Absolute hammer bullets and sever overbore chambers

HARPERC

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This is all very interesting. I’m setting up a 7 RUM right now and I don’t really need this to be a long range rifle. I was leaning toward the heavier bullets, but with a 9.5 twist barrel, y’all have my wheels turning, thinking about smaller and faster now. Any recommendations on which hammer would work well?
I have a 7 RUM and shoot 131s at 3679. Only Hammer I ever recovered was from a buck shot at 311 yds. Bullet entered at throat, travelled full body length and lodged under hide at rump after going through ham.
I'm sold!
Both good choices, I would likely go with the 131. I've always drifted toward better stability when talking terminal performance. The extra velocity of the 131 is also a positive. Going lighter could be fun, but sometimes finding the right powder combinations in bigger cases, and smaller bullets can be a challenge.

Of course if here is time, you may want to order faster twist barrel. The Hammer light weights can be sun as fast as you like without negative effect, and it opens the door for playing with the heavy weights also.
 

Idaho Hunter1

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I got my first order of hammer bullets this weekends I’m loading them for a friends rifle so decided to try them myself. My experience:

Friends rifle is a 26” kimber .300wm 178 absolute hammers running 3175.

Mine is a 28” proof, .300 wm using 196 hammer hunters, I’m getting 3280 easily, it kinda scares me to be honest. But no heavy bolt, primers look nice.
Ninja,

Mind sharing the specifics? Powder, primer, etc…AND twist rate.

Thanks
 

T3ninja

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I gave the kimber back to my buddy along with the load data.

As for mine, I’m using a 28” proof 9.4 tw. Using ADG brass, Ramshot Magnum 81.8 gr. I’m right around .020-.025 off lands. The load I actually settled on is giving me 3233 avg. I did run the velocity up almost 3400 FPS. But accuracy started getting a little wild. 3300 was giving me .75-.8 MOA But I wanted better. So I fiddled with it a little more and ended up with 81.8, 3233. It’s pretty consistent at .3-.4 moa. I can live with it. It’s still blows me away that they’re shooting this FAST!!
 

WahooYahoo

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I’m interested in the terminal performance and velocities at 750-1000yds. All of the data bits I find are at much shorter ranges.
I suspect that a 120 grain, 30 cal projectile peels off pretty fast after 600-700 yds when the BC is midrange, even if it started at 3600fps
 

CMP70306

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I’m interested in the terminal performance and velocities at 750-1000yds. All of the data bits I find are at much shorter ranges.
I suspect that a 120 grain, 30 cal projectile peels off pretty fast after 600-700 yds when the BC is midrange, even if it started at 3600fps

Per my ballistics calculator I find they seem to hit 1800 fps somewhere between 750 and 950 in all the calibers and loads I’ve looked at with the larger magnums (181gr HH at 3200 FPS in a .300 WM) holding on the longest. Since my shots won’t exceed 600 yards where I hunt that works perfect for me.
 

WahooYahoo

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I suspect thet the big hollow point will aid expansion with less velocity that a tipped mono. + for expansion, - for BC.
I have a couple of more questions:
  • What velocity is required to get expansion and petaling?
  • How does the Hammer bullet compare to a TTSX, Badlands or other tipped mono (purely in terminal performance)?
 

ButterBean

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I suspect thet the big hollow point will aid expansion with less velocity that a tipped mono. + for expansion, - for BC.
I have a couple of more questions:
  • What velocity is required to get expansion and petaling?
  • How does the Hammer bullet compare to a TTSX, Badlands or other tipped mono (purely in terminal performance)?
There is no comparison
 

Wedgy

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  • How does the Hammer bullet compare to a TTSX, Badlands or other tipped mono (purely in terminal performance)?
The Barnes and badlands are a very hard copper alloy that have higher engraving pressure that will generally yield lower velocities and the bullet will mostly stay in one piece sometimes to the detriment of penetration. There are no radiating petals that shear off to cause periphery damage.
Hammer and Cutting Edge are a softer copper alloy where the nose comes apart yielding a flat nose bullet shank penetrates thru, the flat nose creating a large wound cavity.
The photo is a Badlands Bulldozer that hit an elk broadside in the neck at 883 yards around 2,100 fps then turned up and lodged in the same side backstrap, 12" of total penetration and did not break the vertebrae. that is a VERY hard bullet.
bl2.jpg
bl.jpg
 

FEENIX

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The Barnes and badlands are a very hard copper alloy that have higher engraving pressure that will generally yield lower velocities and the bullet will mostly stay in one piece sometimes to the detriment of penetration. There are no radiating petals that shear off to cause periphery damage.
Hammer and Cutting Edge are a softer copper alloy where the nose comes apart yielding a flat nose bullet shank penetrates thru, the flat nose creating a large wound cavity.
The photo is a Badlands Bulldozer that hit an elk broadside in the neck at 883 yards around 2,100 fps then turned up and lodged in the same side backstrap, 12" of total penetration and did not break the vertebrae. that is a VERY hard bullet.View attachment 282218View attachment 282219
Congrats to whoever harvested the elk at 883Y. Is there an "actual" comparative analysis done with Hammer bullet for the same game at the same distance, and of course a successful end result - harvesting the game?
 

Wedgy

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Congrats to whoever harvested the elk at 883Y. Is there an "actual" comparative analysis done with Hammer bullet for the same game at the same distance, and of course a successful end result - harvesting the game?
That was Cody's bull(picture) and mine was 987 yards with the 227 Hammer from a 7 twist 300 Rum(carcass picture) and it blew a nice exit, quartering towards and uphill. My personal opinion is that Cody's 9 twist barrel isn't enough to spin that bullet for penetration and hard copper isn't for long range bullets as it is the opposite of lead, but at close range lead can be too soft.
The hard alloy copper is what they use for electrical wire etc. and is readily available but the soft alloy only comes from a couple places, USA not being one of them. I live in CA and have shot non lead for a long, long time and have observed crazy things from copper bullets that I think can only be explained by insufficient spin and I think the softer copper alloy is the best choice for both short and long range hunting.
And yes it looks like he's about to shoot his pecker off with the 44 mag bear gun LOL. There's a great story with Cody's bull hopefully he will write a trip report.
codybull.jpg
shothammer.jpg
 

FEENIX

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That was Cody's bull(picture) and mine was 987 yards with the 227 Hammer from a 7 twist 300 Rum(carcass picture) and it blew a nice exit, quartering towards and uphill. My personal opinion is that Cody's 9 twist barrel isn't enough to spin that bullet for penetration and hard copper isn't for long range bullets as it is the opposite of lead, but at close range lead can be too soft.
The hard alloy copper is what they use for electrical wire etc. and is readily available but the soft alloy only comes from a couple places, USA not being one of them. I live in CA and have shot non lead for a long, long time and have observed crazy things from copper bullets that I think can only be explained by insufficient spin and I think the softer copper alloy is the best choice for both short and long range hunting.
And yes it looks like he's about to shoot his pecker off with the 44 mag bear gun LOL. There's a great story with Cody's bull hopefully he will write a trip report. View attachment 282316View attachment 282317
Cool! This is why I am a heavy for chambering bullet fan. Congrats.
 
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