Annealing Issue

ButterBean

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I started annealing several years ago now, using a drill, socket, and torch. It appeared to work and give better results than not annealing- or so I thought. Then the shooting sport became more and more popular, technology advanced, and we started getting better tools to actually see results more than just on target. Chronographs got much better and more precise. We even have reloading presses with load cells that can accurately measure pressure/force required to seat a bullet. So now we know annealing does make difference for sure, but it really needs to be done properly to actually produce consistent and proper results. It needs to be controlled and very consistent. A torch and a drill leaves far too many inconsistencies and the results are typically not proper and almost never consistent. You’d be better off not annealing and just buying fresh brass. I only anneal by induction now.

Sure, some guys are getting by still just fine for their needs with a torch and drill, other flame annealing methods, and even salt bath annealing, but I’d go out on a limb and say most of them aren’t shooting for top precision and don’t really care about getting top consistency from it. Nothing wrong with that since we all have different needs and goals. I would say though that improving your annealing method would likely help you in your situation. Or just buying new brass when it starts splitting.

I’ll assume it’s not your die setup since it sized the brass fine the previous firings up until this one. It sounds like you got the brass too soft, but hard to say for certain.
That's your opinion and no offense intended but you are incorrect
 
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ButterBean

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Been annealing for about 10yrs now. Had a new issue today that I've not experienced before.

3x fired WW 7mm Mag brass. Had a neck start to split. Annealed them with a flame, approx 7 sec.

Resized with a FL die after annealing.

Just seated a bullet to my COAL and when I checked it with my calipers I pushed the bullet all the way in the case.

I've got ways to get around it I'm just wondering if anyone else has experienced this.
How many firings on the cases ?
 

eshorebwhntr

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The posted video showing over annealing is what I was referencing. Thanks for adding the link.

I will check the expander ball but I don't think that's the culprit.

The entire lot that was annealed are not gripping the bullet adequately after being annealed.
 

Philward

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Measure neck wall thickness. If not under 12thou then expander ball as suggested or the brass changed and it's not very elastic, no spring back as you suspect.
 

Reelamin

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IMO, an excellent example of color in your video, Bean.
I think in Cortina's video, the annealing he does at 10, 15 and 20 seconds are all too hot, and seem well in excess of 1200°F.
That was exactly his intent. If you noticed the end result of his intentional OVER annealing then I accomplished my posts intent.
 

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