Badlands Precision Bullets thread - From BC to terminal ballistics

Wedgy

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So why do they list their .375 caliber 379 grain and 407 grain VLD bullets?

Is the stabilization calculation not just a math formula?
It was in something Litz said in an article I read, it also mention target vs hunting stability.
 

Northkill

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It was in something Litz said in an article I read, it also mention target vs hunting stability.
So many variables. My experience would indicate that hitting a non-consistent medium - such as an animal - can result in a petal breaking off one side and not the other, for example. Or the petals can open to different degrees. When this happens, it'll steer the bullet off course pretty quickly. Over-spinning them will increase the odds of keeping it going in a straighter penetration path. It's what happens after/during penetration that somewhat changes the stability factor requirement of a hunting use bullet vs a target use bullet.
 

Wedgy

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So many variables. My experience would indicate that hitting a non-consistent medium - such as an animal - can result in a petal breaking off one side and not the other, for example. Or the petals can open to different degrees. When this happens, it'll steer the bullet off course pretty quickly. Over-spinning them will increase the odds of keeping it going in a straighter penetration path. It's what happens after/during penetration that somewhat changes the stability factor requirement of a hunting use bullet vs a target use bullet.
I run 6.5-7 in my 6mm'5, 7T in my 6.5's, 7T in .30's and 8T in my .338's pretty my all custom order barrels.
 

SheepShapeAK

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Got my .375 freedom seeds today.

Left to right.

.308 195gn, .338 250gn, .338 275gn, .375 365gn, .375 390gn

DE19931D-CB98-4D8E-BFCF-C6535633D580.jpeg
 

akmtnhnt

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So why do they list their .375 caliber 379 grain and 407 grain VLD bullets?

Is the stabilization calculation not just a math formula?
It is just math, but something that most people don't take into account is they put in the full length of a bullet like the bulldozers, but the tip, being aluminum messes with it. The calculator assumes a single density. Aluminum weighs so little, it's more accurate to just take the length of the tip off the length you put in the calculator.
 

nralifer

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It is just math, but something that most people don't take into account is they put in the full length of a bullet like the bulldozers, but the tip, being aluminum messes with it. The calculator assumes a single density. Aluminum weighs so little, it's more accurate to just take the length of the tip off the length you put in the calculator.
We calculate the stability by subtracting from the total length or the bullet half the tip length since aluminum is denser than plastic.
 

akmtnhnt

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We calculate the stability by subtracting from the total length or the bullet half the tip length since aluminum is denser than plastic.
Ya, I figured you guys knew what you were doing. I was more referencing the online stability calculators like the one on Berger's site and JBM. Though jbm does take plastic tips into account.
 

FEENIX

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Ya, I figured you guys knew what you were doing. I was more referencing the online stability calculators like the one on Berger's site and JBM. Though jbm does take plastic tips into account.
Perhaps Berger made their calculator specifically for their bullets (no tips/inserts), and JBM did not. 🤣
Got my .375 freedom seeds today.

Left to right.

.308 195gn, .338 250gn, .338 275gn, .375 365gn, .375 390gn

View attachment 372708
They are just plain sexy. 🤣 I hope to use the 250/275 on my .338 upcoming build.
 

nralifer

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So many variables. My experience would indicate that hitting a non-consistent medium - such as an animal - can result in a petal breaking off one side and not the other, for example. Or the petals can open to different degrees. When this happens, it'll steer the bullet off course pretty quickly. Over-spinning them will increase the odds of keeping it going in a straighter penetration path. It's what happens after/during penetration that somewhat changes the stability factor requirement of a hunting use bullet vs a target use bullet.
Your thinking is in the right place. As a bullet trasitions into a denser media, like what happens from air to gel or air to animal, stability starts to decrease at the same time the petals are deploying which then could steer the bullet depending on the symmetry of the deployment and whether or not it hits a bone head on or obliquely. Usually in the first 10” the bullet path is fairly straight. Most animals are 10” wide or less at the chest excluding the thickness of the pelt. Oblique impacts, also refered to as quartering shots, can have less predictable in-animal trajectories due to longer in-animal paths, but for copper bullets that expand reliably and quickly, these types of hits through the chest tend to be very rapidly fatal, requiring little or no tracking since bilateral lung damage is extensive, and the probability of hitting a major pulmonary vessel is high causing both bilateral tension pneumothoraces and massive intrathoracic hemorrhage.
 

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