Antelope recipes

Discussion in 'Cooks' Corner' started by JMack, Nov 7, 2018.

  1. JMack

    JMack Well-Known Member

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    anyone care to share their fav antelope recipes? Have ground meat, roasts, and backstrap medallions available.

    Thanks!

    JMack
     
  2. elf

    elf Active Member

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    I only shot one goat in my life; had all of it ground up into hamburg. It was terrible, all I could taste was sage.
     
  3. 1Moose

    1Moose Well-Known Member

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    JMack, my family has enjoyed “pulled pronghorn” recipes. I’ve used a couple of different pulled pork recipes from the web before and everyone who tried them really liked it. My wife, who doesn’t like pronghorn as much as she does elk, was a big fan as well. If I find a specific recipe I’ll share it, through it has varied each time I’ve cooked it. These are slow cooker recipes. If there’s any concern regarding gaminess in the meat, shoot for recipes that have a bit more spice or BBQ to them.
     
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  4. JMack

    JMack Well-Known Member

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    Thanks that sounds like a good idea. I’ve done that will elk and it turns out excellent.
     
  5. cjuve

    cjuve Well-Known Member

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    Call me old fashioned but for me Antelope is best cooked to med rare with butter and a little salt and pepper, anything that I can’t make into a steak get turned into pepperoni.
     
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  6. Elkeater

    Elkeater Well-Known Member

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    I made brats this year that are excellent. Burgers with a little Montreal steak seasoning in them are great, chili is awesome, tacos excellent. Steaks just marinade in olive oil, salt, pepper, fresh garlic, grated onion and a little lime juice, then grill to medium rare and enjoy. I love antelope meat. Never had one that I didn’t like. Trick with any wild game is being crazy picky about meat care. Get the hide off of them don’t touch the hide then the meat, and get them cooled down Immediately.
     
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  7. Orange Dust

    Orange Dust Well-Known Member

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    Learned this from a Sushi Chef. Before cooking wrap each steak in a paper towel. Then wrap the steak with Saran Wrap to seal from moisture. Let sit 24hrs in the frige. Body fluids will leach out into paper towel and the meat will both tenderize and be much less gamey. Works on all meat, even bear and snow goose. Antelope is Very Strong. Try this, it will calm it down some.
     
  8. MachV

    MachV Well-Known Member

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    The better half demands that all goat be ground with 1/4 (or more) bacon ends and she cooks it up just like hamburger.
    Was she ever pissed the other day when she took out venison steaks and smelled goat when she started cooking it, that will learn her to help butcher ;-) To me antelope tastes good but it smell god awful when ie first starts cooking.
    The leftover from the previous year gets turned into sticks.
    Another thing I stumbled into with antelope hams is to smoke the heck out of it and slice it up for lunch meat
     
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  9. manitou

    manitou Well-Known Member

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    Wow... I have only killed 9 pronghorns, but they have been absolutely phenominal table fare.
    Our favorite meat!
    Steaks, we cut into 1 1/2" cubes and skewer with onion, jalopeno, cherry tomatoes and various peppers... red, yellow and orange. Cooked to a medium rare or medium. Awesome! The guys at work like them so much they offer to pay for my tags!
    We grind ALL our wild game meat with about 30% fatty roasts... pork and beef. Wife buys the roasts before season whenever she sees a deal and tosses them in the freezer until "grinding day". We do this to add moisture to the grind.
    Of course, wild game roasts go in a crock pot with new potatoes, onion, celery and carrots. Add chicken or beef broth for juice if you want. A little red pepper, black pepper and salt.
    The steak meat is only soaked in olive oil for an hour or so, then seasoned lightly before cooking. We find that antelope will absorb flavors more readily than a lot of other meats and can be over the top if over-seasoned.
    Maybe I have been lucky or maybe it's the fact that I get the hide yanked off them ASAP and get them cooled quickly. Most, if not all the goats I have taken are in sagebrush country, but frequent irrigated hay fields and prairie shortgrasses.
    Also: Google Kefta Kabobs for a ground pronghorn/venison recipe. With home made tsaziki sauce they are a nice change to use up ground meat.
    Another great recipe to google is osso bucco. You will never look at shanks the same way... and will probably regret all the years of tossing them away.
     
    Last edited: Nov 7, 2018
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  10. toecutter

    toecutter Well-Known Member

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    100% agree with this! Antelope is phenomenal if you dress it correctly and are able to cook. Ive seen people destroy every kind of meat, wild or not -just from lack of ability in the kitchen. Take your time and follow the advice of those more versed in the ways of the kitchen until you develop your chops. That being said, spicy brown mustard, chopped fresh garlic (never jar), low sodium soy and either cider vinegar or balsamic are an excellent crowd pleaser as a marinade.
    Good luck and keep us posted on your results.
     
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  11. Elkeater

    Elkeater Well-Known Member

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    Antelope shanks browned in a little olive oil in a Dutch oven some salt and pepper then braised in some beef broth red wine and garlic and onion for a few hours. You will never look at shanks the same and you’ll never grind them again.
     
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  12. Tyler Kee

    Tyler Kee Active Member

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    Do you have an immersion circulator? Like an Anova? If not, consider it. Lotta lives have been changed by cooking game truly low and slow in some duck fat and herbs. For most of the tender bits, go 125 degrees for 60-90 minutes and then toss it under the broiler or in a hot pan with more duck fat or butter until you hit the exterior color you're looking for.

    And yeah, braised shanks are the truth.
     
  13. JMack

    JMack Well-Known Member

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    I do not have an immersion circulator but I’ll look into it. Thanks
     
  14. JMack

    JMack Well-Known Member

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    Generally, thanks to all for your replies. Looking forward to trying some of this. I’ve spent 30 years processing and cooking my whitetail here in pa So I’m really anxious to try this out