Best tall tripod for hunting?

Dr. Vette

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Dec 30, 2009
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Holland, MI
We just booked a late season hunt with an outfitter and will be going in early December for elk. This outfitter highly recommends tall shooting sticks or tripods, and uses the Stoney Point ones himself. In addition, he highly recommends purchasing our own set to use and practice with before we go.

Right now we're looking at 3 units. They are

the Stoney Point Explorer Tripod:
Stoney Point - ConvertaPod Explorer Tripod

the Ultrec Quick-Change in camo:
quick change sticks, pro hunter sticks, shooting sticks, ball head, grip action ball head, Wisconsin, WI

and the Bog Gear CLD:
BOGgear.com - Camo Legged Devil Shooting Sticks

Anyone out there who has used one of these units and has input? I've searched the site here as well as Googled them. Stoney Point seems to have reviews but not the other two. We would appreciate any input you have, especially since I hope to order them ASAP.

Thanks!
 

timeless61

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Nov 18, 2008
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I have the bog pod, did not even know the middle one existed until now.

but had looked at the stoney point some, and definitely like the bog pod better. the v bracket rotates, and just seems to work a bit better

also, i believe that the stoney point does not have tab secured legs, they are twist, which i think is a big plus for the bog pod. the bog pod and the other one look very similar.
 

edge

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Nov 4, 2005
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Primos® Trigger Stick™ Tripod

It adjusts to any terrain and height with a squeeze of the trigger. I doubt that anything can beat it for speed....I got one for about $100 on ebay last year and it works as advertised.

I am going to take a set of shooting stix and attach to two of the legs to make a rear rest.

edge.

opplanet-primos-hunting-calls-tall-tripod-trigger-stick-36-5-61-inches-65496.jpg
 
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Dr. Vette

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Primos® Trigger Stick™ Tripod

It adjusts to any terrain and height with a squeeze of the trigger. I doubt that anything can beat it for speed....I got one for about $100 on ebay last year and it works as advertised.

I am going to take a set of shooting stix and attach to two of the legs to make a rear rest.

edge.

My business partner has these and they do work great, but they're about a pound heavier than I'd like (3 pounds, 4 ounces - we weighed them last week). As he notes, they're fine when sitting or in a stand, but who wants to drag around half the weight of a second rifle all day?
 

edge

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If weight is an issue then make some African shooting sticks and use bamboo!
That is what I used before I bought the Primos.....but the Primos is faster to set up for a shot.
In the woods it can't be beat, but for open field shooting where you have time there are other options.

I also have some tall Stoney stix ( 2 legs ), and they are too flimsy in my opinion.

edge.
 

Bravo 4

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The South

I have this system and believe it to be a pretty good piece of gear. It is very light weight and will fit in an assault pack. Very stable for prone, sitting and kneeling. At first I was worried it to be too flimsy when fully extended. After researching the SLIK tripod it comes with I found it to be only rated for 4 or 5 pounds, even though their website has a picture of a 45 pound plate sitting on it. I have shot it standing and no longer have any concerns and will be ordering some for my teams.
 

morpheus32

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Dec 24, 2006
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I have the bog pod tripod. I works extremely well and is not that heavy. I would recommend it for walking. The problem that I found after purchasing a couple of different tripods for various shooting activities is that the more sturdy or rapid adjustable...the heavier it got. If your rifle is a lightweight hunting rifle, you don't need much to help balance...if you have a heavy precision rifle, then you have to go for the more sturdy and thus heavier tripod.

From my experience in Africa, you might want to experiment with tall bipod shooting sticks. I had a nice set (I will have to check the manufacturer) that walked very well and set up in seconds. It was also quick to adjust for height by pushing forward into my hand holding the top of the bipod and the bottom of the rifle.

Also another one from experience. Make sure the head that the rifle sits in, fits your rifle. It is is too small or different angles, you might have to goof around a bit to get it to sit right on the shot. I now prefer the type that has a wide inside and "wings" on the side to hold the rifle. The bog pod is an example.

Good hunting
 

tjbill

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Jan 22, 2006
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Skagit Valley WASHINGTON
I like the idea of getting a "cradle" that attaches to the top of a standard tripod (like the one mentioned). Chances are you are going to be packing a spotting scope, so the tripod can serve double duty. I've made shots using the top of the soptting scope as a rest, but not extremely long distance and not with a heavy rifle, but something to consider. Maybe if you had some type of padding on the top of the spotter?
 

mcseal2

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Dec 16, 2009
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312
I also like the bogpod, it is the steadiest model I've tried. I want to get the switcharoo head for mine to use with my spotting scope also.

A lighter tripod that works well for me is the mossback tripod. They collapse shorter and weigh much less than the bogpod version. The drawback on them is that they have 3 legs bound together at the top with rubber instead of the cradle. It makes it harder to track moving game or change position quickly, but works well if you have a little more time to shoot.

I also like the stoney point rapid pivot bipod, I carry the prone and sitting model on most hunts and can shoot any height up to kneeling comfortably this way. That gets me enough height most places I hunt.

Good luck on your hunt, if I was carrying them up a mountain and just needed to shoot standing I'd choose the mossback. I would carry it in my Eberlestock scabbard until I might need it quickly. If I wanted to be able to use the tripod with a spotting scope also I'd carry the bogpod with the switcharoo head instead.
 

geo4061

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Jun 25, 2014
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Southern Oklahoma
When seconds count the spring loaded legs of the Primos are the way to go. They can even be deployed with one hand. True they are heavy but got us in the action quickly and helped our success on a recent hog hunt.
 

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