Barnes X vs TSX vs LRX

cowboybart

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Apr 23, 2022
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I'll be back working in a month. It is hard to work when you can't move your dominant arm w/o pain. Can't move the shifter in the truck or the sticks in the dozer or loader. The loader is what got me into this situation - well not really - the loader didn't roll on it's side by itself!!

Thanx for the x55 data. Is there any 250 Savage data in that book??
 

Mike Matteson

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Due to a shoulder injury, magnums are out for at least a year. I might try to harvest some animals with a 30-30 AI Contender, but my other choice is a 6.5x47 Lapua. The Lapua is built on a Sako 75 action and I have never shot it. I will be shooting it left handed this year, and off of a bipod. While digging up components, I have selected the Barnes X (original X) 120gr XFB and IMR 4064 powder. All of my manuals talk about loading the TSX .050" or better off of the lands. I would assume this would be true for the original X as well.
Anybody remember anything special about the original X bullets that I might need to know?? I don't want different bullet/powder recommendations, because this is what I have on hand, so this is what will get used. I'm sure with this combo I will find a load that is minute of antelope at 3-350 yds.
I would like input on distances from the lands, for this bullet.
Get a muzzle brake on the 6.5x47. I have a Ruger Mark 11 .338WM that was a friend of mine. Its a tack drive, I would shot the rifle for groups for him. But at the same time it was a shoulder kicker. I went as far as putting in a trigger for him for an 8# to about 1.5# trigger. It help, but still kicked, but a little easier to deal with. I purchased it a couple of years later, because of how accurate it is. I finely had a brake put on it. It changed it completely. Now it my go to rifle for big game. It was like night and day with the brake. I've had both of my shoulder replaced now.
 

73amag

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Jul 20, 2022
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Navarro County, Tx
After taking 40+animals with the TSX and TTSX bullets and having no problems with terminal performance, I switched to the LRX bullets because they seem to mushroom slightly faster. I've taken two elk with them in a 280 AI 145 gr and the wound channel was almost identical in a 420 yd shot and a 100 yd shot. As with the TSX and TTSX bullets, the LRX exited with a petal shaped hole in the far side hide. That said, I hope to give the Hammers a try this season to see for myself how they work on elk and deer.

As far as the older X-bullets are concerned, the very early ones were hard to seat consistently because the ogives were so inconsistent. About two or three years after their introduction, this was corrected and subsequent bullets were perfect. TSX. TTSX and LRX bullets have been some of the most accurate bullets I have found.
So I recently found some LRX bullets in 200 grain .30 caliber and thought I would use them in my .300 wsm. Then I found Barnes data saying to use them in 1:9 twist only. My wsm is 1:10. So do I return those bullets or will they stabilize when fired from a 1:10 twist? How would the 200 gr LRX load over Superformance powder?
 

cabelasken

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So I recently found some LRX bullets in 200 grain .30 caliber and thought I would use them in my .300 wsm. Then I found Barnes data saying to use them in 1:9 twist only. My wsm is 1:10. So do I return those bullets or will they stabilize when fired from a 1:10 twist? How would the 200 gr LRX load over Superformance powder?
I would try them to see if they shoot in your rifle. I believe they make a 175 gr LRX for .30 caliber also, but I don't know the twist recommended for it. I do know the 168 TTSX bullets work great in my 300 WSM with a 1 in 10 twist. I've taken 5 elk and a like number of bucks with it. All one shot kills.
 

mnoland30

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Dec 24, 2010
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I have a 7-30 Waters Contender carbine. I've killed 4 aoudad with it shooting 120 TTSX. It is a joy to shoot. When my shoulder was messed up, I just used the other shoulder. Not good for quick shots, but off the bipod, it worked just fine with my muzzleloader.
 

med358-boise

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I seem to recall that the original Barnes X bullets had reduced charge weights compared to grooved TSX bullets. I would email Barnes for load data and suggestions, they are usually pretty responsive.
That is is somewhat true but later turned out to be inaccuarte. Barnes stated prior to actually releasing load data for the TSX that the TSX could probably be loaded 1-2 grains hotter. However, when they released actual load data it was all over the map - some a liitle lower, a lot of it equal, some a little hotter.
 

med358-boise

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Here is the Barnes data from Manual Number 3 (last X bullet manual) for the 260 remington (obviously a larger case) but can be used for "triangulation". 260 rem IMR4064 120 grn XFB 34.0-38.0 So the way I would use this data is that max load could be around the low to mid 36s for the 6.5x47.

Hodgdon Lists 123 grn loads for the 6.5x47 with IMR4064 33.1-36.4 another data point for "triangulation". So, the way I look at this data is that is that while it is the wrong bullet it is close in weight so starting below it by a couple grains is appropriate.

Given the above: I would load a few "safety check" rounds with 120 grn X in your 6.5x47 @ 31, 31.5, & 32.0 If I saw no pressure issues, I would start load devlopment at 32.0. This is my opinion and my personal risk tolerances applied. Your risk tolerances may be different. You could use a similar approach and start as an example at 28.5 or 29 with safety check rounds and you may want to load two rounds at each weight.

There is no IMR4064 load data for the 250 Savage in that manual for any appropriate bullet weight.
 
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