Archery/Bow exercises ...

FEENIX

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I had a right shoulder/rotary cuff surgery a few years ago. It went very well but have to drop down the draw weight to 55 lbs.

This year I was diagnosed with a tennis elbow on my left hand. My physical therapy went well and the pain went away during the session. However, now that I'm back to practicing again, the pain is back.

The pain is tolerable but after a few draws, I get so much weaker and way too shaky. The draw weight is currently set at 50 lbs. Before I forget, I also early signs of carpal tunnel on my right arm (but no pain at this time, just occasional tingling sensation) ... yeah, I know I'm falling apart but I refuse to give up at this time. :D:rolleyes::cool::)

Anyways, I was wondering if any member has a similar situation and is willing to share exercises that works for them. I do weight training exercise but nothing crazy; more of toning than strengthening or muscle build up.

In short, I'm all ears ... thank you in advance for your support and understanding.

Ed
 

FEENIX

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I supposed it would help in part what I have in hand already ...

At work, I have elastic bands, stress ball, and grip exerciser that I do along with exercises for my carpal tunnel that my physical therapist prescribed.

At the gym, for weights 3X a week; lats pull down/up, arm curls, abs , incline press, leg press/curl, etc + 20-30 minutes on the thread mill at 15-20% grade at 2.5-3 MPH for cardio.

I home I have an older Total gym and what's on the pix. I can do limited push ups but not the perfect push up at this time; the torquing/twisting motion hurts too much.

It's strange and I don't quite understand it but the PT exercises provided for my tennis elbow is more of rib cage and pelvic adjustment/realignment.

Thanks!
 

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FearNoWind

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Our experiences are not precisely the same so what worked for me may not work for you and you'd be well advised to check with your physical therapist before you choose the exercises that are appropriate for your circumstances.
Because drawing a bow is essentially a pushing rather than a pulling motion, I wanted to strengthen the shoulder and elbow on the arm that supports the bow. I had a shoulder injury that didn't require surgery, along with an elbow injury that did require surgery. Push ups with those rotating "handles" helped me strengthen both my shoulders and elbows and took the strain off of my wrists because I didn't have to bend them to rest my hands on the floor. Squeezing my fist while holding finger pressure on the trochlear notch of my elbow revealed to me that the small muscles in the back of the elbow flexed with that motion. So I began the isometric and squeezing exercises to work on that. My carpal tunnel required surgery (both hands) and recovery time eliminated any opportunity for exercising elbows and shoulders so I lost a bit of what I had previously gained and it took a while to get back to where I was.
 
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FEENIX

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Our experiences are not precisely the same so what worked for me may not work for you and you'd be well advised to check with your physical therapist before you choose the exercises that are appropriate for your circumstances.
Because drawing a bow is essentially a pushing rather than a pulling motion, I wanted to strengthen the shoulder and elbow on the arm that supports the bow. I had a shoulder injury that didn't require surgery, along with an elbow injury that did require surgery. Push ups with those rotating "handles" helped me strengthen both my shoulders and elbows and took the strain off of my wrists because I didn't have to bend them to rest my hands on the floor. Squeezing my fist while holding finger pressure on the trochlear notch of my elbow revealed to me that the small muscles in the back of the elbow flexed with that motion. So I began the isometric and squeezing exercises to work on that. My carpal tunnel required surgery (both hands) and recovery time eliminated any opportunity for exercising elbows and shoulders so I lost a bit of what I had previously gained and it took a while to get back to where I was.
I fully understand. My physical therapist knew I am a bowhunter so one of the assistant therapist who is also a bowhunter helped in the therapy session.

When I draw my bow, I actually push and pull at the same time and I do those exercises with the bow exerciser for both my left and right arms 2-3 times a day.

At this time, I was cleared of my physical therapy referral just and started the squeezing exercise last week and want explore other exercises; basically cleared to do exercises for as long as it does not further aggravate my current conditions. I was also provided a TENS unit for the pain management.

Sorry to hear about your carpal tunnel operations on both hands. My sister had the her both hands operated too ... just hoping mine don't get worse.

Thanks for taking the time and sharing your personal experience ... I will definitely check out those isometric exercises.

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jrock

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I use to get a very sharp pain in my shoulder when drawing the bow. Found out recently at the chiropractor that it was a nerve caused by my C5 vertebra being out. Last year I worked out relentless thinking it was some strength weakness but it didn't help a bit. Chiropractor set me straight, no pun intended. Just thought I would share my finding.
 

FEENIX

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I use to get a very sharp pain in my shoulder when drawing the bow. Found out recently at the chiropractor that it was a nerve caused by my C5 vertebra being out. Last year I worked out relentless thinking it was some strength weakness but it didn't help a bit. Chiropractor set me straight, no pun intended. Just thought I would share my finding.
Thanks for sharing!

I've always wanted to try chiropractor in the past but the Air Force/Tricare was not very supportive; chiropractor treatment not quite accepted ... might have to re-engage if the policy has changed.
 

stonehands1

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Growing up on a dairy farm I was shoveling poop, carrying 5 gallon buckets of milk and bucking 100lb hay bales as long as I can remember. Of course this made me a strong young buck and served me well. At age 20 I began my career in heavy civil construction. By the time I was 30 carpal tunnel and back pain was getting to be part of my daily life. I was in great physical shape and cycled 200 to 400 miles a week for cardio. When my hamstrings got so tight that I was getting tendon pain in my knees I asked a friend about massage. She referred me to a therapist she went to school with and after seeing him twice a week for a month I felt 10 years younger.
I went for all the testing and could have had carpal tunnel surgery on both hands. I asked my therapist if he could do anything for my hands. He said no problem. After treatment for about a month symptoms went away and have had no problems since (12 years now). He said most pain is caused by scar tissue built up over the years and massage will break up the damaged tissue and allow the muscle to heal and strengthen. Of course not all massage therapists are equal so finding one that is more of a therapeutic therapist is important.
I know it's not the manliest thing to get a massage but I have found it to be very helpful in keeping fit and balanced and has allowed me to maintain the lifestyle I want to live. Massage, Physical therapy, and chiropractic care should keep you hunting for years to come.
Best of luck.
 

jrock

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I know it's not the manliest thing to get a massage but I have found it to be very helpful in keeping fit and balanced and has allowed me to maintain the lifestyle I want to live. Massage, Physical therapy, and chiropractic care should keep you hunting for years to come.
Best of luck.
Good point. I was told to get that done in conjunction with my chiropractic work. In fact I'm scheduled for one tomorrow! It does help
 

rcowan

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Apr 1, 2014
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SE AZ
Hey Ed

I had surgery on both shoulders. The left one is 100% but the right one is not working as well. I use a thing called a Bow Trainer. Metal stick about the length of my compound and rubbery strings. You pull the combination of strands to get the weight you need.
It works for me. I've increased my strength in the right arm and increased the DW on the bow. A few of us get together on Monday nights and they have noticed an increase in my number and accuracy of my shots.

YMMV
RC


I had a right shoulder/rotary cuff surgery a few years ago. It went very well but have to drop down the draw weight to 55 lbs.

This year I was diagnosed with a tennis elbow on my left hand. My physical therapy went well and the pain went away during the session. However, now that I'm back to practicing again, the pain is back.

The pain is tolerable but after a few draws, I get so much weaker and way too shaky. The draw weight is currently set at 50 lbs. Before I forget, I also early signs of carpal tunnel on my right arm (but no pain at this time, just occasional tingling sensation) ... yeah, I know I'm falling apart but I refuse to give up at this time. :D:rolleyes::cool::)

Anyways, I was wondering if any member has a similar situation and is willing to share exercises that works for them. I do weight training exercise but nothing crazy; more of toning than strengthening or muscle build up.

In short, I'm all ears ... thank you in advance for your support and understanding.

Ed
 

FEENIX

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Dec 20, 2008
Messages
13,807
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Great Falls, MT
Hey Ed

I had surgery on both shoulders. The left one is 100% but the right one is not working as well. I use a thing called a Bow Trainer. Metal stick about the length of my compound and rubbery strings. You pull the combination of strands to get the weight you need.
It works for me. I've increased my strength in the right arm and increased the DW on the bow. A few of us get together on Monday nights and they have noticed an increase in my number and accuracy of my shots.

YMMV
RC
RC,

Dang both shoulders!

I too use the bow trainer, see post #3. I'm glad it's working for you. Too early for me if it's working but it's a slow process. Thanks!

Ed
 

rcowan

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SE AZ
RC,

Dang both shoulders!

I too use the bow trainer, see post #3. I'm glad it's working for you. Too early for me if it's working but it's a slow process. Thanks!

Ed
Yep real slow. I'm into my 2nd year after surgery.
I guess I use the right arm more and notice the weakness and discomfort. Not particular pain unless I over stress it. I'm good for about 15 pulls in an hour but thats all I can manage.

I'm back up to about 66 pounds.
 

FEENIX

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Great Falls, MT
Yep real slow. I'm into my 2nd year after surgery.
I guess I use the right arm more and notice the weakness and discomfort. Not particular pain unless I over stress it. I'm good for about 15 pulls in an hour but thats all I can manage.

I'm back up to about 66 pounds.
Good for you. My right shoulder that had rotary cuff surgery on is OK, it's my left tennis elbow that is bothering me at the moment.

I have my bow set all the way down to 50 lbs at the moment but still booking at 286 FPS with 318g and getting very good penetration up to 40 yards.

I try shoot groups of 3s but 3rd one always messes me up ... get too tired and shaky. :D







Not very good but it's work in progress. :D
 

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