AMP Press

Painless300

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Joined
Sep 17, 2020
Messages
255
Location
Rome, GA
Thanks for the follow up video, very good info. I am very interested in getting one of these just to aid in refining my brass prep and identifying issues in my process. Please keep the updates coming as you learn more about what the graphs are telling you.
 

MagnumManiac

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Joined
Feb 25, 2008
Messages
3,961
Seating force should equate to bullet release. Consistent bullet release is the key. I’d never be able to afford such a press.
Unfortunately, this not true.
Once the bullet is used to force it’s way into the neck expanding it, the same force is not needed to pull that bullet back out.
The military came up with an arbitrary number of 30lbs to pull a bullet as minimum.
Bullets are not ‘pulled’ from a case upon firing, they are pushed out, but the point at which the neck loses all grip upon the bullet surface in the burn is hotly debated.
I can propel a bullet from a 264WM case fired in a 338WM chamber with only a magnum primer at sufficient speed to pass through several sheets of paper and, when measuring said case, the neck has clearly expanded just from the primer pressure alone…..I know bullets are ‘released’ by the neck as it expands, not pushed out with neck resistance as many believe.
It takes very little pressure to expand a thin neck upon firing.
Anyway, take it as you will. Seating force is only a testimonial on how hard or soft your brass is, not how much IF tension there is.

Cheers.
 

nwmnbowhunter

Well-Known Member
Joined
Nov 13, 2017
Messages
313
From what I've gathered so far.

Problems it will identify....

1. Varying case length
2. Varying chamfer problems
3. Inconsistent neck lube type issues
4. Inconsistent neck tension
5. Donut area problems

Please add or correct to the list of PROBLEMS it can identify
 

orkan

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Joined
Jun 11, 2010
Messages
914
Location
SD
From what I've gathered so far.

Problems it will identify....

1. Varying case length
2. Varying chamfer problems
3. Inconsistent neck lube type issues
4. Inconsistent neck tension
5. Donut area problems

Please add or correct to the list of PROBLEMS it can identify
Bullet ogive inconsistency will mix in with chamfer and case length. Length is length to that axis, and any inconsistency will show on the graph. The press can basically identify "any" problem that pertains to bullet seating. Oversize or undersize bullets. Inconsistent brass thickness. Really, it can all show up on the graph.


(directed at no one in particular)
As has been mentioned, this is the same as what we've all done for years with inline dies. The difference is that now we don't have to worry about how we run the arbor press. That work is done for us, in as consistent of a manner as is possible. The graph will read out any variation, which will allow us to see it more precisely than we could ever feel it.

The analytical power is unprecedented. So if you want to know which method of chamfering is most consistent, now you can see it. You can experiment with everything, and directly see the results on the graph. Some things you see on the graph, you will absolutely be able to shoot the difference. Others, you will never notice, even at 1000yds. It will take quite some time for the community to understand those correlations.

I absolutely refuse to engage in that debate. Not here, or any other social venue. No matter what evidence I would produce, a hoard of zombies will be there to refute it. The more evidence I would provide, the harder they'd fight against it... so it is literally pointless. Why is it pointless? It's pointless because almost EVERYONE that would be arguing against it will never have touched the thing in their lives, and have no experience by which to even have a debate... yet there they will be regardless. I'll debate that stuff on the Gunhive forums only... where the inexperienced are immediately silenced when they are being disruptive. I know some of you are legitimate in your search for knowledge, but the number of non-invested trolls is simply too high for me to entertain that discussion. Especially considering 3/4 of the people that will call it a "waste of money" today, will be seen talking about how awesome it is when they eventually buy it later. The other 1/4 can't afford it. I've seen this all before, and too many times in the last 20 years. It all happened the same way with the AMP annealer, and I can already see the threads and posts scattered across the internet trying to trod this press down.

It's an ugly thing, and I'm distancing myself from the ugly people that perpetuate it. If you want to hear what I have to say, then you can subscribe to our youtube channel, follow us on Instagram, or register on Gunhive. I won't be drawn into a debate on the merits of this press anywhere else. This is not to say I won't provide links to that content here, but I will not engage the peanut gallery at all any longer. If people want to be combative, I'll just report them immediately and not give it a single thought or hesitation. There's a way to be polite in a disagreement, and it seems many people here have forgot themselves these days.

The obvious strengths of this press are just that, obvious. The automated nature has produced the most relaxing bullet seating op I've ever experienced. It exudes confidence. If it were powered, and didn't even have a graph, I'd still buy it for that reason alone. The rest is just added layers of utility and fun. All this is to say that I'll recommend the press to anyone that can afford it. Inline dies are great, and the automated operation of them is just outstanding.

I'll have another cool video about the press to post later today or tomorrow.
 

nwmnbowhunter

Well-Known Member
Joined
Nov 13, 2017
Messages
313
Bullet ogive inconsistency will mix in with chamfer and case length. Length is length to that axis, and any inconsistency will show on the graph. The press can basically identify "any" problem that pertains to bullet seating. Oversize or undersize bullets. Inconsistent brass thickness. Really, it can all show up on the graph.


(directed at no one in particular)
As has been mentioned, this is the same as what we've all done for years with inline dies. The difference is that now we don't have to worry about how we run the arbor press. That work is done for us, in as consistent of a manner as is possible. The graph will read out any variation, which will allow us to see it more precisely than we could ever feel it.

The analytical power is unprecedented. So if you want to know which method of chamfering is most consistent, now you can see it. You can experiment with everything, and directly see the results on the graph. Some things you see on the graph, you will absolutely be able to shoot the difference. Others, you will never notice, even at 1000yds. It will take quite some time for the community to understand those correlations.

I absolutely refuse to engage in that debate. Not here, or any other social venue. No matter what evidence I would produce, a hoard of zombies will be there to refute it. The more evidence I would provide, the harder they'd fight against it... so it is literally pointless. Why is it pointless? It's pointless because almost EVERYONE that would be arguing against it will never have touched the thing in their lives, and have no experience by which to even have a debate... yet there they will be regardless. I'll debate that stuff on the Gunhive forums only... where the inexperienced are immediately silenced when they are being disruptive. I know some of you are legitimate in your search for knowledge, but the number of non-invested trolls is simply too high for me to entertain that discussion. Especially considering 3/4 of the people that will call it a "waste of money" today, will be seen talking about how awesome it is when they eventually buy it later. The other 1/4 can't afford it. I've seen this all before, and too many times in the last 20 years. It all happened the same way with the AMP annealer, and I can already see the threads and posts scattered across the internet trying to trod this press down.

It's an ugly thing, and I'm distancing myself from the ugly people that perpetuate it. If you want to hear what I have to say, then you can subscribe to our youtube channel, follow us on Instagram, or register on Gunhive. I won't be drawn into a debate on the merits of this press anywhere else. This is not to say I won't provide links to that content here, but I will not engage the peanut gallery at all any longer. If people want to be combative, I'll just report them immediately and not give it a single thought or hesitation. There's a way to be polite in a disagreement, and it seems many people here have forgot themselves these days.

The obvious strengths of this press are just that, obvious. The automated nature has produced the most relaxing bullet seating op I've ever experienced. It exudes confidence. If it were powered, and didn't even have a graph, I'd still buy it for that reason alone. The rest is just added layers of utility and fun. All this is to say that I'll recommend the press to anyone that can afford it. Inline dies are great, and the automated operation of them is just outstanding.

I'll have another cool video about the press to post later today or tomorrow.
Don't disagree at all.

Super excited to find out everyone's results!
 

Justice1327

Well-Known Member
Joined
Jan 29, 2021
Messages
533
Location
USA
Also, I am extremely impressed with the seating accuracy of the AMP. I am assuming it seats by the ogive. I always have to sneak up on my seating depth by backing my die out a few thou and running it through a few times adjusting the dies as I go. Probably my crappy bras prep!
Might be the type of seater stem or even the variation in the bullets.
 

Korhil78

Well-Known Member
Joined
Jun 22, 2011
Messages
2,929
Location
New Mexico
I think it’s a pretty neat invention myself. Do you control seating depth by turning the die top higher or lower? I dont think I have seen that info yet.

Thanks for posting the videos.
I looked earlier but is there a base price yet?
 

justinp61

Well-Known Member
Joined
Jul 31, 2011
Messages
281
Very cool piece of technology. I don't load to the level needed to require the technology but I do enjoy learning.

You brought up a point late in the video that I thought about earlier in the video looking at the graph. It would be beneficial if there was a option in the software to start the trend at a force point, .1 lb for instance. Then record the force over the distance. I suppose that would depend on the resolution the scale is capable of. I'm sure they will be tweaking the software along as this gets in more hands and they receive more feedback.

Thanks for posting the video, as always enlightening and thought provoking.
 
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