Bi pods or Shooting sticks

Discussion in 'Long Range Hunting & Shooting' started by Gibbshooter43, Aug 18, 2019.


Help Support Long Range Hunting by donating:


  1. Will Gray

    Will Gray Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    124
    Joined:
    Feb 21, 2013
    I like both. For shooting at the range, I use a bipod attached to the sling swivel and heavy bag for the butt stock. For getting ready to hunt from a blind I do not use the bipod because of the weight it adds to the forend so I recheck the zero using a bag rest. I use a bipod aft of the trigger guard to support the rifle in the deer blind, waiting for a target but not for the shot. In a ground blind I use a tripod forward and a bipod aft on the rifle for the shot. Have not done any open field hunting as the areas where I hunt would make that all but impossible due to trees and brush.
     
    Huggy likes this.
  2. TRG65

    TRG65 Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    79
    Joined:
    Dec 21, 2017
    This is similar to the setup I use for hunting and matches. I have an RRS ball head, but the same tripod. Very stable. I've shot sub-moa 5 shot groups during practice off the tripod set-up kneeling. Alternatively, if you have a log or something for a front rest, you can use the tripod leg as a rear support. When I time myself, it takes about 15-20 seconds to fully extend and set up.
     
    Huggy and waveslayer like this.
  3. johnish

    johnish Member

    Messages:
    10
    Joined:
    May 27, 2011
    I am in the 'both' camp too. Most of my hunting is over ground where there is very little chance of shooting prone - so I carry shooting sticks for standing, kneeling sitting (preferred) shots. Set up right its surprising how stable you can get it - add a second set of sticks for the butt and your range potential is surprising. Yes, it's not fast to set up, but for longer ranges speed is usually not the biggest issue. Where and when I can bipods or using a backpack rest are favourites. Sticks are also very useful when covering rough terrain, rivers and streams. I've used mine to extract myself from unseen bogs and to cross a small upland river in spate that would have been very tricky otherwise.
     
    Huggy likes this.
  4. waveslayer

    waveslayer Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    101
    Joined:
    Apr 9, 2012
    If you are up there in age , not assuming, but the best all around way to go is using a Really Right Stuff Tripod. Get the SOAR model and install the Arca mounts on your rifles, spotting scopes and even Binos. You can be glossing and quickly switch out the spotting scope to your rifle and you will have a solid rest. I would practice shooting off a tripod.

    If you are able to get low in the dirt and it presents a clean field of view and shot, prone on a Bipod is always best. But I'm lazy and standing there with a tripod gets me over bushes etc...

    The SOAR package is extremely light, worth every penny! Give it a try. I used to use Manfroto but RRS is that much better
     
    Huggy likes this.
  5. BrentM

    BrentM Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    1,779
    Joined:
    Jan 10, 2013
    Most people don't know that much about tripod use but go to one PRS match and the world is much different when you leave. Tripods, bipods, sticks, packs, natural obstacles, etc all become part of your tool bag. If I was told I could only take 2 things it'd be the pack and tripod. I think a guy could get both front and rear support with those in just about any situation.
     
    Huggy likes this.
  6. waveslayer

    waveslayer Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    101
    Joined:
    Apr 9, 2012
    I uploaded some pics, you can see how stable the RRS is. That's elk at 600 plus yards, that gun doesn't have a Arca rail mounted to the stock yet, but using a Hogg Saddle worked perfectly
     

    Attached Files:

    Huggy likes this.
  7. jrock

    jrock Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    866
    Joined:
    Mar 12, 2014
    Both. I have the bipod attached for prone shots and when those aren't an option, the sticks cover sitting or standing. I find the use the sticks adequately for long range, I have to brace my body against something like a rock or tree so my rear rest is stable enough.
     
    Huggy and PawneeStrider74a like this.
  8. ENGUNEER

    ENGUNEER Active Member

    Messages:
    40
    Joined:
    Jun 20, 2013
    I use attached bipods (different heights), and quad pods (sitting or standing height) depending on the situation at hand (plus trees, rocks, backpack).
     
    Huggy and PawneeStrider74a like this.
  9. PawneeStrider74a

    PawneeStrider74a Member

    Messages:
    6
    Joined:
    Dec 26, 2015
     
    GonzoK34 likes this.
  10. MerlinMc

    MerlinMc Member

    Messages:
    9
    Joined:
    Dec 31, 2017
    You need both and consider a tripod rather than a two-legged stick. Perhaps all 3. I have used my bipod for all types of precision shots like croc and hippo. I also have 2 tripods: 1 heavy duty aluminum camera tripod with a Hog Saddle and then 1 light weight carbon fiber Spartan Sentinel tripod. The Sentinel is set up for my Blaser stocks and is an exquisite piece of kit.

    I have used two-legged sticks, usually the PH's. Whatever you use, practice with what the actual tool you're going to use. You don't want to be shooting at game for the first time using whatever tool you've selected.
     
    Huggy and PawneeStrider74a like this.
  11. TBell

    TBell Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    65
    Joined:
    May 12, 2012
    I was a big believer in bi- pods but hunting in New Mexico last year using walking sticks and using them as Shooting sticks worked much easier on uneven ground. Shooting down into canyons
     
    Huggy and PawneeStrider74a like this.
  12. nicholasjohn

    nicholasjohn Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    179
    Joined:
    Feb 12, 2019
    I'm with you on this one, Grey Fox. Woodchucks aside, I could probably count on my ten fingers how many times I've been able to get low enough to shoot at an animal from the prone position. Mostly, brush is the problem, and sitting on my keester with an old pair of Underwood sticks has been the answer most of the time. They also work well kneeling, and bracing the elbows is the key - especially the one connected to the trigger hand. If you can lean your torso against a rock or fence post, so much the better. They fold up short, are light in weight, and can be stuck out of the way in the back pocket of your pants for the last hundred yards of your belly-crawl into shooting position. If I was going to do anything different, it might be to get a longer set, since I have had a few situations when a standing shot was all that was available. They all worked out OK from the un-supported offhand position, but only because the animals were very close. I also think that as I get older, I might like to have a tall set of sticks to aid in walking in rough terrain, so I have my eyes out for a full-length set of sticks. Any recommendations for me ???? Thanks, Guys.


    Nick
     
    Huggy and PawneeStrider74a like this.
  13. Pacecount

    Pacecount Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    76
    Joined:
    Nov 23, 2015
    I like both... bipod needed for long range or a long bipod when sitting hillside.

    Sticks.... I like the primos monopod Trigger stick. Mine has worked fine although some people manage to break them.
     
    Huggy and skipglo like this.
  14. Zep

    Zep Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    429
    Joined:
    Dec 4, 2011
    I made my own shooting sticks. One set for kneeing and one set for standing.

    I used furring strips I purchased at Lowe's. 1x2x8 for less than a buck. Of course actual measurements are less. Bolt, washers and wing nut. Stained to blend into environment.

    Got tired of spending money and wanted to make something myself. I also use the standing set to steady myself as I walk the fields. I use these for hunting woodchucks.

    It's not rocket science.
     
    Huggy likes this.