6.5 Creedmoor 156 gr Norma Alaska bullet

sable tireur

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Oct 8, 2010
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6.5x55 Swedish Mauser with 156 gr. Alaskan bullet

This is a well-proved softpoint bullet with a soft gilding metal jacket which gives rapid and massive mushrooming.

iu

6.5x54 M-S

I've used the 156 gr. Alaskan bullet for this cartridge in a 1903 Carbine for deer hunting in the thick woods of the UP. It fits the rotary magazine and opens up at lower velocities. My loads typically run around 2,600 fps. Perfect for the shorter range, deep woods white tail deer.
 

Zen Archery

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Dec 27, 2012
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722
Depends on your goals. I will drop hogs all day with them under 125 yards. But once you plug the number many 100-140gr bullets deliver equal to more energy than the big 156 due to its size and limited fill case capacity because of the length of the bullet. Now there's nothing like having the confidence of shooting one of the heaviest bullets in the caliber. But If you are looking for beyond 200 yard shots this would NOT be my go to bullet.
 

AFraser

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Mar 28, 2012
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57
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Rutland, UK
All those Scandinavian 156gr 6.5mm bullets are great in terms of terminal impact, and they can be very accurate. The main issue is wind drift.
They move about twice as far as a 143 ELD-X, which begins to be an issue even at 200 yards.
For example: 10mph wind at 90 degrees = 5.5" @200 yd & 14" @300 yds.
 

ImBillT

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Feb 19, 2021
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Location
USA
Should be excellent for large game at close ranges.

The BC is so terrible that for long ranges(over 300yds…maybe even 250) I’d pick a different bullet.

DO NOT bother listening to folks concerned with kenetic energy. Kenetic energy is not important in collisions. Momentum is far better at describing collisions, and you’ll find that the 156 has more momentum than lighter bullets. If you’re shooting s large animal, I would not hesitate to use that bullet…not for one second.


If you’re shooting in brush, you can’t do much better. Pointy bullets moving fast can be deflected considerably by leaves and twigs, but blunt nosed bullets moving slowly tend to deflect very little.
 

michaelfelix13

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Apr 16, 2015
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70
Thank you good to know.
Should be excellent for large game at close ranges.

The BC is so terrible that for long ranges(over 300yds…maybe even 250) I’d pick a different bullet.

DO NOT bother listening to folks concerned with kenetic energy. Kenetic energy is not important in collisions. Momentum is far better at describing collisions, and you’ll find that the 156 has more momentum than lighter bullets. If you’re shooting s large animal, I would not hesitate to use that bullet…not for one second.


If you’re shooting in brush, you can’t do much better. Pointy bullets moving fast can be deflected considerably by leaves and twigs, but blunt nosed bullets moving slowly tend to deflect very little.
Thank u
 

hadjii

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Joined
Sep 25, 2012
Messages
286
Location
Iowa
I have a load worked up in my 264 win mag with them. Getting 2800 fps out of a 24" barrel, and accuracy is well below 1 moa. My plan was to use this load for Louisiana whitetails. Should be excellent.
 

Warbird2006

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Joined
Apr 15, 2012
Messages
388
All those Scandinavian 156gr 6.5mm bullets are great in terms of terminal impact, and they can be very accurate. The main issue is wind drift.
They move about twice as far as a 143 ELD-X, which begins to be an issue even at 200 yards.
For example: 10mph wind at 90 degrees = 5.5" @200 yd & 14" @300 yds.
Its a MOOSE hunting bullet. :) Moose is big,
 
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