7mm 180 grain Bergers

etisll40

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Has anyone annealed the ogive of the 7 mm 180 grain Bergers? Does it perform better on game? If so, how is it done? Is there a youtube demonstration or info available on the net?
 

Derek M.

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never heard of annealing a bullet. To me that spells inconsistency. Leave the bullets alone. Just sort them by weight and length to ogive. Prep your brass thoroughly and turn your necks if you have a tight neck chamber. Weight sort your brass. Weigh each powder charge. I've spent a LOT of time doing every measure I can think of and have learned about for better accuracy and repeatability only to find out some of it is not necessary in 90+% of my hunts.
 

etisll40

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Rochester, NY
The newer harder jackets of Bergers had reports of poor terminal performance and thus annealing the bullet solved it. They weren't opening. Just what I read, I was going to load some for hunting, I guess I'll see if they shoot first.
 

Derek M.

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The newer harder jackets of Bergers had reports of poor terminal performance and thus annealing the bullet solved it. They weren't opening. Just what I read, I was going to load some for hunting, I guess I'll see if they shoot first.
These were their "hunting" bullets?
 

LongShot4Real

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Oct 27, 2012
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Annealing bullets?

Here are some of my thoughts on bullets.

1. Full-metal-jacket (solid) bullets penetrate too much, zipping through with minimal tissue damage.

2. Frangible varmint bullets break up quickly. Sometimes this destroys heart/lungs for a quick, clean kill, but sometimes it merely ruins a bunch of meat without reaching the vitals.

3. Soft points (traditional cup-and-core bullets with soft lead cores in thin metal jackets) can mushroom perfectly, break into two or three pieces, or even flatten like a pancake, depending on where they land.

4. Bonded-core bullets usually expand less but retain more mass for deeper penetration.

5. Controlled-expansion bullets—either via internal walls, bonded cores, monolithic cores or combinations—expand 1.5-2X, retain 90 percent or more mass and pass through, even after striking major bones and muscle groups.

What bullets should you use? The ones you believe in. Just understand their limitations and don't expect any to drop game in its tracks every time.

Below is some examples from barnes web site. granted this is lab info but it give you an idea of some accuracy comparisons. this of course if subjective. i have held off the long range hunting for the very reason Bergers, SMKs, Swamp Works, Nosler Custom Competition......on and on...........are match bullets not hunting bullets. In my opinion they are all great for accuracy and competative shooting. However this isnt competition this is hunting. And if your hunting shouldnt you use a hunting bullet. I beleive given time the market will follow suit which they have. FYI Nosler i beleive just announced what i call a Berger Killer..... its the Accubond Long range. And barnes is following suite with the LRX high bc hunting bullets. I love two holes in my animals and in my opinion controlled expansion is best....to each there own.

 

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