375 cheytac VS 338 lapua

Texasmade

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Ok guys. Have an older gentleman considering a 375 cheytac that doesn't do much online so I thought I would ask. I know the cheytac is superior in ballistics. I can run the ballistics on my app so no need to hear about that. But I also thought the price to load it would be dramatically more but after some research I'm not seeing that much more. How good is the Cheytac brass for the 375? Its actually cheaper than 338 lapua brass. Bullets is the main concern. Seems like if you want to run the Cutting edge bullet it is 1.60ish a piece VS the 338 bullet costing about .82 a piece. Powders cheap enough I don't see a big concern. So my question is for what I'm seeing you can load a cheytac for about a dollar more a round. Is that true? Is the cheytac accurate even say 500 yards? Is the Cheytac brass any good? Any and all discussion between the 2 would be great. Anybody that has had both I would love to hear the pros and cons. Also one of his concerns was if anyone made an integral action for the cheytac...I saw Defiance had something back in the day but don't see it anymore
 

Joel Russo

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Before you can offer your customer a recommendation, or ask for our input, you first need to define what his intended purpose of the rifle will be.
 

Texasmade

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shooting targets out to around 2000 yards. Could very well be somewhat breezy when that happens too
 

royinidaho

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I agree with Joel's comment.

But to compare the two cartridges is pretty much like comparing apples and zucchini.

The Chey takes bigger bolt face and much larger action, though a Lapua could be built on the larger action.

The difference between a 338 CT Imp and a 357 CT improved is nothing but a 50 grain heavier bullet. If one is limited to SMKs.

I had a 338 RUM that I did everything your customer wants to do. The Lapua is better simply because of the brass. Well worth using that cartridge.

I shoot a 375 Allen Magnum with is nothing more than a 375 CT improved. It's also pretty much identical to the 375 SnipeTac.

Brass is another iffy thing. So far, I've learned, selection is Jamison, Bertram and CT.

The brass I have is Jamison but built for a slightly different reamer than that used for the chamber as it was explained to me. Which I don't have the slightest idea of what the smith was talking about.

Some of the necks are a little thick which causes pressure problems, loose primer pockets and extractor mark with max load. Max load I 142.5 Retumbo and 350 SMK.

I'd say the only reason for a 375 CT would be to show off/ ego trip/bragging rights and a helluva grin when a 5 gallon bucket sized rock explodes at 1K or better.

Other than that compared to a 338 Lapua it's pretty much a waste of time.

Just my tho'ts.....
 

Texasmade

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I agree with Joel's comment.

But to compare the two cartridges is pretty much like comparing apples and zucchini.

The Chey takes bigger bolt face and much larger action, though a Lapua could be built on the larger action.

The difference between a 338 CT Imp and a 357 CT improved is nothing but a 50 grain heavier bullet. If one is limited to SMKs.

I had a 338 RUM that I did everything your customer wants to do. The Lapua is better simply because of the brass. Well worth using that cartridge.

I shoot a 375 Allen Magnum with is nothing more than a 375 CT improved. It's also pretty much identical to the 375 SnipeTac.

Brass is another iffy thing. So far, I've learned, selection is Jamison, Bertram and CT.

The brass I have is Jamison but built for a slightly different reamer than that used for the chamber as it was explained to me. Which I don't have the slightest idea of what the smith was talking about.

Some of the necks are a little thick which causes pressure problems, loose primer pockets and extractor mark with max load. Max load I 142.5 Retumbo and 350 SMK.

I'd say the only reason for a 375 CT would be to show off/ ego trip/bragging rights and a helluva grin when a 5 gallon bucket sized rock explodes at 1K or better.

Other than that compared to a 338 Lapua it's pretty much a waste of time.

Just my tho'ts.....

Thanks for your input!!!

Any body know how good Cheytac 375 brass is? Is the Defiance Renegade going to happen? I feel like you have to have an integral rail if your going 375. Will stiller Make one for you that's integral? Thanks. I figured up $2.50 a shot for the 375
 

DM770

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Will the rifle have to be carried at all or shot for outside the prone or bench positions? Both have recoil to be dealt with, but the 375CT will be greater. Both rifles will get you to 2 grand without a problem.
On the brass issue. The brass that is available for the LM is excellent. Is there even an available supply of 375CT brass and what quality is it? One is in question and one is not. Easy answer for me.
 

royinidaho

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Thanks for your input!!!

Any body know how good Cheytac 375 brass is? Is the Defiance Renegade going to happen? I feel like you have to have an integral rail if your going 375. Will stiller Make one for you that's integral? Thanks. I figured up $2.50 a shot for the 375

Correctly head stamped brass, IIRC, from the builder was $4.00 each. Either that or $2.00???

I haven't done an accurate cost analysis yet but I treat them like its closer to $5.00 a shot. Especially if loaded warm and get less than 4 shots per case. Which I don't do any more.....

Unless you go with special bullet offerings which are iffy in some rifles, a fella is stuck with SMKs which aren't plentiful and have a halfway decent bc but don't seem to expand consistently.

I've made a modification to them which gives ~42" less drop than the unmodified SMKs at 1860 yards or so. With a bc well over 0.800 the 375 CT Imp. begins to stretch its neck over lesser cartridges.


Also the CT based rifles will come out a bit heavy. I sweat blood and made a ton of chips and dust getting mine down from 19 pounds to only enough below the Idaho 16# limit for the certified digital scale first two digits to read one five. 15.94 pounds to be precise.:)
 

joshua99ta

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$4.00 each for CT brass? Where'de you get that price? I checked 2 weeks ago and it was like $2.10 or $2.50? dont remember which actually
 

Joel Russo

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Listen to Roy, he knows what he's talking about...
Keep an eye out for the new Curtis action, we will have a dedicated Lapua and .408 action that will have the integrated rail and a whole bunch of other goodies.
 

jfseaman

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Thanks for your input!!!

Any body know how good Cheytac 375 brass is? Is the Defiance Renegade going to happen? I feel like you have to have an integral rail if your going 375. Will stiller Make one for you that's integral? Thanks. I figured up $2.50 a shot for the 375
The brass life is supposed to be at least 4 reloads for CT brass. The "feel" of the brass is very "hard". I annealed necks. I think 5 total firings is realistic.

I have just begun the reloading process for my shooting buddy so my hands on is pretty limited.

375 CT with SMKs and CT Solids. I will probably switch him to Cutting Edge bullets if i can.

Using more than 125grains of powder puts the "normal" cost of just the powder at ~$0.60, bullets are from $1-2, brass at $2.5 / 5 loads for $.050 per. so you are talking $2.10 to $3.1 per shot for the 375.

Using less than 100 grains of powder puts the "normal" cost for a 338 at $0.50 + $0.80 + $.050 for $1.25 to $2.25 per shot, maybe less for a 338.

IIWM: I would recommend that your client go with a 338. Lapua, Lapua Improved (I like 35 degree instead of 40), 338 RUM, 338 RUM Improved (again 35 degrees over the stock 30). 338/300 RUM (aka Edge) and improved versions.

but

If I find out that my 24" barrel 338/26-Nosler can send that 250 at 2900fps + or that 300 at 2800fps+

then

I would say, go with a 338/26-Nosler because it will all around be easier to deal with. Lighter, it will be easy to find brass. Less recoil.
 

gnoltterrag

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I realize this is an older post, but I wanted to lean into it slightly. First, both rifles are fun, and both are an elite caliber. However, just comparing ballistic coefficients of the two demonstrate the cheytac being more elite. I own a cheytac, and have also spent a lot of time behind a lapua. As far as I am concerned a cheytac has the ability (with the same shooter) to shoot farther, be less effected by wind, and hit harder. A concern of brass and die availability is always an issue, but if you form a relationship with CheyTac, there is no need for worry. Unfortunately, my bias stems from owning one, and the fact that I hunt with it. Although a lapua delivers an incredible amount of energy, for me, I prefer to hunt with a heavier load that will prove even more devastating at ranges from 100 yards to 1200 yards. To sum, both will make you smile, but the CheyTac is a rifle that after being purchased, there will never be a question as whether or not to step up and get a bigger gun.
 

EXPRESS

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I've been thinking about this same topic with a .338 Lapua IMP on the way.

Basically it comes down to whether you will do most of tour shooting inside 1500 or beyond that.

Really there isn't as big a difference in their performance within 1000 as their is in their physical size and material components.
 
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