Are micrometer seater dies worth it?

Tgunz64

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Is it worth the money to invest in the micrometer dies if most of the loads your planning to make are mainly for hunting? Or is this more for a competition thing? Just wondering if I should pick up a couple for a couple calibers I have.
 

Greyfox

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The micrometer seating dyes are worth the added cost and convenient if you are doing a lot of development load work, or shoot different loads with the same cartridge. Otherwise a standard seater dye will work out fine for a fixed hunting load. IMO
 
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lancetkenyon

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Most of my sets are micrometer seaters. Nice to know you are dialing .001-.002" rather than eyeballing it. I like all my rounds seated exactly the same CBTO to within .0005".
If you load for more than one rifle in a certain cartridge, well worth it.
 
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Tgunz64

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Ok. I would really like to make some good loads for a 26 Nosler. Haven’t loaded anything up yet but will be here shortly. And with how picky some bullets tend to be with seating distance (or so I’ve heard) it’d be nice to have good consistency.
 

EricRF

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Agreed, they are invaluable for load development. Especially when using bullets that are known to be picky about the seating depth. For example, the Barnes say to start .05 off the lands, but you will get varying results by adjusting that.
 

Tgunz64

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Agreed, they are invaluable for load development. Especially when using bullets that are known to be picky about the seating depth. For example, the Barnes say to start .05 off the lands, but you will get varying results by adjusting that.
I have some Barnes LRX 127gr and recently bought Berger VLD Hunting bullets. Berger says the best accuracy is touching the rifling but for hunting to back off at .020 for a good starting point. Also so you don’t risk jamming into the rifling and pulling the bullet apart when ejecting. Redding makes a specific micrometer for the VLD and 26 Nosler. It’s designed to be shaped for the sharper point of a VLD.
 

Frank Kalisz

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I do very well with my non-micrometer Forster Benchrest Seater Die. All I need to do to is keep a “dummy” proof cartridge for every bullet I use. I just put the proof cartridge in my press to adjust my seater, and all my new cartridges will get exact match to seating depth of the proof cartridge. It’s very easy to do.
 

Tgunz64

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I do very well with my non-micrometer Forster Benchrest Seater Die. All I need to do to is keep a “dummy” proof cartridge for every bullet I use. I just put the proof cartridge in my press to adjust my seater, and all my new cartridges will get exact match to seating depth of the proof cartridge. It’s very easy to do.
I was thinking of doing the same thing for now to save some money for the time being. I’ve just spent about 600 on a magneto speed v3 and other reloading stuff. So to fork out another $90 for a micrometer right now I’m hesitant. But if they are worth it I’ll get one or 2 in the near future.
 

Susquatch

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I'll make this simple and sweet. EVERYONE who reloads can benefit from micrometer seaters!

The more detailed advantages go somewhat like this:

1. Changing seating depth is as simple as turning a head the number of thou required.

2. Every bullet type/weight is different. Record the settings and change bullets as often as required. Only needs to be setup once for each bullet as opposed to every time you change anything.

3. No more guessing about how much to turn the stem.

Also, keep in mind that you don't have to buy a competition seater to get micrometer adjustment. For example, you can get a micrometer adjustment spindle for a conventional Redding Seating Die, or you can buy the premium die which comes with the micrometer.

The sliding sleeve design is beautiful but not essential. In my view, the micrometer is essential. All my dies are either the sliding sleeve or the conventional with the micrometer head.

Changing seating depth is easy peasy.
 

dhois

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OP. I have micro-seaters but for the hunting rounds I use the most, I don’t. My rifle is a Browning Abolt ii in 338 WM that is magazine fed. Jump to the lands is 0.168”. It is (sometimes) sub-MOA at 200 yds. If you can afford it, get the micrometer seater die but it might not be essential unless your hunting rifle is very sensitive to the seating depth of the bullets you work with.
 
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