Berger VLD pencil through Elk in Cold?

isaaccarlson

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Bullets slow down faster when they are going faster. Most of your speed drops off in the first 200-300 yards. Look at an energy graph and you'll see exactly what I mean. You can have a bazillion ft lbs at the muzzle, but it drops like a rock from there out. Energy is dependent on speed. Double the speed, get 4 times more energy. It works in reverse too, with drag absorbing energy from the bullet, and the faster the bullet goes, the more energy it loses per ft of travel.

A 22lr loses about 100 fps every 100 yards. A 22-250 loses almost 1,000 fps in the first 200 yards. Other calibers and bullets will vary, but you get the idea. At 300 yards, the bullet has lost a good part of it's steam and will slow down slower.
 
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L.Sherm

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Bullets slow down faster when they are going faster. Most of your speed drops off in the first 200-300 yards. Look at an energy graph and you'll see exactly what I mean. You can have a bazillion ft lbs at the muzzle, but it drops like a rock from there out. Energy is dependent on speed. Double the speed, get 4 times more energy. It works in reverse too, with drag absorbing energy from the bullet, and the faster the bullet goes, the more energy it loses per ft of travel.

A 22lr loses about 100 fps every 100 yards. A 22-250 loses almost 1,000 fps in the first 200 yards. Other calibers and bullets will vary, but you get the idea. At 300 yards, the bullet has lost a good part of it's steam and will slow down slower.
Your comparing a lemon to a Watermelon,
I've shot plenty of Deer and elk farther than 2x+ what the O.P is talking about the Bergers DRT everything.
My Nephews 7 mag runs the 180 Berger at 2950 and he's shot ELK, Caribou, Moose and deer along ways out there and same results as mine.
 

isaaccarlson

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I was simply making an example of energy and velocity. I did say speed, but meant energy. A good portion of energy is lost in the first several hundred yards. If a given bullet loses too much, it may not perform as desired beyond that range.
 

L.Sherm

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I was simply making an example of energy and velocity. I did say speed, but meant energy. A good portion of energy is lost in the first several hundred yards. If a given bullet loses too much, it may not perform as desired beyond that range.
Like I said trying to compare a 22LR or 22-250 to a 7 mag 180 Berger at 300 yards is not even in the same league.
A 180 has about 2600 lbs of energy at 300 a 85 grain 22 cal bullet has about
1400.
 

rickiesrevenge

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Apr 14, 2015
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Alaska
I've annealed berger bullets tips. My testing showed it allowed them to expand more reliably. I used wet news print for the test medium. Shot them at 1800fps +/- from a 7mm TCU. ALL of the annealed ones opened up. I had some of the un annealed not.

Aaron
 

KurtB

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Feb 11, 2004
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Colorado
My Berger experience is deep with 6.5 140 hunting vld launched from 2600 fps to 2900 fps. Dozens of antelope, mule deer, whitetail, mountain goat, and black bears. Buddy and son have used same on bull elk. Always had emphatic kills and no lost animals.

I don't check tips, I don't anneal. For me they have just always worked. I shoot them to the max distance I can maintain 1900 fps so I get bullet upset. Couldn't tell you the energy amount.

Son has also used Lapua 180 grain scenars in 7mm for elk shot at 2900 or so fps. Great results there too.
 

Wanashoot

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Nov 2, 2016
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Texas
Nothing is fool proof or perfect. I was shooting them out of a 6.5 at 2700 fps and the longest shot was around 100 yrds. I had 3 or 4 failures until I figured out I was just poking holes and everything was running off. I might have got a bad batch but I do not have time when hunting to examine each bullet to make sure they are not plugged or have been bumped from recoil. If you are hunting and have lost confidence in them and will no longer use them for hunting since there are many other options. For those that use them thats your choice and I hope they work for you.
 

FEENIX

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Great Falls, MT
Do you check any of your equipment before you go hunting?
Do you just shoot factory ammo?
Yep! When I hand load them, I check every bullet; it is not a race for me. And on my hunt, I do a visual inspection of the bullet for any obstruction or anything that might affect its performance, and it only takes a few seconds while I load them to the magazine, but that’s just me.
 

Wanashoot

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Nov 2, 2016
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I shoot hand loads and I weigh each load and measure the Length. I also make sure every shell will cycle through my gun before I box them. I check zero if I use another batch of powder or if gun is dropped or bumped hard. If I spend the money on fuel, license, and grub to go hunting I try to eliminate all the possible failures I can. This year I went Elk hunting in Colorado and only had one shot at a Bull. I got the Bull but had confidence that everything I had done to prepare would work. I did not shoot with the 6.5 I used a 300 Win Mag with 190 gr Accubonds. But that is part of my prep. I figure with the 300 I have more chance of not trailing but still need to make the proper shot. I hunt smaller game with 6.5 and larger with 300. I have quit a few but these two have became my standbys.
 

mmacfive

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Nov 19, 2015
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I’d love to see some pictures of Partitions you’ve pulled out of elk that could be loaded again.
 
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