AZ bans trail cameras

LVJ76

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On the entire Mogollon Rim to Flagstaff, the camping and recreation pressure on wildlife is insane. "Covid camping" (those that could no longer stand to quarantine at home) just added more pressure than I've ever seen.

Last summer my wife, son and I did some summer elk scouting on our yearly week at the lake in the Mogollon Rim, and we had never, and I mean never seen as many campers and chaos, it was simply bad.
 

7070yshot

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On the entire Mogollon Rim to Flagstaff, the camping and recreation pressure on wildlife is insane. "Covid camping" (those that could no longer stand to quarantine at home) just added more pressure than I've ever seen.
What do you mean? How are you “observing pressure”. Meaning I know what a pressured species looks and acts like what are your observations?
 

LVJ76

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What do you mean? How are you “observing pressure”. Meaning I know what a pressured species looks and acts like what are your observations?

Meaning we dont see wildlife where we did anymore. Last year we had to go several miles deeper in the woods to see wildlife that was once easier to see.

There's way more noise and people than there used to be.
 
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WmBob

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The commission did indeed vote for a total ban on all trail cameras yesterday 06-11-2021. This is in addition to the previous ban on live cameras. All read prepared statements as to why they voted for the ban.
 

Mike Matteson

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People were just taking pictures using the forest, were complaining about the trail cams. Claiming it is causing problems at the water holes. People do create problems by going to water holes, but only during there time there. The hunter pays fees to the state to hunt. The people that just walk and take pictures, don't pay a thing, and they are wanting pictures of animals. If you thing that just walking up to a water hole you are going to see wild animals standing there, think again. The trail cam doesn't spook the animals. People walking around do. Trail cam cuts that down. A user fee for people that uses the forest for free should be put in place, that don't hunt. We the hunter by liceneses fees pays for animal care in each state we hunt in. As a hunter bow hunter over several water holes, watch animals after animals come in and drink and left without any problem over the years. Guess what the trail cams were there too. That was within 40yds. So the trail cam troubling the wild game doesn't hold up. It was the non-hunters that cause this problem complaining about the trail cams. (The stupid or the unknowing) If people thing they can just walk up to a water hole and see wild game, is blowing smoke out their ***. I wrote Az. about this and suggest that a user fee be charge to people that don't get a hunting lic. Az should charge $150.00 for out of state users, and $15.00 for instate people. The fees go to the Fish & Game department. It's the tree huger that created the problem and cause the restriction to be put into place. In Montana trail cams have to be taken down at season start. You don't think the the Mt. Loins don't stay by water holes, think again. That's the most dangers place for wild animals. They are on high alert.
Good luck trying to keep track on were and when the game cams are in place. There isn't enough game warden to even begin to check the areas. Stupid is, Stupid does.
 

jgs8163

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Glad they will be limiting the use of them. It was voted on yesterday and the minutes have not been released but the proposal is listed here and will be approved and take effect Jan1 2022. No trail cameras on water holes at all.

JGS8163

****
In response to internal and external discussions and comments related to the December proposal, the commission, at its February 2021 meeting, voted 5-0 to open a separate rulemaking with proposed language that, if approved, would:

Prohibit the use of trail cameras for the purpose of taking or aiding in the take of wildlife within ¼ mile of a developed water source.

Allow the use of trail cameras to aid in the take of wildlife from February 1 through June 30 as long as the camera is not placed within ¼ mile of a developed water source.

This new proposed language presented in February does not replace the December proposed rule, but provides the commission with options to consider at the conclusion of both rulemaking processes.

View UPDATED INFORMATION about the two rule proposals (this document also includes an overview of comments received related to the December proposed rule – see second bullet down). A link to the document is also posted at https://www.azgfd.com/Agency/Commission/commissioncorner/.

Public comments related to the February rulemaking proposal are being accepted by email at [email protected] from March 11 through April 11, 2021.

The final rulemaking for the December proposal will not be heard at the March 19 commission meeting as previously anticipated. The final rulemaking for both proposals will be heard at the June 11 commission meeting in Payson. At that meeting, the commission can approve either of the two final rules or terminate rulemaking altogether. Any change to the current trail camera rule will not go into effect prior to Jan. 1, 2022.*****
 

LVJ76

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Glad they will be limiting the use of them. It was voted on yesterday and the minutes have not been released but the proposal is listed here and will be approved and take effect Jan1 2022. No trail cameras on water holes at all.

JGS8163

****
In response to internal and external discussions and comments related to the December proposal, the commission, at its February 2021 meeting, voted 5-0 to open a separate rulemaking with proposed language that, if approved, would:

Prohibit the use of trail cameras for the purpose of taking or aiding in the take of wildlife within ¼ mile of a developed water source.

Allow the use of trail cameras to aid in the take of wildlife from February 1 through June 30 as long as the camera is not placed within ¼ mile of a developed water source.

This new proposed language presented in February does not replace the December proposed rule, but provides the commission with options to consider at the conclusion of both rulemaking processes.

View UPDATED INFORMATION about the two rule proposals (this document also includes an overview of comments received related to the December proposed rule – see second bullet down). A link to the document is also posted at https://www.azgfd.com/Agency/Commission/commissioncorner/.

Public comments related to the February rulemaking proposal are being accepted by email at [email protected] from March 11 through April 11, 2021.

The final rulemaking for the December proposal will not be heard at the March 19 commission meeting as previously anticipated. The final rulemaking for both proposals will be heard at the June 11 commission meeting in Payson. At that meeting, the commission can approve either of the two final rules or terminate rulemaking altogether. Any change to the current trail camera rule will not go into effect prior to Jan. 1, 2022.*****

Thanks for the info.
 

Raudy707

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Ok but what problem does this solve really? People use cameras to establish pattern of life and see what’s coming around.
It all comes down to ethics and fair chase. The western states can be quite arid. Some zones may have a half a dozen water holes for the animals. When you see 18 to 20 camera's on each water hole, guaranteed this is a disturbance to the animals and livestock. Ranchers have claimed livestock won't drink sometimes as they are scared of all the camera's. I use 3 game camera's on my ranch roads and enjoy seeing what animals are cruising around and as a security measure for trespassers.
 

John Klingenberg

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Last summer my wife, son and I did some summer elk scouting on our yearly week at the lake in the Mogollon Rim, and we had never, and I mean never seen as many campers and chaos, it was simply bad.
It's been weird in our state too. I saw people "camping" in tents while there was still snow on the ground. Places that were usually pretty quiet (trails, back road, off-road areas) all have a few boarders now. And oh boy a lot of them look shady.
 

LVJ76

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It's been weird in our state too. I saw people "camping" in tents while there was still snow on the ground. Places that were usually pretty quiet (trails, back road, off-road areas) all have a few boarders now. And oh boy a lot of them look shady.

My wife and I were looking for a solo tent for her for her Grand Canyon trip and there were hardly any camping supplies compared to pre Covid times. Since last year when I book our reservations for campgrounds there are hardly any available here in AZ.

Even the dry camping areas are saturated with people and these areas are getting destroyed.

And yes, many look very shady.
 

Bob Wright

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What do you mean? How are you “observing pressure”. Meaning I know what a pressured species looks and acts like what are your observations?
Elk for instance going completely nocturnal during or before hunting season in 6A. My observations included night surveys with handheld spotlights. Where there were many easily picked up after dark, there were simply none during the day. 6A is heavily hunted, and extensively used for recreation 6 or more months out of the year. The animals adjust, and survive as best they can.
Placing cams on waterholes, leaving human scent in a large radius, will put notice out that this place is not a good place for elk herds to be. They may come in, but many of our buddies cams pick up mostly nighttime photos, and skittish animals. They grab a drink, plow thru the water and off they go. That kind of pressure, depending on how accessible that particular waterhole is to humans. Seeps and springs in canyons is where you'll find most bedding grounds, not on tanks. They are smart.
 
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