73 and still backpack hunting

Discussion in 'Physical Training For Mountain Hunting And Backpac' started by Litehiker, Aug 24, 2016.

  1. Litehiker

    Litehiker Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    1,336
    Joined:
    Sep 15, 2012
    I was 73 April 4, 2016. I'm in pretty good shape for a man of 53 according to my doctor. No heart problems (complete cardio-vascular workup in 2014 with outstanding results) and no knee problems. So I think I have another 10 years of backpacking in me - but maybe not backpack hunting with the extra weight of a scoped rifle and butchering gear.

    I live in the Las Vegas valley and in summer I have to work out on our treadmill set at max angle and with 4x6 blocks under it. I put on heavier work boots and a 35 lb. pack, turn on the TV to Star Trek and do an hour at 2.2 miles an hour.

    Starting in September I will go into our nearby Spring Mountains twice a week with the same pack and hike at 8,000 to 10,000 ft. to check my ability to hunt those altitudes in northern Nevada this October.

    In my 30s and 40s I cross country ski raced and bike raced in the summer in western Pennsylvania so I have a competitive athletic background and know how to train.

    BUT, since i hunt alone I carry a SPOT satellite locator beacon with me to call for help so the coyotes won't gnaw on my carcass if I have a big accident. I recommend it to all hunters because we are not always with friends during the day. Jus' saying'...

    Eric B.
     
    kimberyote likes this.
  2. Len Backus

    Len Backus Administrator Staff Member

    Messages:
    6,405
    Joined:
    May 2, 2001
    Eric

    Sounds like you are going to be very ready this fall.

    SPOT makes my wife much more supportive of my solo adventures.
     
  3. Marble

    Marble Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    361
    Joined:
    Jul 19, 2012
    I'm looking into getting a SPOT for my dad. He's 66 and inn pretty good shape. But either of us should have one. We hunt of horses deep into the mountains.

    Congrats at being 73 and still making it up into the high mountains.

    I recently built a long range rifle for my dad to use in CO from a few different ground blinds. Been trying to extend his time in the woods.
     
  4. jotrot

    jotrot Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    237
    Joined:
    Dec 25, 2014
    great advice and very happy for you are able to enjoy the things you like to do
     
  5. Litehiker

    Litehiker Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    1,336
    Joined:
    Sep 15, 2012
    Thanks gents,

    Thanks for your supportive comments. This forum is a great place for good info. You sometimes just have to winnow out the "chaff" to find it.

    I agree, a satellite rescue beacon gives everyone peace of mind. And I feel that all of us on this site are smart enough to know what a true life-threatening emergency is when we press the S.O.S. button that will likely bring a rescue chopper.

    Some hikers think that button is for things like resupplying them with water because they were too stupid to plan ahead. Grand Canyon park rangers have had several of these false alerts and it's frustrates them.

    There is another rescue beacon called the De Lorme "In Reach" beacon that many like.
    I've heard that Garmin bought De Lorme, for what it's worth.

    Eric B.
     
  6. Barrelnut

    Barrelnut Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    3,178
    Joined:
    Dec 16, 2013
    I've used a SPOT since they first came out. Still use the original one. Go lots of places where cell phones don't work - alone. Been looking at the SPOT global phone. Ya playaround a ways back in the woods on steep hillsides with heavy weight, knives, and guns - in snow!
     
  7. yobuck

    yobuck Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    1,066
    Joined:
    Aug 23, 2008
    Well tell your dad it works. I'm now 81 and still going strong so long as I'm satisfied
    to go where my jeep rubicon can take me, which is some pretty bad places. And we
    don't bother with the ground blinds.
     
  8. RMulhern

    RMulhern Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    796
    Joined:
    Jan 2, 2003
    I'm 76, played football six years and served Uncle Sam for seven years and had my arse run off toting an M1 Garand and a full backpack...plus!! I've climbed the Colorado mountains starting in 1960 and never missed a year for 20 years but those days are over. I'm still in good shape...still hunt with a backpack but I take it off when I get in this:

    [​IMG]Bumblebee by Rick Mulhern, on Flickr

    And THAT is as high as I'm gonna get...or climb! My main 'workout' is holding down a recliner and sitting in a nice den with A/C during summer watching a baseball game an on occasion I pump the handle on the recliner so I can hike to the frig and retrieve a Sam Adams beer! If I feel real energetic I may walk out to my reloading room and reload a few rounds for my 308 Winchester with which I have laid low many a whitetail buck...kinda like this one:

    [​IMG]Kansas whitetail 2014 by Rick Mulhern, on Flickr

    From my mid-twenties to age 65 my 'training' consisted of climbing into the seat of an agricultural aircraft and doing my best to keep my arse out of the tree tops and wires so I could go back and climb the mountains again! And I loved every minute of it!!
     
  9. Marble

    Marble Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    361
    Joined:
    Jul 19, 2012
    For our elk hunting there is no places to road hunt. We hunt off of horses.
     
  10. RMulhern

    RMulhern Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    796
    Joined:
    Jan 2, 2003
    What do you do.....lead them all the time??

    I always hunted on a horse....a few thousand miles! Lot better than leading them!!
     
  11. Marble

    Marble Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    361
    Joined:
    Jul 19, 2012
    I guess we use them for travel and packing, sometimes we just lead them if we think their are lots of animals in the area.
     
  12. RMulhern

    RMulhern Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    796
    Joined:
    Jan 2, 2003
    I've led a few across narrow saddles in my day!:D