Best bullet release/neck tension?

Discussion in 'Reloading' started by Lonewolf74, May 16, 2018.

  1. Lonewolf74

    Lonewolf74 Well-Known Member

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    Looking for everyone's process and opinions on how to get the best, most consistent bullet release and low ES, SD?

    For example I stopped tumbling or ultrasonic cleaning my brass to leave the carbon in the necks. I then apply sizing wax in the neck due to info on a thread over on LRO. People reported better results using this over the dry graphite lube. I don't anneal yet but it is the next venture on my list in pursuit of consistent reloads.

    So what are your processes and tricks? Do any of you achieve single digit ES and very low SD?
     
  2. lancetkenyon

    lancetkenyon Well-Known Member

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    I FL size, tumble in walnut, and anneal every time. Usually in the .002-.003' neck tension range. Excellent results for accuracy and low ES & SD.
     
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  3. cohunt

    cohunt Well-Known Member

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    Im playing with that right now in my 7 mag--I'm pretty sure its going to be a unique animal based on your own brass, chamber, bullet, dies used, case prep, necks annealed/turned or not--etc

    From everything ive read the general consensus is .001-.002 for most bolt guns/most brass, and .003 for semi auto ( to prevent bullet setback with out crimping)--I did read an article where a guy actually extensively tested from .001-.006" and he said that anything over .003" consistently gave him less accuracy in all his testing situations

    but if you anneal you may need a bit more, if your brass neck thickness is thin you may need a bit more, its going to tarry for each rifle/brass/bullet/die combination
     
  4. Lonewolf74

    Lonewolf74 Well-Known Member

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    Another question I forgot to ask is how many experience what they believe is the "cold weld" issue? Where it seems ES, SD and even accuracy goes to pot with rounds loaded several months or years earlier.
     
    Last edited: May 16, 2018
  5. Mikecr

    Mikecr Well-Known Member

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    Consistent bullet release is easy. learning what a cartridge likes is another matter. What cartridge are you taking this to?

    That's stupid right there. The best move you're making is to leave the carbon layer alone. If you're experiencing tough bullet seating with this, stop neck sizing excessively.
    But either way this means nothing to bullet release, ES, or SD.
     
  6. Lonewolf74

    Lonewolf74 Well-Known Member

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    Mike it's not for any one cartridge or even really any problem I have, just in pursuit of tighter ES and wondering what people's process is.

    From what I understand consistent neck tension and bullet release (they're not the same but certainly directly related) are the single biggest factors in achieving low ES. Of course I'm talking once the load is in a node so you are trying to bring an ES of say 16 down to 8-9, not trying to make bad ES good.

    I have much to test and learn, I'm sure it'll take me years before I have a set routine and even then I hope to continue to test and learn. I know so far applying the sizing wax to the necks on top of leaving the carbon in (not just leaving the carbon) has been the single biggest factor in lowering ES as well as getting my seating depth dead nuts 90% of the time when seating bullets.
     
  7. elf

    elf Active Member

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    Every time I reload, I run a bronze brush into the neck. I would never add any compound to the neck. If you do that, how do you measure the thickness of the film you leave in the neck?
     
  8. WildRose

    WildRose Well-Known Member

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    Wet tumble and then after seating I use a light crimp with a Lee Crimping die.
    I have yet to find anything give better consistency or do more to tighten up my groups.
     
  9. DUSTY NOGGIN

    DUSTY NOGGIN Well-Known Member

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    turning the whole batch to the same neck thickness , will do the same thing ... that lube will end up in the barrel
     
  10. Lonewolf74

    Lonewolf74 Well-Known Member

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    I have thought about this but in reality would it actually? I don't know for sure myself but when I apply it I go back through every case with a q-tip to wipe out any excess so it's a very minute fine layer left. I would think the tiny amount there would burn off if anything.
     
  11. Lonewolf74

    Lonewolf74 Well-Known Member

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    The crimp is another thing I want to test more. I have definitely seen the crimp improve consistency in so so loads. In the loads I have more dialed in i can't say I saw any improvement, though no negative effects either.
     
  12. WildRose

    WildRose Well-Known Member

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    A few years ago I had a bunch of factor ammo loaded with bullets I didn't want to shoot at game.

    I used a collet bullet puller then instead of dumping powder, resizing and reloading I just dropped the bullets I wanted to use in and crimped them.

    Prior to the crimp of course I had very minimal neck tension, I could almost seat the bullets by hand adequately without even running them through the bullet seater.

    I did of course to ensure consistent COAL, but just put a light crimp on them to keep them from moving during carry in the mag or when loading from same via bolt operation.

    These proved to be phenomenally accurate loads.

    That is where the idea originally came from.

    There's a good thread or two somewhere here on crimping where others shared similar results.
     
  13. Mikecr

    Mikecr Well-Known Member

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    There is no set reason crimping or higher/lower tension would 'help' until load development shows it. That it just happens to help/hurt here & there is luck (good/bad).
     
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  14. Greyfox

    Greyfox Well-Known Member

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    I also prefer to leave a carbon residue inside the neck, tumbling with corn cob or walnut media. My neck tensions run .0015-.0025”for most of my loads, paying very close attention to be sure my seating pressure is light, smooth, and consistent. I have been able to keep runouts and ES very low. I prefer to avoid annealing whenever possible finding that the more resistant surface structure that results inside the neck wreaks havoc with achieving the consistent seating tension I’m able to achieve simply leaving the carbon surface left after tumbling. While a controversial subject, I’m not totally convinced of the virtues of annealing, and feel this may be dependent on the particular brand of brass that is used. Being an alloy, they are not all created equal.