Best zero for longer range shooting

smokin502

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I'm getting into long range shooting and have been reading a lot about point blank zero verse just a 100 yd zero. So I'm not sure what is better or what I should use? Currently the zero is 100yd.
Thx for any help on this.
 

CB11WYO

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Hmmm you might get a lot of differing opinions on this one...

My criteria would be: What type of shot-taking situations will you be put in most often?

A) A close (point-blank-range) no-time-to-dial-turrets get-your-rifle-up-and-shoot-now type of situation

B) Shot opportunities where target isn't in a hurry to leave and you have time to range and calculate for your variables

Probably some other things to consider as well but that's it in a nutshell for me.
 

smokin502

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Most all shooting is paper or metal targets and nothing moving. I figured point blank is good for hunting deer size animals with like a 8 inch kill area( or whatever the game is) for that quick no dial holdover use. But didn't know if it was better for any reasons for long range practice shooting
 

MMERSS

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I'm getting into long range shooting and have been reading a lot about point blank zero verse just a 100 yd zero. So I'm not sure what is better or what I should use? Currently the zero is 100yd.
Thx for any help on this.

If you are just getting into long range shooting and not sure what zero to use watch this DVD Putting Rounds On Target With Bryan Litz

The reasoning behind certain range zero's are discussed in the DVD along with other good information one should know about long range shooting.
 

Broz

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Townsend, Montana.
I have them all. I zero at 100 because it is easier to find a place to check, and has less interference from environmental conditions. Then if I decide my situation would warrant a 200 or 300 zero I simply crank up the need moa for that point blank scenario and carry it there with the option to change at ant time if needed.

Jeff
 

MOA Chaser

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I usually follow the zero recommendations of the manufacturer. For example, I recently bought some Hornady 6.5 Creedmoor ammo and on the box it had data for 200 yard zero. For some of my magnums, the websites list 300 yard zeros for many of their ballistic charts. So, all of my magnums are zeroed at 300. The rest are zeroed at 200. Basically, I'm shooting 3 inches high at a hundred with everything. I made my own target on a piece of standard 8.5 X 11 paper with 1 inch grids, a black center one inch square, and a heavy highlighted one inch square 3 inches above that. I have access to a copier so I print out as many as I need. I aim dead on at the center and my groups fall into the 3 inch high square. Then I check it at 2 or 300, run the chrono, and work up my dope cards. That way if a critter steps out between say 100 and 300 yards I just aim straight on. And, since I'm already dialed in at 2 or 300 hundred yards to begin with, it doesn't take a lot of turns to crank up to 500 or further. Some may not like it, but it works for me and that is all that matters. :)gun)
 

Bravo 4

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I zero at 100 because it is easier to find a place to check, and has less interference from environmental conditions. Then if I decide my situation would warrant a 200 or 300 zero I simply crank up the need moa for that point blank scenario and carry it there with the option to change at ant time if needed.

Jeff

+1, what I do mostly.
I have a bench with a target set up at exactly 100 yards at my house. I can check my zero at any time. When I'm hunting I may dial up some in case of a quick close-to-medium range shot.
I have one rifle that I currently have zeroed at 400 yards. I did this at a buddy's house to check loads and figured this is gonna be an ELR rifle so I don't need to have a zero closer. That's probably about to change, so I don't have to make a lollipop type target to check the zero. That and it helps if they are all the same zero, less to screw up.
 
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jrsolocam

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ND
I use a 200 yard zero. For all intents and purposes out to 300 its point and shoot on those fast shots. I can dial out to 1,000 on most of my rifles with +/-20 MOA, or one spin on the turret. For checking zero, or load development I just figure 1" high at 100 and its very close...but many systems work, you just commit to it.
 

4xforfun

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All of my rifles are zeroed at 300 (except one). All of my guns are flat shooting (except one). 300 yard zeros keep all of my bullet trajectories inside the upper 4" limit inside of 300 (except one). It is point and shoot out to around 350 will all (but one).

The (one) is a gas gun... a short barreled 7-08 with 150's at around 2600, and it is zeroed at 200.

I hear arguments that "I want to be more precise with my shot placement, so I zero at 100". If that is the case, you are already ranging and dialing ....so....just dial DOWN for shots under 300!! That way , if the need arises you won't need to range and dial up for a snap 300 (or whatever) yard shot. you will be GTG for anything up to 350.....point and shoot.
 

dragman

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Dec 6, 2011
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Vandergrift PA
I dial in @ 100 yards for almost everything. I have one exception and I don't dial that gun at all.
I have been sticking with flat big guns lately and when you can get too 1100 yards in 20MOA on a 100 yard zero I see no reason to zero it out further.
 
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