A reasonable DIY antelope hunt?

Clem Bronkoski

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Joined
Jun 23, 2019
Messages
249
Location
Locust Gap, PA
My friend and I would like to do a DIY antelope hunt. We're both retired and on fixed incomes so we don't have a bunch of money to spend. We've been on a couple years ago when we both had jobs and could afford an outfitter but the situation has changed. Any suggestion will be accepted. Thanks
 

memtb

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Joined
Dec 30, 2013
Messages
1,608
Location
Winchester, Wy.
JMO, and should be valued as such!

If your hunt state is Wyoming.....the G&F site gives information about the percentage of government ground and ease of access. The more

Extended hiking is generally “not” required......having an area with lots of road or two-track access is a plus. You are much better served driving and glassing......save the walking for the actual stalk, if needed!

Bring camping gear, an rv is great! Rather than spend money on motels and restaurant food.....live near or in your hunt area. This also provides you with much more “rest time”. 3 or 4 days of hunting all day, coupled with the travel time to/from your home base (motel) will quickly take it’s toll on your energy reserves. Add to this the elevations you may be dealing with, will also add to your fatigue factor.....a good, long nights sleep will quickly become a priority!

Good glass, it doesn’t have to be the best European, can help you find and determine the game quality.

Clothing: Again, I’m referring to Wyoming.....expect any weather condition you can imagine. Temperatures can run from single digits to 80’s/‘90’s, from dust to mud, snow, rain! While walking is not generally mandatory, two pair of well broken-in boots would be great. If things get wet, one pair drying while you wear the other. Also, if you tent camp.....bring the best, sleeping bag you can warrant. Quality boots (no sore feet) and a good bag (good rest) can make your hunt much more pleasant!

Firearms: nothing special needed. Use whatever you feel very comfortable with. Anything from the .24’s ( some states allow .224’s) to big magnums work nicely. Just be prepared and comfortable out to 400 yards or a bit beyond.....and you should be fine!

A GPS with the program showing hunt areas and property boundaries can also be of some help!

Well, that’s a few of my suggestions! memtb
 

Clem Bronkoski

Well-Known Member
Joined
Jun 23, 2019
Messages
249
Location
Locust Gap, PA
Memtb you're spot on. I've hunted MT on one of my antelope hunts. It was with an outfitter and I shot a beautiful buck with my .270 Win that missed the book by 1"! Saw literally hundreds of antelope on that ranch and a couple buck that I would have shot but the outfitter would simply say "nah, that's just a buck".
I have all the gear. Its just a matter of deciding where to go and getting a tag.
If I go on another hunt its going to be just for the joy of hunting antelope again. Its a fun hunt and I don't need a "trophy" class buck. Any one I get will be a trophy.
I'd like to check out Texas and New Mexico because I can also visit my daughter in TX and use her place as a stop over.
 

trout-n-salmon

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Joined
Nov 23, 2009
Messages
143
What MemTB said. Went to Wyoming last year after not getting my usual Montana tag. Never hunting in Antelope there before hunted the week after the opener (heard the opener was a zoo), never saw another hunter, over 30 bucks in only a few hours, and was done and back to the bar by noon with a solid Antelope. The beauty of Antelope hunting. My favorite hunt.
 
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