re usually used in tandem. Binoculars, though lower power, are more comfortable for long glassing sessions using both eyes. Spotters excel at dissecting the details of a distant target once identified, but can be tiresome to use for long glassing sessions.
For the uses you describe, the spotter is likely best for a static target at the range and binoculars are likely best for prolonged glassing of a bean field.
 

26Reload

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Target shooting...i shoot at 12x on all my scopes..and turn power up on scopes to see bullets holes at 1-400yds....
Hunting my scopes are set at 6x....
And use my Leupold 10-17 switchpowers to glass....not my scope...and depending on animal or terrain I may turn my scope up higher to shoot....
 

RockyRandy

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I love the question! I hunt the desert and started out using a spotting scope 20x60 power but I hated the eye strain that you get from looking for Animals with one eye for a hour or more so I purchased a pair of Swarovski 15x56 Bio's. So when I were spotting for animals with a hunting buddy one of us would use the spotting scope and the other one would use the Bio's and 90% of the time the person using the Bio's would find the Animals first. For sizing up a animal or seeing a shots from a distance spotting scopes are awesome but for finding game i'll take a great pair of Bio's every time. I will add that you do need a good tri-pod ( I prefer a mono pod) when using the Bio's.
 

skipglo

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I rarely if ever use a spotter at the range. I use my rifle scope to spot my shots. I’ll use a spotter while Im out hunting if I need to dial in on something to get more detail but thats about it.

what would your primary purpose for
It be? Range time? Are you shooting with someone else and need to spot there shots?

IMO you’re going to get far more use out of a good set of Binos. If you do go more than 12x on the Binos, you’re going to want to have them mounted to a tripod. I’d recommend 10x on the binos. You’ll get better all round use out of them.
Well if he's an Entomologist too...the 15 power fixed....might be handy...saves bending over! And...you can inspect an Ant colony from 50 yards away!
 

Pro2A

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One doesn’t typically make a choice of binoculars vs. spotting scope for hunting situations, as they’re usually used in tandem. Binoculars, though lower power, are more comfortable for long glassing sessions using both eyes. Spotters excel at dissecting the details of a distant target once identified, but can be tiresome to use for long glassing sessions.
For the uses you describe, the spotter is likely best for a static target at the range and binoculars are likely best for prolonged glassing of a bean field.
Ever try using a digiscope on spotter concept for phone screen glassing. Reduces eye strain, provides peripheral awareness....kinda nice in toothed/clawed critter country. Depending on phone, great resolution and zoom. If better for your phone, can dump adapter in short order to get maximum resolution with only quality scope to pin target details, make shoot/no shoot final decision. With wi-fi style adapter can use phone or even tablet for larger screen.
 
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StanleyActual

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Well if he's an Entomologist too...the 15 power fixed....might be handy...saves bending over! And...you can inspect an Ant colony from 50 yards away!

haha, I’ve ended up deciding on a set of 20x Binos instead of a spotter for hunting. My zeiss 10x42’s are my go to, and the 20’s if more detail is needed. I rarely find myself going over 20x on a spotter
 
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