Bear protection handguns?

HARPERC

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For general knowledge, bears aren't true hibernators. They go into a slumber but can wake and kill as necessary. Especially brown/grizzly bears. Black bears are way less apt to come to life in kill mode. They go into a real slumber in their dens. Brown bear - not so much.
Both are active to a degree dependent on food supply. At the height of the wolves killing elk in Yellowstone some big boar grizzlies stayed up feasting on wolf kills.

Where there is overlap the grizzlies are active earlier, and are prone to dig up black bears for an early snack.

Black bears also wander around in the winter, while cat hunting here, we cut as big a black bear track as I've seen, December 22, plenty of snow cover.

A dangerous situation exists when these bears don't have the required reserves to lay up for the winter. Other cases on file, but this one is from a respected member, that hopefully will respond as well.

 

VLD Pilot

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Article said the guy had bear spray but was never able to use it. Didn't provide details but I'm thinking had it in a day pack rather than an accessible holster.

Bear bit him on one arm. The man retreated into the Kenai River in an effort to survive. The bear followed him into the river and bit him again on a shoulder. Then the bear left. Said the guy didn't suffer life threatening injuries.

Would have been all sorts of time to get a revolver or pistol into this fight had one been carried externally in a holster. Folks keep betting their lives on the one in a million odds. And then become the "one".
Considering the fish and games odds being one in 2.1 million, him being the one (in this case) and based on your assessment of his chances had he had a defense sidearm, has to make him think twice before making that same mistake. Again, not sure those odds numbers are very accurate. I'd say the numbers or odds are still fairly low of an attack but there much higher than one in two million. Looking like the danger these days isn't just in the big cities where death and injury rates are higher than ever. Seems the alaskan bush has its own record highs.
 

VLD Pilot

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Alaska has a total population of ~ 700,000. Well less than 1 million. We have multiple bear attacks every season the bears are out of hibernation.

Sometimes bear attacks have occured mid-winter. I remember at least 3 incidents where bears were disturbed in their dens. Accidentally disturbed twice. The one was purposeful harassment of the bear.
The last incident was only ~3yrs ago. Two guys playing on snow machines on the Kenai Peninsula disturbed a boar in mid-winter. The bear came out after them. He was easy to spot against 3 foot of snow. They escaped on their snow machines. Brown bear season was open year round. So they retrieved rifles, licenses, and brown bear tags, and returned to go bear hunting. No big surprise the boar comes after them again. This time they were prepared and killed it.

The one incident where a big brown bear was harassed in its den by a group of oilfield contract workers resulted in the death of a Mexican. It was a siesmograph team setting off explosive charges and collecting readings. Some of the workers had noticed a bear den and threw snowballs at the den. They contined on and the last guy comes past the den was the Mexican worker. I don't think he even knew the den was there. Just plodding along catching up to his co-workers. The boar comes out of its den, crushes the man's shull with one bite (instant kill), then flattens his body into the snow by pouncing on him repetitively with front paws. The workers that threw the snowballs were some distance up ahead, but close enough to hear the screams just before the bear killed their co-worker. They turned in time to watch the bear kill. They quickly climbed up in some nearby trees and stayed put until well after the bear left. Bad deal for the man pulling up the end of the line.

For general knowledge, bears aren't true hibernators. They go into a slumber but can wake and kill as necessary. Especially brown/grizzly bears. Black bears are way less apt to come to life in kill mode. They go into a real slumber in their dens. Brown bear - not so much.
Your right. Black bears do go into a deeper metabolic depressive state. Wolves here pull bears from dens and kill them. No fight, no defense. Mostly killing cubs but sows are killed most times as well. I have seen bears out in winter when the season is mild but that's a rare occasion.
 

phorwath

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That could be so. But a lot of those city folks probably never saw a bear in their lives other than Winnie the Pooh. They make easy pickens for a bad tempered bear.

A number a maulings have occurred on trails on the outskirts of Anchorage, when City folks walk without firearm protection. So not sure how it all shakes out.

Wouldn't surprise me to learn the man with the Border Collie was from Anchorage. That area has a LOT of bears, and it's closed to bear hunting. So the bears are used to being in the presence of humans fishing the river. The Kenai River has a massive run of red salmon, with early run reds currently in the river headed upstream to the Russian River. Begging for bear trouble lollygagging around there with a free ranging dog.
 

phorwath

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But there's not a doubt the lifetime odds here in Alaska are WAY less than 1 : 1,000,000.

Those odds are defeated multiple times in Alaska on an annual basis. Those 1 to 2.1million odds are nothing more than the US Forest Service luring folks into bear country with feel-good statistics.
 

VLD Pilot

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But there's not a doubt the lifetime odds here in Alaska are WAY less than 1 : 1,000,000.

Those odds are defeated multiple times in Alaska on an annual basis. Those 1 to 2.1million odds are nothing more than the US Forest Service luring folks into bear country with feel-good statistics.
Exactly. It's smoke and mirrors really. Those odds are in the 100,000s not millions. Let's face it, numbers aren't something most people refer to before venturing into the wilds. Most have the mentality " It won't happen to me". That may be why it "Did" happen to them.
 

VLD Pilot

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Treeslug

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If Brett did not have a family or anyone to miss him, I say cut his head off and let the rest of him rot, but that would not be fair to those who love him. However, there are only so many 700 pound black bears left in the world,
 

phorwath

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I doubt the bears would miss him.

From his criminal track record, sounds like a boy every Mom would be proud of.

His Mom might not miss him either...
 
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