Africa

Josh P

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Joined
Dec 23, 2012
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67
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WASHINGTON
Of all the post I've been reading in this thread and I may be mistaken. I dont remember anyone saying that they have shot an eland with a 270wsm and that is their go to cartridge for eland. Most animals when shot shrink when they hit the ground the eland is not one it is thick and massive. My point is this it's BIG! and potentially 2000 plus pounds any animal in this weight class in not your average plains game critter deserving of a large caliber heavy bullet. Seen elk killed with a 243 not ideal but can be done doesn't mean it should be or is best.
 

gillettehunter

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Jul 8, 2010
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Gillette Wy
You have read a variety of opinions on the topic. Looks like to me about 2:1 in favor of a heavier rifle for the eland. Maybe I'll suggest that you look at it this way. In my opinion a .270 is about as light as I want to use for elk. I have killed or been in on killing around 70 elk. Those that hunt them a lot generally use something bigger. There are plenty of exceptions, but this is not a bad generalization. Talk to Broz about killing elk. He sometimes helps with over 100 in a year. Talk to bigngreen about bullets on elk shoulders. He was a meat cutter for a time. Look up his thread on the subject. Now a big eland bull will be about 3 TIMES the size of an 5 point bull elk. How much thicker is the shoulder on an eland? What do you do if you only have 2 days to hunt eland and you get less than ideal angle to shoot on the last day? Do you take the marginal shot or let him walk?
The truth is your .270WSM with a good 140-150 gr bullet will do the job if you put it where it needs to go. The problem is you should wait for the ideal angle to take the shot. That may require you to pass on a number of opportunities that would of been appropriate with a bigger caliber/bullet. As long as you accept your limitations then have at it. Would like to read a hunt report when you get back.
I've been to Africa 3 times, hunted with 5 different companies in 3 different countries. I have taken around 25 head of African animals. I have some basis for comparison.
Bruce
 

BTL

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Oct 21, 2009
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Many different points of view, a lot to consider. One thing that hasn't been addressed is the issue of shooting a rifle that you are competent with; taking a 375 H&H does little good if you're not comfortable shooting one. Accuracy is key, everything else takes second place. I've got a 300 Weatherby but wouldn't consider taking it because of the bloody recoil. I just don't shoot it well.
My brother has brought his 375 to Africa 5 times so far and he will be going again with a first time friend in a couple months. He is obviously comfortable with his 375 as am I, up to a point. I would not want to spend an afternoon working up loads while shooting it from a bench, but shooting it a half a dozen times in an outing over the course of a day it is fine. To me it is not a whole lot different than shooting my 338.

Like you said it all boils down to your comfort and confidence level. Learning African animal anatomy for shot placement is critical. No pocket behind the shoulder shots in Africa, no vitals to hit there.
Good luck to you and enjoy everything you see and ask a lot of questions of your PH.
BTL
 

rbTanzan

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Joined
Sep 11, 2012
Messages
90
I happen to think that the handloaded 416 Rigby is the cat's meow for Africa. 338 WinMag works great, too. And bang for buck it's hard to beat the 375 Ruger (available in the Mossberg Patriot should one want to try an inexpensive experiment or a classic Ruger African for a few hundred $$ more).

HOWEVER: YES!, there is no problem with a 270, 10" twist, if the hunter is careful. Hunters are always careful, right? With a .277" a shooter needs to be even more careful and might have to pass up on a shot that would be OK with a more powerful cartridge. But a 270 can take anything in Africa in the right hands with the right bullets (though not necessarily legal these days for DG).

I would concur with the 145gn SledgeHammer or the 129gn LRX in .277" bullets. Take the shot when it feels right. Just ... right ... there . . . squeeze //kboom . . . thup and down.
 

ofbandg

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Jul 26, 2015
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132
Woodleigh makes a 180 grain .270 bullet and it works fine in my rifles for accuracy and performance. I generally load 140 grain for deer and sheep but carry a few of the 180's in case I run into something a little more intimidating. They are not popular bullets in North America but they are in the rest of the world.
 

Jeffpg

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Oct 14, 2010
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Mississippi and Texas
Having shot 100 plus animals in Africa is a 270wsm your recommendation for eland?
Josh P, You’ve obviously strayed outside of your lane. I have simply expressed my personal opinion about his inquiry, based on my experience. I never recommended anything to anyone that that hadn’t already decided on.

The op stated this: “Going to Africa this fall and will be taking my 270WSM. Going to be shooting animals from small deer sized to a 1500 pound Eland. I want to use 150 grain bullets. Thinking of the Swift A frame or the Hammer. Anyone have any recommendations?”

Simple reading and comprehension reveals that the gentlemen has already decided his cartridge and is only asking about his potential choice of bullet.

If you hunt a few more years and shoot about 100 more critters in Africa, your experience just might equal mine, but you’ll need to add in a few big bull giraffe (taken with a 30.06 and a crossbow) several blue & black wildebeest (easily known to be tougher than the larger eland) track and harvest the incredible Cape Buffalo bull (in the company of 2 male lions), sit 14 hour nights in a Leopard blind on a 23 day leg of a 37 day multiple country hunt, spend a week hunting honey badger, bush pig, hyena and other predators at night... I worked and safaried there for years in multiple countries and I could go on but I believe my experience and accomplishments justify my opinion.

By the way, I shot my eland off the sticks inside 100 yards with a perfectly placed shot using a 180 grain Norma Oryx with the 30.06 and he was very quickly as dead as they can get, but not knowing your stalking patience nor shooting prowess, I recommend you use as much gun as you can handle, and I wish you happy hunting.
 

geraldhawaii

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Mar 5, 2015
Messages
4
Going to Africa this fall and will be taking my 270WSM. Going to be shooting animals from small deer sized to a 1500 pound Eland. I want to use 150 grain bullets. Thinking of the Swift A frame or the Hammer. Anyone have any recommendations?
Hello LongestShot,

I have been to Africa 4 times to hunt on different safaris. I would agree with those that are recommending a larger caliber for the eland. They are extremely large and tough animals. I killed an eland in 2017 with a 338 Remington Ultra Mag using 225 grain Nosler Accubonds with one shot at a distance of 125 yards. I've used Nosler accubonds, Nosler partitions, and Barnes TSX all with great results. Also used Barnes TSX bullets and Nosler Solids in 375 H & H for one shot kills on Cape Buffalo. So, Nosler and Barnes are great bullets. Never heard of Hammer bullets. But, as suggested in other posts, please do some reading/research before you decide on what caliber to take to Africa.
 

Josh P

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Dec 23, 2012
Messages
67
Location
WASHINGTON
Many different points of view, a lot to consider. One thing that hasn't been addressed is the issue of shooting a rifle that you are competent with; taking a 375 H&H does little good if you're not comfortable shooting one. Accuracy is key, everything else takes second place. I've got a 300 Weatherby but wouldn't consider taking it because of the bloody recoil. I just don't shoot it well.
I agree with you recoil can be hard on a shooter but seldom or never shooting hard hitting rifle won't get you comfortable shooting them. Practice in moderation will get you shooting well enough for Eland they are big. Shooting off of shooting sticks is a good way to minimize recoil and likely how you will be shooting in Africa.
 

eastbank

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Sep 25, 2018
Messages
76
Location
pa. u,s.A.
I have been on 5 hunts in three countries in Africa and have taken 61 animals about 90 percent with a CZ 550 in 375 H&H mag. and the others with a 7mm mag-300 win mag and .243, but for me the extra margin the .375 give a person when things go south more than out weight any negitives it has. and with the draw blood you bought it rule, a eland that gets away wounded can cost major $$$.
 

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Josh P

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Dec 23, 2012
Messages
67
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WASHINGTON
Having shot 100 plus animals in Africa is a 270wsm your recommendation for eland?
Josh P, You’ve obviously strayed outside of your lane. I have simply expressed my personal opinion about his inquiry, based on my experience. I never recommended anything to anyone that that hadn’t already decided on.

The op stated this: “Going to Africa this fall and will be taking my 270WSM. Going to be shooting animals from small deer sized to a 1500 pound Eland. I want to use 150 grain bullets. Thinking of the Swift A frame or the Hammer. Anyone have any recommendations?”

Simple reading and comprehension reveals that the gentlemen has already decided his cartridge and is only asking about his potential choice of bullet.

If you hunt a few more years and shoot about 100 more critters in Africa, your experience just might equal mine, but you’ll need to add in a few big bull giraffe (taken with a 30.06 and a crossbow) several blue & black wildebeest (easily known to be tougher than the larger eland) track and harvest the incredible Cape Buffalo bull (in the company of 2 male lions), sit 14 hour nights in a Leopard blind on a 23 day leg of a 37 day multiple country hunt, spend a week hunting honey badger, bush pig, hyena and other predators at night... I worked and safaried there for years in multiple countries and I could go on but I believe my experience and accomplishments justify my opinion.

By the way, I shot my eland off the sticks inside 100 yards with a perfectly placed shot using a 180 grain Norma Oryx with the 30.06 and he was very quickly as dead as they can get, but not knowing your stalking patience nor shooting prowess, I recommend you use as much gun as you can handle, and I wish you happy hunting.
I do comprehend what was written and I'm not doubting your hunting prowess. I am not in any way an expert in hunting in Africa as is obvious as I've only shot 8 animals there. What I do know and am quite aware of is I saved up my money for a once in a lifetime trip for me. You have been many times and will go again I'm sure but for me and someone like myself who has never been. The excitement the thought that this is my chance and I may not have another opportunity to get the animals on my list takes over and the best shots aren't always made. That being said a larger gun makes up for some poor judgment. I may have strayed into your lane but I never doubted your abilities or prowess and I do use as much gun as I can handle to dispatch my prey as quick as possible.
 

bulldog3006

Member
Joined
Aug 8, 2018
Messages
5
Location
Pittsburgh
Have been to Africa twice and have shot 12 "plains game" animals all with a 270 WSM and 150 grain nosler partions including an eland and all went down quickly. I also have 1 cape buffalo with a 375 ruger. A coupe of comments and thoughts after reading the input from others.

1. My number 1 factor/recommendation would be to shoot the gun you are most accurate with and comfortable shooting - especially from shooting stix.

2. Bullet placement is by far the most important factor and obviously that ties to #1 above. I watched guys with a 375 make a poor or miss 60 yard shot because they were scared of the rifle.

3. The eland was only 20 yards away as we were fortunate to make a really good stalk so I defer to anyone that has shot more than one eland or has shot them at a distance.

4. I would think any quality bonded bullet will work well (take your pick - partition, hammer, swift A frame - which is what I used on the buffalo, etc). Just use the one that shoots the best in your rifle and don't overthink the set up.
 

snapshooter

Member
Joined
Feb 6, 2019
Messages
13
Location
kansas
DSCN3954.JPG Hi Longest shot:
After reading most all the posts and on 4 safari's in Africa I would recommend the A frame or Partitions in the heaviest weight your rifle will shoot with good groups they just work. Also a 15 to 25 lighter grained load for the smaller game that prints almost the same. I also now take 2 rifles that I am so comfortable practicing with Sticks, kneeling, prone and improvised backpack that I do not notice the difference exchanging them one for the other leaving me with a backup I am super comfortable with and not resorting to a loaner (I had this happen on my first hunt when a stock setback and split out it had to be MacGyvered in the field with hide glue, beer can shims and electrical tape plus drying time) this gives me 40 rounds for each with a light and heavy hitter split between. Remember African animals are tough very very tough compared to North American game their kill zones are also some what different with the forward heart. I personally like to use a Ruger #1 in 3006 with a 26" barrel so almost equal to a win Mag with less recoil and weight. I took a Sable at over 400 meters with a 180 Partition that passed through and broke both shoulders knocking it down like a truck hit it. We thought it had been a perfect shot and started walking to get it, then aprox. 1 minute later that Sable got up an ran off like nothing happened none of that bone had hit the heart. Thanks to my tracker and PH. I have that animal. An Eland is still on my list next hunt but I will be using a 338 win mag or larger there is no replacement for displacement. Also a pocket African game shot placement book is your best friend and a very minor expense I now have 2 one for camp to prepare around the nightly fire and one that stays in my hunting jacket as over there targets of opportunity just happen. Good luck and plan on a lot of walking that Sable took me 15 to 18 kilos over 21 days worth every step that Eland will probably be more they cover ground fast.
 

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