45/70 for large bear... ammo?

DMP25-06

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Oct 6, 2010
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421
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Haslet , Texas , 76052
This is just my OPINION , as I have not had to stop a charging bear , or any other animal that is capable and intent on killing me .
Unless you get a shot into the brain , spinal cord/central nervous system where they attach to the brain , or destroy the spinal column at the front shoulder junction , you will not be able to drop that animal in it's tracks .

Starting at .338" diameter , and larger calibers , shooting heavy-for-caliber Partitions , A-Frames , solids , or .45-70's shooting heavy hard-cast projectiles , even Elephant rifles , or very large-caliber pistols , you will still have to hit those spots to stop them .

That being said , those heavy , deep-penetrating projectiles that have the mass and structure , just might intersect the spine at a different location , after having missed your primary aiming point .


DMP25-06
 

Jerry M

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Aug 20, 2006
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681
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Glen Burnie MD
Going to British Columbia with two rifles has some issues. You need claim both on the Canadian side of the border. Register both should be one fee. If you're flying to your spike camp weight is always an issue. When we flew into camp for Caribou we were limited to 65 pounds per person. If you only have an elk license once you kill an elk your hunt is finished. You will need the buy another type of hunting license to be legally eligible to walk around armed, unless BC has different laws then Quebec. Guides do concern themselves with visits from games wardens. Also, where are you going to store your primary rifle on your walkabout?
Since you are hunting with a .340 WM, why the need for another rifle. I believe that caliber would stomp any bear.

Good Luck

Jerry
 

dogz

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Joined
Jan 11, 2006
Messages
976
Location
SWMT
This is just my OPINION , as I have not had to stop a charging bear , or any other animal that is capable and intent on killing me .
Unless you get a shot into the brain , spinal cord/central nervous system where they attach to the brain , or destroy the spinal column at the front shoulder junction , you will not be able to drop that animal in it's tracks .

Starting at .338" diameter , and larger calibers , shooting heavy-for-caliber Partitions , A-Frames , solids , or .45-70's shooting heavy hard-cast projectiles , even Elephant rifles , or very large-caliber pistols , you will still have to hit those spots to stop them .

That being said , those heavy , deep-penetrating projectiles that have the mass and structure , just might intersect the spine at a different location , after having missed your primary aiming point .


DMP25-06


Spot on DMP25-06--------stopping a bruin charge is all about CNS. At the speed in which they can come it's a one or two round fight then game over one way or another!
 

Laguna Freak

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Jan 5, 2015
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537
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South Central Texas, just north of the Wall
Know how you feel before going in, if you are going to hesitate or not want to use a firearm, then bring spray and only spray, because seesawing back and forth between should I pull my spray or gun, when you're reluctant or unwilling to pull a gun will render you useless, the bear will be on you by the time you make up your mind.

If you're willing to accept the consequences, be decisive if the time comes and be ruthless, stop the threat.

And you should still also have bear spray, may provide you a better out given the specific situation and the law will like that you had it.
Not discounting the load/bullet wisdom you shared. But this too is spot on and just as important. I would only add that if the bear is inside 50 or 60 yards when first seen, and the gun is not in your hand, proper use / direction of spray may be the best first defense that will buy time to bring the gun to bear. Pun intended.

IMO, 45-70 is big and most likely often in the saddle scabbard. I’d be carrying a 44 rem mag loaded with 285 gr cast swc on my right hip, bear spray on my left, and be practiced and proficient drawing both simultaneously. In addition to firing practice.
 

xsn10s

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Mar 7, 2016
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2,430
IMO, 45-70 is big and most likely often in the saddle scabbard. I’d be carrying a 44 rem mag loaded with 285 gr cast swc on my right hip, bear spray on my left, and be practiced and proficient drawing both simultaneously. In addition to firing practice.
When I went to Alaska I carried a 45-70 with handloaded 350gr Hornady's. It was for primarily caribou but I felt better having a lever gun for bear protection. But the firearm that was with me all the time was my S&W M29 4" with 300gr flat nosed hard cast bullets.
 

Guy M

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Jun 4, 2007
Messages
807
Location
Chelan Co, Washington
Not discounting the load/bullet wisdom you shared. But this too is spot on and just as important. I would only add that if the bear is inside 50 or 60 yards when first seen, and the gun is not in your hand, proper use / direction of spray may be the best first defense that will buy time to bring the gun to bear. Pun intended.

IMO, 45-70 is big and most likely often in the saddle scabbard. I’d be carrying a 44 rem mag loaded with 285 gr cast swc on my right hip, bear spray on my left, and be practiced and proficient drawing both simultaneously. In addition to firing practice.

Problem with the handgun, is that he's hunting in British Columbia. It's easy to take a rifle to Canada, but the handgun isn't so easy...

Otherwise ya, I like having a good handgun with me when I'm fishing, hiking or camping in bear country. :)

Regards, Guy
 

2ndson

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May 14, 2020
Messages
123
Location
OK
The 45-70 would be fine for bears. You can dern near load them to 458 Win specs in the right rifle, but thats not really necessary.

Figure it out, the 338 win mag, its quite popular for big bears in Alaska, the 300 grn 45-70 in a marlin shoot it about as fast.

Dont know if I'd complain much about the trejectory, lots of buffalo were killed with them at 1000 yards or such.

I spent 22 years in alaska, in bear country I carried a 375 H&H, but the only bear I killed was with a 7mm Rem Mag.
 

Huntfly

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Joined
Jun 29, 2021
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161
Location
Ga
I like your choice of rifles but also agree a hot 45/70 will get the job done, good bullets the key.
 

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