Active Elk hunting outer layer clothing and boots for snow/rain?

jd126

Well-Known Member
Joined
Jan 4, 2019
Messages
188
Location
Texas
The Lowa’s are good so far. I have owned them for about 2 years now. No issue with the waterproofing. Last year in Colorado I was crossing a small stream. My foot broke through the ice and I went about 12-18 inches into the water. Between the boots and the gators I stayed dry. It was all a quick motion in the water and back out. I didn’t let it soak so to speak. To me they are very comfortable. That said I have not tried other brands like Kenetrek or Crispi out in the field. I bought the Lowa’s because they were instantly comfortable to my feet and had the least slipping around inside the boot. They just fit me well. I do wear these Lowa’s everywhere that is outdoors. Shooting range, local PRS match’s, fishing, back yard work etc.
The sweating last year on two separate winter hunts was not fun. That’s why I brought up the vents. I’m going to give that a try this year.
 

WalksLikeADeer

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Joined
Jan 25, 2016
Messages
135
Location
Oregon
Congrats on your hunt. I put in for Steens a couple of times but never drew.
I cannot offer area specific advice, since all my elk hunting has been west of the Cascades.
Nor have I purchased anything like Sitka.
My 2¢:
  1. Except for my hip boots and Wellies, I've never had a "waterproof" boot stay that way. I prefer leather that I can oil up well. Currently my insulated Danner Loggers do nicely for that. As long as I'm not standing in water, my feet are dry. The added benefit is the boots breathe, and I don't soak by sweat from the inside like I do with Gore Tex lined boots. I also find these are the quietest. Nothing like crunching your way through the forest or a rocky outcrop to announce your presence. Whatever you get, be sure you break them in and get your feet used to them.
  2. Rain gear and outer layers: my single most important criteria is it be quiet when rained on. I bought an outfit one year and it was like drumming in the rain. For pants I'll use Columbia PFG. I wore out my pair of Kuhl oil cloth trowsers. Those are fantastic but I haven't bothered trying to replace them. After years of trying to find a good coat, I borrowed a Driza-bone duster. That thing is awesome. Sideways rain and I'm dry. I traded for it.
  3. Warmth: Layers, period. Base layer, second layer if need be, and top layer. Something that dries out fast and is comfortable. Base layers are thermal poly-pro wicking (think snowboarding or climbing). If it's cold enough, I'll use my Icebreaker middle wear. Wool top, quiet, water repellent trousers. Nice thing about layers is you can peel off to accommodate temperature swings.
  4. Socks: you cannot say enough to highlight how important these are. I bring several pair.
  5. Gloves: Whatever fits and gives you good tactile response. I use a pair of thinsulate / removable fingers.
Thank you for your insight, a lot of good info there. I got a chuckle out your comment about the rain drumming on your gear. I haven't really notice that lately and also thought how quiet I could stealth around the forest, like a cat...until I got the Sound Gear ear plugs that brought my hearing back to normal and realized how loud I really was! lol! Thanks.
 

Stk

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Joined
Nov 24, 2016
Messages
274
I have a pair of Lowa Renegade GTX that are maybe 2.5 years old and a pair of Tibets about a year old. The waterproofing in the Renegades is pretty non existent now. My feet get soaked even walking through damp grass. I’ve decided to retire them now after having wet feet all turkey season. They’re very comfortable, but I need to keep my feet dry. I just replaced them with a pair of Crispi Thor...too early to tell how they’ll be. I do love the Lowa Tibet’s after putting a ton of miles on them last deer/elk season, but they’re a heavy boot more suited to late fall or winter hunting. Paired with Kenetrek gators and the right pants, I stay warm in dry even when stomping through deep snow.

Awesome tip on the pit and hip vents! I alway forget about that feature when considering this subject. Even with GORE-TEX and other "breathable" fabrics I think you will sweat climbing out of a canyon bottom. If you think about it, it is probably really the only way to adequately let the heat out and still stay somewhat covered from the snow and rain.

How are the Lowa's waterproofing after a few years? Thanks.
 

WalksLikeADeer

Well-Known Member
Joined
Jan 25, 2016
Messages
135
Location
Oregon
I have a pair of Lowa Renegade GTX that are maybe 2.5 years old and a pair of Tibets about a year old. The waterproofing in the Renegades is pretty non existent now. My feet get soaked even walking through damp grass. I’ve decided to retire them now after having wet feet all turkey season. They’re very comfortable, but I need to keep my feet dry. I just replaced them with a pair of Crispi Thor...too early to tell how they’ll be. I do love the Lowa Tibet’s after putting a ton of miles on them last deer/elk season, but they’re a heavy boot more suited to late fall or winter hunting. Paired with Kenetrek gators and the right pants, I stay warm in dry even when stomping through deep snow.
 

WalksLikeADeer

Well-Known Member
Joined
Jan 25, 2016
Messages
135
Location
Oregon
Too bad about the Renegades. I just returned some Danner Vitals for the same reason. We'll see how customer service handles it. I would be interested to see how the Crispi's hold up?
 

Pacecount

Well-Known Member
Joined
Nov 23, 2015
Messages
97
Location
Boise, Idaho
Boots?...

If you have time to break in a good pair of boots consider Kennetrex... I also have a pair of Crispi’s GTX which are much easier to break in.

Breaking in the Kennetrex before a hunt is critical.... make sure you do a bunch of hills in them.

good hunting!
 

Triple BB

Well-Known Member
Joined
Dec 12, 2002
Messages
475
Location
Wyoming
Kuiu outershell with a puffy jacket underneath. If yer gonna spend the money get the best out there. In the past five years I've watched all the guides in my outfitter's camp migrate from Sitka to Kuiu. I made the switch year before last and I'm glad I did...
 

jd126

Well-Known Member
Joined
Jan 4, 2019
Messages
188
Location
Texas
Kuiu outershell with a puffy jacket underneath. If yer gonna spend the money get the best out there. In the past five years I've watched all the guides in my outfitter's camp migrate from Sitka to Kuiu. I made the switch year before last and I'm glad I did...
What Kuiu outer shell do you use?
 

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