Basic starter kit for 7mm REM MAG specifically

LVJ76

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First off, in CA lead bullets are NOT allowed for hunting, meaning you need all copper bullets. You can practice with lead core bullets if I am not mistaken, but you cannot hunt with them.

I agree its best to piece your equipment, don't get a kit.

I have mostly RCBS components and they have worked great. For the 7mm Rem Mag you might need to get a Larry Willis Belted Magnum Collet Resizing die, might.

Agree as well to get several reloading manuals.

You can search for information here or ask and you'll get plenty of answers. Good luck
 

MagnumManiac

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When starting out, number 1 is a quality beam scale….this may blow your budget right from the get-go.
I disagree with NOT buying a kit. Generally, they come with everything you need except the die set.
I would look for a RCBS RockChucker Supreme kit, they offer them all the time with a rebate. One of these is of very good quality and can be easily expanded.
I started out with a secondhand 1960’s era RockChucker, a cheap beam scale that proved to be out by more than a grain! When I went to the 375H&H, the RockChucker was seriously lacking in space and I squished my fingers on more than several occasions.
Buy Once, Cry Once is what I say.

Cheers.
 
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CamaroMan

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Hi all thanks! Wife has a beam scale - I also have a high precision one for piston weight matching.

Looking at this Lee die kit - will I need all these or can I get by with the 2 die sets?

81mCD4dKC5L._AC_SL1500_.jpg


6122uy5sWlL._AC_SL1200_.jpg
 

Carlos88

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Hi all thanks! Wife has a beam scale - I also have a high precision one for piston weight matching.

Looking at this Lee die kit - will I need all these or can I get by with the 2 die sets?

81mCD4dKC5L._AC_SL1500_.jpg


6122uy5sWlL._AC_SL1200_.jpg

Whatever you decide about the dies make sure they have lock rings. The ones supplied are worthless.
 

Carlos88

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Do the ones in the yellow case have lock rings? or not? could u show a pic?

Im considering this kit -



basic but has enough to get one started or not?


 

CamaroMan

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Ok - so I pulled the trigger-

Just bought this - $148 on amazon at the moment, I was going to spend that on a standalone press nevermind the extras..

71CY2+8q1TL._AC_SL1500_.jpg




and the plate part Lee Precision 90911 - Load-Master Progressive Press Shellplate, 5L (7mm Remington Magnum, 300 Winchester Magnum, 338 Winchester Magnum)

and the 4 die set for 7mm Rem mag- the press comes with lock rings which I can swap- Hope I didnt miss anything. It looks complicated but i think I will manage.
 

WYOHTF

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I’m not gonna repeat a bunch of this but any of the Lee kits are a great place to start
Sure
You will or may mature out of them, but know that some of the best benchrest shooters rely mostly on Lee reloading equipment
When I read your first post i immediately caught on to “it’s been thirty years- both got 7 mags”
That’s a lot of recoil to step back into or learn from new, especially in a Tikka. Get a decent shoulder pad, especially for the Mrs.
Tikka stock pads stink
I’d really consider getting a smaller caliber to build confidence, use less components. Saving the funds for higher quality gear as the hobby progressed. Crap, primers are .10 a piece or better these days.
Just my opinion based on your OP
Good luck and stay safe

And I second reading up on good reloading manuals
 

CamaroMan

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thanks wyohtf- they come with pretty soft ones, mine actually has the muzzle brake and is a little heavier so maybe she will steal mine :) she is a tough cookie, at 6ft2 I think she will handle it but yes- i was looking into loading the 208 variants to start but maybe will just try lower gr maybe 130-ish and go from there ..
 

Boarman03

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thanks - yes i will be going with Lee dies and a compatible loader - i am doing alot of reading on it. There are Lee die kits for 30-40, loaders 100-200, shell holder 15, dont the priming/chamfer tool comes in the die kits (just an extra step)? I dont care how long it takes we arent shooting off tons of ammo- but will be going to the range on occasion to prep for hunting season :) id say a reasonable initial investment 200-250 would be "ideal" - and go from there

I really also dont mind weighing grain on my scale and doing it by hand - i would find it very relaxing, not trying to speed anything up - quite the opposite. fwiw I live in LA if that makes sense!
The scale used for reloading is a special scale that reads grains, NOT GRAMS! Big difference. I think it's wonderful you want to learn to reload.
The dies are just dies only, but Lee supplies a shell holder and a seldom used measuring spoon in some of their dies. Different companie's dies work basically the same but can have minor technical differences. That's where some of the self education comes in. But it typically only matters to the guys who are wanting competition results or are shooting long distances well over 200 yards.
Reloading is a serious venture not only in equipment cost but in the importance of being extremely careful. The wrong powder or too much powder (even a few grains too much) can stress and damage your rifle receiver or rarely much worse - perhaps even cause serious personal injury. Read, study and learn first! And avoid any distractions or impairment, not to mention flames or static discharges, while reloading. Powder and powder dust can be very explosive. It pays to double check what you are doing. Just use great care and good old common sense, ALWAYS!
But, when done right, it all but guarantees you accurate and sufficient ammo to hunt or protect yourself with. Certainly broadens your understanding about how guns in general operate.
It's a very sober undertaking but can be very fun and rewarding as well.
Your equipment needs and costs will normally depend on the level of technical accuracy you wish to achieve consistently. For some it is a life long adventure and extreme expense. For most hunters, the basic equipment mentioned before should be pretty sufficient. Research, read, research and read, and then purchase after getting past all of the marketing.
Good luck and best wishes.
 

Mark37082

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I purchased the Lee Ultimate die set as my first 7RM dies. It works and the crimp die is nice to have even if you upgrade down the road to higher quality dies. I may have missed it, but you will definitely need a quality caliper. This will be the most used tool in your reloading. I quickly found out that there were many things I needed when I first started reloading. Many of these tools and supplies were inexpensive individually. Hornady makes reasonable tools for measuring things such as base to ogive and shoulder bump that will make your reloads more consistent and accurate. Case prep will consume a significant amount of your reloading time. Invest in the hand tools to prep the brass. A basic reloading manual will list all the required tools and supplies you will need to get started.
Welcome to the reloading world.
 

jbenevides89

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I would have suggested a MEC for a single stage setup if your focus is rifle rounds. They come highly reviewed and when you are starting out the single stage will help keep you out of trouble. It forces you to go one step at a time. You prep all your brass, you prime all your brass, you put your powder in and seat your bullets.

a good set of calipers is an absolute must.
a good scale whether its a beam or digital is a must. I have a Frankford Arsenal digital that was like 20 bucks and its just as accurate as my RCBS chargemaster.
the lee dies work fine, I have a set for my 7 mag. There is nothing fancy and they are what I started with. I recently came across some rounds I loaded with the basic beam scale, lee dies, and had no CBTO measuring tools and when I checked them out years later after getting all the better equipment they were pretty dang consistent.

Components are going to be the tough part. Bite the bullet and spend the $120 for the thousand primer bricks that come up because you are dead in the water without them. 7mm hunting bullets are scarce as well. I think the tikka is 1:9.5 twist so you are going to be looking for the 175 and under weights I am assuming.
 

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