All Around Mountain Rifle Build

MagnumManiac

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Feb 25, 2008
Messages
3,798
I do reload, and I shoot F-Class
I the 300 win mag with no break was not fun to shoot. I'm only 160 lbs and it kicked my butt pretty good.
To be honest I was kind of hoping I would get more people suggesting the 270 WSM. For whatever reason I feel that if I went the 300 route, I'd load 200-220 gn bullets. Something in my brain won't let me load lighter bullets...
If you find the 300 a bit too much and, there’s nothing wrong with that, then the MUCH milder recoil of the 270WSM is what I would recommend.
I also would throw in the 264WM. I have one, and a 270 Weatherby, recoil between them is identical with similar weight pills. Recoil is considerably lighter than the 300 mags.

Cheers.
:)
 
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Blueman

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Apr 12, 2014
Messages
101
Hand Skills, that is exactly the input I'm looking for. From all the responses it seems a 300 WSM is a good route. The 22" vs 24" barrel length is something I'll have to toy with to see what I want to do. The MPI stock I'm planning on using is very light, so it might balance with a 22", then again it might just be too dang light to "settle in".
 

Litehiker

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Joined
Sep 15, 2012
Messages
2,543
Location
Mojave Desert, Nevada
GOT SCHOOLED TODAY

Went to Sportsman's Warehouse today and examined the Browning X-Bolts and SAKO 85 rifles and truly got schooled. I was amazed at how the Browning X-Bolt actions were even smoother than the SAKO actions.

And the Browning triggers with their new leverage setup were just as good as the SAKO triggers. And that's saying a LOT.

Then the Browning X-Bolt prices were around $900. less and that's with Cerakote finish.

*Went back home and fondled my .300 Win mag Browning A-Bolt with renewed respect.

Now I can say that I'm looking very closely at the Browning X-Bolt rifles in 6.5 Creedmoor and no longer looking at the SAKO 85. I don't know if I'll keep the A-Bolt or not. It is "kinda customized" with the following:
1. black military grade custom Teflon finish over stainless steel (The rifle is a Stainless Stalker model)
2. extra Browning stock - laminated thumbhole, Marine Tex bedded and pillared
3. extra magazine
4. extra BOSS "brake" - solid but still micrometer adjustable, for those that don't like the blast of brakes (like guides ;o).
5. original polymer stock bedded and pillared with Bisonite
6. NECO fire lapped barrel - copper build up is very s l o w with this smooth barrel.

That's a lot of extras for one rifle.

Eric B.
BTW, the B.O.S.S. brake system is a micrometer adjustable brake that adjusts the barrel harmonics to different bullets/loads for maximum accuracy. It works.
 

jaybo

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Apr 18, 2012
Messages
130
Location
Louisiana
The 300 WM will give you way more versatility with bullet selection and knock down power. When hunting deer or sheep, use light bullets. Want to hunt elk, go with 180 or above. I have a Tikka 300WM that I upgraded. I put it on a McMillan Sako Hunter stock, changed the bottom floor plate to aluminum, and glass bedded it. I wanted the aluminum floor plate because if I torqued it over 30 inch pounds the plastic one flexed and was binding the magazine. The aluminum is torqued to 60 inch pounds with no problems. I’m shooting 200 grain accubonds but they are to the very edge of the magazine. It weighs in at 8 pounds but with the 200 grain bullets the recoil is quite a punch and I’m a pretty big fella. After a box of bullets, I have had enough and that is over a long period of time to allow for barrel cooling. It is a joy to carry but a bitch to shoot. The difference being, I can carry it all day but only shoot it for a second. Go with the 300WM 24 inch barrel and break it. With the wide variety in bullets, you can hunt just about anything. With a break on it, you’ll be able to shoot it comfortably even with heavy bullets.
 

jaybo

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Apr 18, 2012
Messages
130
Location
Louisiana
IMG_0821.jpeg
 

Timnterra

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Oct 18, 2012
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1,587
Location
Rapid City SD
[QUOTE="Blueman, post:
270 WSM 1:8 for the 170 Berger, 165 matrix, or 150 LRAB (I like that it can go heavy, but no crazy recoil)
7 SAUM/7 WSM 1:8/9 for any 160-180 gn bullets, there are lots to choose from. (this is harder to buy in stores if I'm in a pinch and need ammo.)
300 WSM 1:10 for anything in the 180-210 gn range. (My concern with the 30 cal is the recoil)6.5 cals seem a little small for elk imho, especially when shooting out to 6-700 yds[/QUOTE]

After reading all the responses and rereading your original post this is my opinion on the matter.
- 270 wsm is the best choice
1. It has the lowest recoil of the three short mag caliber choices.
2. It has widely available brass and factory ammo if you so desire. (This is the problem with both 7mm short mags)
3. Bullet selection is fine, pick the bullets you mentioned and shoot the one that your rifle likes the best. (This hand is over played by the 30 caliber crowd, I don’t care if there are 110-230 grain bullets I’m only going to shoot one of them! And it will be near the top of the weight spectrum)
4. 270 has the lightest bullets listed with the same powder column as the others which equates to the fastest velocity and should help counter balance the velocity lost with the shorter barrel.
I have owned rifles in all the calibers you listed and they will all work, but I think the 270 is the best choice for what you are wanting to do.
 

COBrad

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Joined
Jan 4, 2004
Messages
1,419
Location
Western Colorado
I’ve been shooting a custom .270 WSM for a few years now. Love it. I’ve killed a few elk with it shooting 140 gr bullets and they fell quickly. I don’t want any more muzzle brakes and after several .300’s I don’t want or need hard kicking rifles to kill elk, even at long ranges. As soon as this barrel starts losing accuracy I’ll replace it with an 8 twist for the heavy bullets. I’ve had two ultra light .300 WSM’s and recoil was too much trying to push 200 gr bullets at speed. The .270 doesn’t hit with the drama of a big .300 but critters end up just as dead and it’s a pleasure to shoot. My rifle weights 7lbs bare. Lately I’ve been hunting with a 454 Casull. I get my “kicks” out of that.
 

HTJ

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Joined
Mar 3, 2013
Messages
57
Ok gents, here's the scoop. My brother and I are wanting to build some light weight mountain rifles. I have a 10.5 lb STW for when the terriain is more favorable. I hunt in some nasty steep terrain. I cannot afford titanium actions, so don't go there. I've got a tikka in 300 win mag that I want to re-barrel with a proof sendero light, and possible do some work on the bolt to lighten it up. I'm planning on using a MPI lightweight stock (or similar), and optics no heavier than 20 oz. The build will mostly be for elk and mule deer, sheep if I draw before I die. My questions is, what caliber should I go with? And how long of a barrel? I'm thinking 22"?
Some of the calibers I've been thinking of are:
270 WSM 1:8 for the 170 Berger, 165 matrix, or 150 LRAB (I like that it can go heavy, but no crazy recoil)
7 SAUM/7 WSM 1:8/9 for any 160-180 gn bullets, there are lots to choose from. (this is harder to buy in stores if I'm in a pinch and need ammo.)
300 WSM 1:10 for anything in the 180-210 gn range. (My concern with the 30 cal is the recoil)
6.5 cals seem a little small for elk imho, especially when shooting out to 6-700 yds.

I do plan to put a titanium break on to reduce recoil. I'm pretty set on these few choices, just want some opinions. I'm proficient at reloading so that's what I plan on doing. Also don't try to convince me of SS Mag, they are interesting, but I want something with no fire forming.

Thanks in advance
Remington 270 or Remington 280 or even the 7 mag would be great choices for you to consider. They can be built in a very good Light mountain rifle classification and handle any North American big game animal. Choose a high quality Hunting bullet and a high quality hunting scope and you will be able to have a great mountain rifle. Some may not agree but I would recommend staying away from Berger bullets. Stick with those true design HUNTING Bullsts such as Nosler Accubond, Nosler Partition, Barnes, Hornady, Swift A frame, 130-140 gr for animals with max on the hoof weight up to 300 pounds and jump up to the 150-160’s for animals above 300 pounds in the hoof and you will have a very nice comfortable shooting mountain hunting rifle ready for any North America Animal at any Reasonable Hunting shooting distance. Best of luck. HT
 

35 Whelen

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Joined
May 21, 2018
Messages
355
Location
Montana
I have a Winchester 70 in 270wsm 24" barrel. I have not used it a lot but it's a good cartridge. I mostly use a savage 270 win. 22" barrel or a Montana rifle co. 35 whelen 24" barrel. I hardly notice the longer barrel. Recoil for me is no big deal but I know for some it is. For example my wife can tell the difference in 130gr. bullet and the 150gr. bullet in the 270 win. So if that's a big concern I'd go with the 270wsm. Yes the 300 will give more bullets and be a bit better for elk, but if you can shoot the 270wsm with less recoil better then the 300wsm you will make better shoot placement and that is more in portent then bullet size. Use the Berger 170gr. or Nosler accubond long range 150gr. and you will be fine.
 

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