Advantages Of Using The Long Range Spotter by Shawn Carlock

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This is a thread for discussion of the article, Advantages Of Using The Long Range Spotter, by Shawn Carlock. Here you can ask questions or make comments about the article.

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Buffalobob

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and even handier a light weight hunter orange vest for both the spotter and hunter the wear to spot each other while the shooter is being guided in by the spotter.
Even when hunter orange is not mandatory, this is a extremely important when dealing with tracking a wounded animal. Knowing where the other person is and if it is safe to shoot is the difference in hesitating to look for the other person before taking a follow up shot on a wounded animal and being able to know immediately that it is safe to fire and finish the animal.
 

Aussie Powder Burner

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Spotting scope power

Shawn, could you advise what you consider the best power for a long range spotting scope?Specifally small targets rather than large game please?

I have a new long range rifle set up to shoot rabbits. My goal is 1000yds.
I am considering the Leupold Tactical spotter 10-40x60 as it can be had with the TMR reticle. This would allow precise adjuctment calls by the spotter.
I also have a Mark 4 scope with the same reticle.

Aussie Powder Burner
 

Shawn Carlock

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That is the scope I use myself id the MK4 HD with TMR reticule in it. It is not a clear as a Swaro or Leica but not as heavy, big or expensive. I have also noticed that it is much easier reading mirage with the Leupold. The Leica I use on occasion is much better at cutting mirage but also makes it harder to read it. All in all I really like the Leupold for an all around hunting scope. I have used it to locate, call dope and spot for shots well over 1000 yards on rockchucks.
 

Aussie Powder Burner

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Shawn
Thanks for your prompt reply.
I have only seen a couple of rockchucks once on a visit to USA on Pikes Peak.
I recall they are much larger than a rabbit - whart you guys call cottontails?
Would the Leupold have sufficient clarity/contrast to see rabbits at 1000yd?
Thanks and happy new year
 

yobuck

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im a new member here so im just beginning to read these articles. ive been hunting long range for about 40 years in my home state of pa. i thought this article was very well done. i would encourage especially beginners to follow these instructions for a succesful hunt. i have but one suggestion, and that pertains only to equiptment. tripod mounted binnoculars are far superior to a single spotting scope. both for finding game, and calling shots. i fully realize weight is a factor for hunters on foot. also cost is less with the single spotter. that said, binnoculars are the key element of all our equiptment. i have twin spotters in a machined bracket weighing about 5 lbs. perfect for a backpack. total cost about $400, plus tripod. pa. has a large population of long range hunters. i would say at least 75% are using various brands of twin spotters in machined brackets. a single spotter is as rare as a 35 rem.
 

DR308

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MR. Carlock: Having a really great spotter is worth as much as your rifle and loads, maybe even a little more. I can not agree with you more that with out a great spotter, even the best shooters WILL be handicapped at the longest ranges. Sorry this reply was so late, but my computer went hey wire on me and it took me longer than planed to get it up and running again.

Thank you for your great articles in here. They are very informative, and for the novices like us out here, we can use all the truthful help we can get. I will be looking forward to reading much more from you in the future. Good luck this ELK season also. I have never known you to have an empty freezer. [unless you gave away to much]---------- Your friend in town--------JD :D
 

Lyons7STW

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Well written article. Most "tac" schools request a shooter bring his spotter to train with. train like you play... Intresting concept... Believe I heard that somewhere before

I was blessed with a spotter has been guiding for 30 plus years, is a superb shot himself with any common weapon and can call 'em faster than I can send 'em. I have yet to go home with an unfilled big game tag while he is at my side! My trophy wall and a lot more would be empty without him.

Thanks dad for 29 yrs of training and instilling a passion for the hunt. Good luck on the mountain goat, waited a long time for that tag! Wish I could be there to return the favor.
 

SBruce

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I wholeheartedly agree Shawn! Thanks for posting this article.

Worked really well last year for us to use the spotter technique. I was the spotter and I would range the target and run the ballistic computer and take wind readings. I was doing this while my partner was getting into position and preparing for the shot. I use the same spotting scope you mention, but built prior to the HD and it has no reticle.

I was laying down right next to the shooter but the the back blast from the brake was moving me just enough that it took maybe 1/2 second to get back on the target. Any advice there? Or is this fairly normal? I was running the scope on 15 to 20X for better field of view just due to this.

Additionally, I feel that reading mirage would greatly improve a spotters ability to read wind changes while looking through the scope. I can't look at a wind meter and at the target through the scope at the same time..............However, I don't consider myself to be any kind of expert on reading mirage. What are the chances of you writing an article on reading and applying mirage to the shot? Since mirage is fluid, perhaps video would best explain it.? Do you know of or suggest any good reading or video of dealing with mirage?

This pic was of our successful effort at spotter/shooter cooperation. At the time, we actually had 3 guys on site and the 3rd was taking wind readings while I was runing the Axim and judging the animal/watching his body language, and communicating with the shooter about shot placement............ You might recognize the rifle, it's one of yours.:)

625 yd antelope, bedded down facing/quartering toward us. The Edge hit him right where he wanted to, it was about the only shot we had that wouldn't destroy the cape/meat and yet be quickly lethal.

Thanks again, and I'd really like to get more info on reading/applying mirage dope. Oh, one other thing.......when on the practice range I was attempting to call the hit via reading the vapor trail. I was unsuccessful. Every call I made was low, when the hit was actually about a minute high of my call. This was at 950 yds. Any advice on that subject?

This isn't letting me attach a picture at the moment.??

Oh well, here's a link to it.

http://www.longrangehunting.com/forums/f72/testing-picture-77615/#post545182
 
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yobuck

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try sitting behind and slightly to one side of the shooter. it will work far better.
also attempting to call shots off the vapor trail isnt reccomended. wind will affect that also. hits are what counts. when you cant see hits stop shooting. often you will completly lose the vapor trail at the peak of it's ark. especially at longer distances on windy days. another reason not to rely on that.
id have everybody watching for hits rather than fooling around with other stuff. the more eyes the better.
we dont anticipate conditions after the first shot. just shoot and correct off that if necessary. unless of coarse it runs off a considerable distance.

thats our system, id be interested in shawns viewpoint.
at least thats our system as for shooting.

i'll tick some of you off by saying most eastern long range hunters are way ahead of most western hunters as for glassing and calling shots.
that has nothing to do with ability, but rather mindset over equiptment.
 

SBruce

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try sitting behind and slightly to one side of the shooter. it will work far better.
also attempting to call shots off the vapor trail isnt reccomended. wind will affect that also. hits are what counts. when you cant see hits stop shooting. often you will completly lose the vapor trail at the peak of it's ark. especially at longer distances on windy days. another reason not to rely on that.
id have everybody watching for hits rather than fooling around with other stuff. the more eyes the better.
we dont anticipate conditions after the first shot. just shoot and correct off that if necessary. unless of coarse it runs off a considerable distance.

thats our system, id be interested in shawns viewpoint.
at least thats our system as for shooting.

i'll tick some of you off by saying most eastern long range hunters are way ahead of most western hunters as for glassing and calling shots.
that has nothing to do with ability, but rather mindset over equiptment.
Yea, I see your point in watching for actual hits, but since we were shooting cardboard on the practice range, I wasn't able to spot hits. Just thought I'd try the vapor trail thing that particular day. Makes sense that wind would mess this up.

I did in fact loose the trail as it disapeared above the skyline, but I was able to pick it up as it dropped down below the horizon and into the target. Problem was; it appeared to be going below the target instead of into the cardboard.?

Can you elaborate on the Mindset over equipment thing? Not sure I follow you.

Thanks for the response.
 

alcesgigas

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i have twin spotters in a machined bracket weighing about 5 lbs. perfect for a backpack. total cost about $400, plus tripod. pa. has a large population of long range hunters. i would say at least 75% are using various brands of twin spotters in machined brackets. a single spotter is as rare as a 35 rem.
Please elaborate: Example-"I have twin Fijinon 20x60x80s in a machined mount on a good solid tripod." I've thought this would be the apex of a spotting scope setup, but wasn't aware that it could be done without, eventually, being painful to use. This is really good news--please tell more! And thanks.
 
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