Action & Barrel Centerline

Discussion in 'Gunsmithing' started by Edd, May 12, 2015.

  1. Edd

    Edd Well-Known Member

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    A while back, I read a comment, from a custom rifle builder, that the action and barrel should be positioned exactly halfway in and halfway out of the stock.

    When looking at pictures of custom rifles, it appears there is usually more out of the stock than in the stock. Sometimes it looks like there is a lot more above the stock.

    Is there some standard for this?
     
  2. shortgrass

    shortgrass Well-Known Member

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    I was taught (in gunsmithing school) that the barreled action was to be half in the stock. I see many synthetics that are not. Much depends on the design of the stock in which "cool factor" plays a big part these days. Way back when (when I was in school) we worked with wood, synthetics were in their infancy. Lots of the basic "rules" (accepted norms) of stock design get ignored these days.
     
  3. J E Custom

    J E Custom Well-Known Member

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    The reason the barreled action should be half way in the stock (On the center line) is to get the maximum contact for the action and bedding.

    If it is more than Half way and it is bedded the bedding will lock the action in the stock
    because it will be below the centerline of the diameter.

    If a barrel Is below the center line of the stock I normally shim it with the pillars and use the bedding to fill the gap.

    And like Shortgrass said, it is the right way to set the barreled action in a stock.

    And besides all of the right reasons, It just looks better.

    J E CUSTOM
     
  4. shortgrass

    shortgrass Well-Known Member

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    For that matter, I've seen some wood stocks where the metal wasn't half way in, too. Usually by someone more concerned with "highly figured" wood instead of "fit & finish". That "fit & finish" is where the dollars involved with stockmaking are. The cost of the wood can be minimal compared to the labor costs. Unfortunately, that senario has been turned around by some, concentrating on the 'pretty wood' , not the skill needed to turn that wood into a presentable stock.
     
  5. Hired Gun

    Hired Gun Well-Known Member

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    If building from scratch 1/2 is the right way but I also use what I call the show line which is where the stock is relieved along the loading port. I like the stock and metal to be exactly flush right there. The ideal is when both can be achieved at the same time. It's the mark of a pro to have that perfect. With McMillan we can usually hit both right on.
     
  6. FearNoWind

    FearNoWind Well-Known Member

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    I've always interpreted the half in/half out standard as a maximum depth to prevent trapping the action/barrel in the stock. Allowing the bedding material to exceed that limit means the parts can't be drawn out when necessary because of their bedding depth. Did I miss the point?
     
  7. shortgrass

    shortgrass Well-Known Member

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    You missed the point.
     
  8. Edd

    Edd Well-Known Member

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    What about the clearance between the barrel and the stock?

    How much should there be?
     
  9. Hired Gun

    Hired Gun Well-Known Member

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    Depending on the flexibility of the stock between .035" for sporters and at least .062" for heavy barreled rigs.
     
  10. J E Custom

    J E Custom Well-Known Member

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    That Depends on the type of use it will see.

    If it is a fine piece of wood and the service is minimal I want the clearance to be minimal for
    fit and function, looks are very important in these conditions but it should be clear of stock induced pressure in order to be accurate.

    If a bipod is to be used, more clearance is needed to prevent the stock from contacting the barrel when being used. There is no magic number because different stocks have different stiffness's. and as long as it is not in contact when being used that is all that is necessary for looks and function.

    If the rifle is in hard service then more may be necessary to help in cooling also. but in this case I recommend a vented stock to help, and keep the fit looking good.

    The main reason for clearance is to minimize/eliminate external pressure/effects on the barrel,
    so a compromise between looks and function must be reached.

    Just my opinion

    J E CUSTOM
     
  11. shortgrass

    shortgrass Well-Known Member

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    Depends on the individual stock. If it's so flimsy it needs a 1/16" on each side I don't need it! But, in our "drop-in" world that's pretty common.
     
  12. shortgrass

    shortgrass Well-Known Member

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    The only exception might be a true bench rest rifle.
     
  13. J E Custom

    J E Custom Well-Known Member

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    +1

    Some Stocks are not worth the effort because of there flexibility. The Tupperware stocks are worthless In my opinion for this reason.

    Some of the guys on this site have saved them, but with great pains and effort. But the problem
    is They still look crappy in my opinion.

    Also I have not found a true drop in stock that did not need some adjustment to the fit.

    J E CUSTOM
     
  14. Edd

    Edd Well-Known Member

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    I don't think my stock would be considered flimsy. It is a McMillan Remington Hunter style. The forend is pretty hefty.

    McMillan lists it as large enough for a #8 contour. My barrel is a lot lighter than a #8 but it is still pretty heavy. It is 1.0" diameter at the tip of the forend and has a muzzle diameter of .840" at 26 inches.

    I can feel the forend flex when the weight is positioned on the bipod stud. The best I can tell, with what I have to measure with, the gap changes between .005" and .010" at the tip of the forend depending where the weight support point is.