Annealing Services vs Buying an Annealer

SteelBanger

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Joined
Dec 4, 2019
Messages
403
Location
IL
Does anyone here use an annealing service and if so who do you use and how much does it run per case? I’m trying to do a cost benefit analysis of using a service vs buying something like the Annealeez and doing it myself. I like the idea of shipping a batch of brass off and having it done for me but by the time you pay all the shipping I’m guessing the Annealeez might pay for itself fairly quickly … obviously dependent on shooting volume.


Thanks!
 

jasonco

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Feb 11, 2009
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1,386
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Colorado
For little more than $100, some simple tools (or high end tools) and a little time and imagination, a nice propane annealer can be fabricated.

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SteelBanger

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Dec 4, 2019
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403
Location
IL
Thanks guys, I watched a couple videos on the salt bath method and I like the looks of that over the torch method. Couple process questions as I try to figure out in my head how / where to fit this into my reloading process. Right now I use a universal decapping die to de-prime my cases, then wet tumble, resize, trim / chamfer and de-burr, prime, load. Since you have to dunk the cases in a cooling bath after a dip in the salt would it make sense to de-prime, then salt bath and drop them straight into the wet tumbler to cool and then I can go straight to tumbling? I just hate the idea of wet tumbling and drying them, only to have to dunk and dry them again. Not that it's the end of the world, just time consuming. Or is it best to salt bath clean cases to eliminate all the case residue and dirt gunking up the salt bath? I guess I could always dry tumble the case for an initial cleaning, then salt bath and wet tumble?
 

jasonco

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Joined
Feb 11, 2009
Messages
1,386
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Colorado
Molten Salt-probably? Higher danger level-definitely! A simple drop of sweat, in the vat, and there's an explosive problem.
It only takes a few minutes to set the speed & propane flame on my annealer.
The salt bath is an involved process and as a handloader, make any process as efficient as possible!
My next project is, a DIY induction annealer....


 

Saskquatch6

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Joined
Dec 2, 2012
Messages
47
Location
Saskatchewan
Thanks guys, I watched a couple videos on the salt bath method and I like the looks of that over the torch method. Couple process questions as I try to figure out in my head how / where to fit this into my reloading process. Right now I use a universal decapping die to de-prime my cases, then wet tumble, resize, trim / chamfer and de-burr, prime, load. Since you have to dunk the cases in a cooling bath after a dip in the salt would it make sense to de-prime, then salt bath and drop them straight into the wet tumbler to cool and then I can go straight to tumbling? I just hate the idea of wet tumbling and drying them, only to have to dunk and dry them again. Not that it's the end of the world, just time consuming. Or is it best to salt bath clean cases to eliminate all the case residue and dirt gunking up the salt bath? I guess I could always dry tumble the case for an initial cleaning, then salt bath and wet tumble?
I just started salt bath annealing a couple of months ago and find it to be quick, easy, effective, relatively inexpensive, and no more dangerous than many of the other activities involved in reloading process. Would certainly recommend SBA - but if you'll be annealing enough to justify it, one of the higher cost systems may be worth it to you. In terms of process, I deprime, brush necks (to remove loose debris which could contaminate salt, then SB anneal (before sizing etc) as annealing improves the consistency of shoulder bump and neck tension. I'd probably just dunk hot cases into a separate bucket first to rinse any residual salt then transfer to wet tumbler to prevent salt contamination in tumbler. Then continue with rest of your usual case prep process.
 

SteelBanger

Well-Known Member
Joined
Dec 4, 2019
Messages
403
Location
IL
Molten Salt-probably? Higher danger level-definitely! A simple drop of sweat, in the vat, and there's an explosive problem.
It only takes a few minutes to set the speed & propane flame on my annealer.
The salt bath is an involved process and as a handloader, make any process as efficient as possible!
My next project is, a DIY induction annealer....


Ok you might have sold me on this, a lot safer, cleaner, simple, and cost effective. Time to start researching induction annealing!
 

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