6.8 Western

Old rooster

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Joined
Jan 9, 2019
Messages
1,032
Location
Montana
Hello Old Rooster, just read this reply about necking a 300WSM up to 35 caliber. I black bear hunt with a .358 Winchester and a 35 Whelen. With either of these two cartridges you cannot go wrong. And.....if you want a real powerhouse in .35 caliber there's the often, forever overlooked and forgotten .358 Norma magnum. If I were ever so fortunate to find myself going to Alaska on a bear hunt I would build a .358 Norma, they are easy to load for and they are tack drivers. But............for now it's going to be the .35 Whelen, and it too is a great, versatile cartridge. I was going to try the 223gr Shock Hammers in the Whelen for black bear the last season, however did not get enough range time in with them. But next year I will take one with them. For me what I have found is that if one were to compare the "new", latest and greatest, 5000 yard, anti-tank, Trex killers that just came out on the market with some of the "older" original cartridges and did a true comparison there's really not that much difference worth the fuss over!! I would be curious to find out how many there are on this forum who are/were interested in a .35 caliber cartridge who have ever looked at the ballistics of the 35 Whelen or ever looked at the ballistics of the .358 Norma magnum. And it's not different with this "new", 6.8 Western. The .270 WSM has been around for nearly 20 years, yet............now we are shortening the cartridge case, thus reducing powder capacity, changing the barrel twist, and NOW it too is the latest and greatest cartridge on earth. EVEN greater than the 6.5 Creedmoor.
I hope you get to hunt bears with your 35 Whelen.I have a 358 winchester in a Browning BLR steel receiver and have owned 2 different 35 Whelens and got in a pinch and sold both 35 Whelens and wish I could have not sold the Remington.It was a tack driver.
I shot a muley at 200 yards with the 358 Win 4 years ago at 200 yards and she dropped like a rock.That was the last doe tag I have gotten for doe mule's.
Maybe one day I will get back into the 35's and replace the 35 Whelen's I miss.
 

big johnson

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Nov 24, 2020
Messages
139
Location
E. Wenatchee, WA. 98802
Been thinking about getting a 6.5 reamer on this case, several grains more than the 6.5 prc and should push the 156 EOL great ,but why invent the wheel , just go 26 nosler and burn alot more unicorn pooooooo.
 

Calvin45

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Apr 13, 2019
Messages
1,393
Location
Nipawin, Saskatchewan, Canada
I hope you get to hunt bears with your 35 Whelen.I have a 358 winchester in a Browning BLR steel receiver and have owned 2 different 35 Whelens and got in a pinch and sold both 35 Whelens and wish I could have not sold the Remington.It was a tack driver.
I shot a muley at 200 yards with the 358 Win 4 years ago at 200 yards and she dropped like a rock.That was the last doe tag I have gotten for doe mule's.
Maybe one day I will get back into the 35's and replace the 35 Whelen's I miss.
You know it’s funny, I don’t know very many people that own, let alone shoot, 35 caliber rifles of any kind, but the ones that do pretty much unanimously attribute a sort of magic to their killing power, in a way I don’t see attributed to the .33 and .37 bores on either side. It’s probably nothing, but I find it very interesting nonetheless.
 

Alibiiv

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Jun 17, 2013
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1,554
Location
Rhode Island
You know it’s funny, I don’t know very many people that own, let alone shoot, 35 caliber rifles of any kind, but the ones that do pretty much unanimously attribute a sort of magic to their killing power, in a way I don’t see attributed to the .33 and .37 bores on either side. It’s probably nothing, but I find it very interesting nonetheless.
Right now there are three of us who hunt with 35 Whelens, there's no mystery about them they shoot, are easy to reload for and the ones we have are extremely accurate. We have been using Barnes 225gr TSX bullets, bear drop like they have been hit with lightening. I have also used the .358 Winchester on a bear a few years ago due to an issue with a rifle. Again that bear was hit broadside, behind the shoulder about five-inches, broke both shoulders, the bear ran about 30 feet and dropped; Barnes 200gr TTSX BT. The only mystery to me is that the shooting industry is more concerned about selling new rifles, in new cartridges, and ignore a round that does everything that the older cartridges have been doing for years. If you would like to see and real impressive cartridge, take a look at the .358 Norma magnum. Again another cartridge that is overlooked by the shooting industry.
 

Calvin45

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Joined
Apr 13, 2019
Messages
1,393
Location
Nipawin, Saskatchewan, Canada
Right now there are three of us who hunt with 35 Whelens, there's no mystery about them they shoot, are easy to reload for and the ones we have are extremely accurate. We have been using Barnes 225gr TSX bullets, bear drop like they have been hit with lightening. I have also used the .358 Winchester on a bear a few years ago due to an issue with a rifle. Again that bear was hit broadside, behind the shoulder about five-inches, broke both shoulders, the bear ran about 30 feet and dropped; Barnes 200gr TTSX BT. The only mystery to me is that the shooting industry is more concerned about selling new rifles, in new cartridges, and ignore a round that does everything that the older cartridges have been doing for years. If you would like to see and real impressive cartridge, take a look at the .358 Norma magnum. Again another cartridge that is overlooked by the shooting industry.

Oh I have…and you liked my post in this thread one page back about having long desired an old husqvarna rifle in .358 Norma haha…I have a friend who got an old husqvarna in 9.3x62 which for all intents and purposes is a European version of a .35 Whelen (actually came before the whelen but that doesn’t matter)…he’s pretty happy with it, hoping to use it for moose in the bush.
 
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