Basic starter kit for 7mm REM MAG specifically

judgebill

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Some things to think about. First, as has been said by many, get two (or more) reloading manuals. You will find some differences in recommended loads but most all will be consistent in the steps required, and the safety to be used in reloading. Each step will be explained and demonstrated. Study this well.
You will quickly realize that any specific loads might not work as well as others. Which means, over time, quite a few trips to the range to test your loads. That is challenging in the LA area because there aren't that many ranges around. The alternative is to load 3-5 cartridges with the same load, then another 3-5 with another load and so on until you have a number of different loads (using diff weights of same powder, diff bullets, etc.). DON'T RUSH. Take your time because the next hunting season is quite a ways off and you have plenty of time to develop accurate loads. You may well find your two rifles use different loads.
Spend time on this website and look at other shooting/reloading sites and you will pick up a lot of information. People are pretty friendly and ready to help with information.
As for equipment, there's a lot of good stuff out there. By following this website and others you will read about different brands that are considered reliable and accurate. You can load acceptable ammo with minimum equipment. To get really exceptional ammo may require exceptional (i.e., expensive) equipment. You Tube has videos comparing different types of equipment. Spend some time looking. And, if possible, find someone who lives nearby who can give you practical help.
Good luck. You're embarking on a journey that can provide you with a lot of fun and enjoyment and not a few challenges.
 

Dosh

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Bought my son a RCBS Rockchucker set 13 years ago. He now only has the press left. Replaced the other accessories with upgrades. My point is I agree with others the kits are not complete and usually not great for accuracy.
 

jasonco

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Send best guidance: Don’t buy Lee. They make some usable stuff, but not good stuff.
Are they for hyper accurate case sizing, yes, no maybe? I use still use a couple sets for reloading. Do I use them for my custom barreled rifles, hellll azzzz noooo!

OP was asking about, getting started with handloading. My advice is, don't buy premium shizzle, unless you know to optimize the tool, which comes with practice and time.
 

nksmfamjp

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I guess my point was there are no primers and powder is harder that hell to acquire! So, take time and collect the ”right stuff”. Like…..

Dry tumbler or ultrasonic
Sinclair CBTD and CBTO tools
Basic digital calipers
Basic micrometer
MEC Marksman
Redding or Forster Die sets
shellholder
case trimmer….I like Wilson for bolt rifle.
digital powder scale you can trickle into
With powder dippers or powder measure
With powder trickler
or powder dispenser
boxes and labeling
 

Far North Hunter

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I would also recommend reaching out via this forum to see if anyone lives near you and would be willing to help you get started via in-person training at their place with their equipment. If they are reloading with high end equipment they might be able to offer some deals on their older equipment as a bonus.
I would support the recommendation to sit with an experienced reloader. I am positive someone close to you would be most willing to spend an evening discussing your ambition and the equipment to get you off on a right foot. As a added bonus, if that person could sit with you and your equipment on your maiden voyage, you will be provided a wealth of instruction and confidence.
If you have not already, source a couple reloading manuals, then read and study there beginners guidance. It’s priceless guidance.
And..HAVE FUN IN YOUR ADVENTURE!!
 

cajun

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Dec 11, 2007
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609
Ok - so I pulled the trigger-

Just bought this - $148 on amazon at the moment, I was going to spend that on a standalone press nevermind the extras..

71CY2+8q1TL._AC_SL1500_.jpg




and the plate part Lee Precision 90911 - Load-Master Progressive Press Shellplate, 5L (7mm Remington Magnum, 300 Winchester Magnum, 338 Winchester Magnum)

and the 4 die set for 7mm Rem mag- the press comes with lock rings which I can swap- Hope I didnt miss anything. It looks complicated but i think I will manage.
Not what I would recommend for a beginner. You can use it as a single but it adds some variables you really dont need.
 

Citified

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Dec 27, 2016
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Location
California
Congratulations on your new rifles. The 7mm RM is a great caliber and will do most anything you need. I read all the posts here and the one item I don’t think was emphasized is how scarce components are at this time. Please find that reloading manual and attempt to acquire compensation early on.
For what it’s worth, I lived in SoCal most of my life until we moved to Oregon this year.
Your can search Burro Canyon shooting range and Lytle Creek firing range for places to practice.
 

SSgt G Cody

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Feb 23, 2020
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Asheville, NC
Hi. I teach reloading here locally, and I would highly recommend the Lee Combo Reloading kits! Good place to start! I also highly recommend the Lee Collet Dies! They are much more accurate than most! I like the Lee and Hornady manuals. For the 7RM you might try H4350 and R26 powders. Maybe the 160gn AB for you, and 130-140gn for your wife. CCI or Win primers. Stick to mid range loads to start, then work up toward max later. I'd start shooting with Hornady factory loads for now. Good luck!
 

nksmfamjp

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I agree with only one thing on your "right stuff" list. Maybe your opinion is just that?
I should be clear. That is the “right stuff” for me. You and the OP are free to buy anything you want. I’m just suggesting that instead of a kit, that the op spend time thinking through each and every item like we all do eventually.
 

Taylorbok

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Apr 19, 2021
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Sask
I should be clear. That is the “right stuff” for me. You and the OP are free to buy anything you want. I’m just suggesting that instead of a kit, that the op spend time thinking through each and every item like we all do eventually.
This. I have ended up spending unnecessary time and money on certain items because I didn't do enough research. (should have bought a giraud instead of my frakford case prep) at the same time let your goals dictate what you need. No sense buying a V4 auto thrower and fx-120i if you are gonna shoot 50rds a year and be happy with 1moa groups. If you are gonna shoot 50 rounds a week and chase accuracy you are probably going to want some more precision equipment that will also expedite your process
 

Pointman

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Aug 12, 2017
Messages
159
One thing I recently have added to my equipment are Sinclair's case gauges with the section cut out. It allows visual confirmation of headspace and case length. It also gives you an idea of where the projectile will be in relation to the rifling. I was having issues with stiff bolts on my rifles, mainly the .308 and the 338LM. It showed that I had not bumped" the shoulders sufficiently for easy bolt closure. Not all cartridges have the cut-out gauges as an option but those that do are the most popular.
 
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