Alaskan Guide Rifle

RH300UM

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Joined
Aug 25, 2008
Messages
1,177
Location
Southeast Idaho
Ok guys. I got some good news. The boss wants me to start guiding Brown Bear hunts in our area on the Alaskan Peninsula. Starting this May!! I couldn’t be more excited and willing to learn this endeavor. The big bears have always fascinated me.
I have my 375 RBH that I’ve been using up in the Alaska arctic to guide with. I had to use a 1 type fits all bullet because of the dynamics involved with multiple species and distances involved if I had to dispatch a wounded animal. So I was using the 281 grain Hammer hunter. I now have a 338 RBH coming to fill that roll. Now the 375 becomes a dedicated Brown Bear guide rifle. I’ll be pulling the 3x15 nightforce off it and transferring it to the 338 RBH. I have a 2x10 nightforce to put on the 375 now.
I am thinking the 299 sledge hammer for the 375 is the top choice for its new duties. But I’m wondering if I should have a 305 claw hammer ready in the pipe for those times a charge may take place in the searching for a wounded Bear in the thick alders if and when it happens.
What say you guys?
I’ve made my mind up as you can tell but I’m interested in hearing your input on this
 

Jerry M

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Joined
Aug 20, 2006
Messages
609
Location
Glen Burnie MD
Never shot a big bear, only a medium one with a .270 Win.

Did shot a big Cape Buffalo and lion. The 300 grain Hornady round nose, in a .375 H&H were just right for the Cape Buffalo but a little hard for the lion.

The bullet you choose needs to shock at close range without penciling through or coming apart. What about Swift A-Frame - basically a bonded Partition?

Good Luck

Jerry
 

RH300UM

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Joined
Aug 25, 2008
Messages
1,177
Location
Southeast Idaho
Never shot a big bear, only a medium one with a .270 Win.

Did shot a big Cape Buffalo and lion. The 300 grain Hornady round nose, in a .375 H&H were just right for the Cape Buffalo but a little hard for the lion.

The bullet you choose needs to shock at close range without penciling through or coming apart. What about Swift A-Frame - basically a bonded Partition?

Good Luck

Jerry
The aframe is great bullet. I use those in my backup rifle. Clients use it once in awhile if they have problems with theirs. 300 rum using 200 Aframes
 

adam32

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Joined
Nov 14, 2007
Messages
2,096
Location
Kookifornia
If your life depends on it I would stick with tried and true, A-Frame or a Partition.

I like Hammers as much as anyone but in a life or death situation I would use what's been proven to work. Not saying Hammers won't work, but I'd let someone else prove it first.
 

Elk Hunter 338

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Feb 19, 2010
Messages
1,605
Location
Pocatello Idaho
If it was me and had to have a dedicated big bear stopper I would probably have a 458 or 416 of sorts. I mean the 338's and 375's have been proven time and time again and you have more experience dealing with big fuzzy Volkswagens than me but like I said if it were me and needed a dedicated peninsula big rig it would be a 22" 458 or 416 shooting A-frames that will travel from nose to tail! I mean there's a reason most PH's use 505 gibbs and big 416 or 458
 

Pmacc60

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Joined
Feb 8, 2013
Messages
236
I guess the main concern is to protect a client and yourself with this rifle . I have no experience with big bears so my advice is worth every dime your paying for it. However you may want to check out the Remington 7600 carbine in 35 Whelen. With a 250 grain Nosler Partition your getting about 3000 lbs of energy and four rounds of ammo . It is a compact rifle and easy to carry but the most important factor is that it gives you fast follow up shots and puts a lot of bone crushing power in a fast handling carbine. It’s also a clip fed rifle so reloading is as easy as putting in another clip!
 
Last edited:

ofbandg

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Joined
Jul 26, 2015
Messages
181
I am kind of with pmacc60 on this. I do like big calibers for bear but if it is all about protection I would not be using a bolt action. I prefer lever actions with red dot sights, (actually green dot in my case because I have astigmatism), although I have seen guys mover pretty fast with pump guns. I use bolt guns for all my hunting but when my *** in on the line I go with guns that point short and fast.
 

RH300UM

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Joined
Aug 25, 2008
Messages
1,177
Location
Southeast Idaho
Ask Lyle - he probably has the answer for you.
Oh he knows me and my love affair with fine and accurate weapons. I have no doubts in my choices and he doesn’t either. He asks my advice at times on certain things related to firearms. He is very knowledgeable but extremely busy and it is hard for him to keep up with the changes for the industry.
 

JMW67

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Joined
Dec 6, 2012
Messages
776
Location
TEXAS
Ok guys. I got some good news. The boss wants me to start guiding Brown Bear hunts in our area on the Alaskan Peninsula. Starting this May!! I couldn’t be more excited and willing to learn this endeavor. The big bears have always fascinated me.
I have my 375 RBH that I’ve been using up in the Alaska arctic to guide with. I had to use a 1 type fits all bullet because of the dynamics involved with multiple species and distances involved if I had to dispatch a wounded animal. So I was using the 281 grain Hammer hunter. I now have a 338 RBH coming to fill that roll. Now the 375 becomes a dedicated Brown Bear guide rifle. I’ll be pulling the 3x15 nightforce off it and transferring it to the 338 RBH. I have a 2x10 nightforce to put on the 375 now.
I am thinking the 299 sledge hammer for the 375 is the top choice for its new duties. But I’m wondering if I should have a 305 claw hammer ready in the pipe for those times a charge may take place in the searching for a wounded Bear in the thick alders if and when it happens.
What say you guys?
I’ve made my mind up as you can tell but I’m interested in hearing your input on this
450 marlin lever gun shooting a 400gr. barnes
 
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