300 wm factory hunting ammo

tr175

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Jan 31, 2010
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147
Location
Montana
Give Barnes VOR-TX 180's a try. They usually work. They also have a VOR-TX LR 190.
 

Huggy

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Apr 15, 2017
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71
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Southern Arizona
If, after trying several different brands of factory ammo and finding your rifle doesn't like any of them, another option is to find a qualified reloading business (sometimes set up in partnership with a gunsmith) who does custom loading.
For a price (which may seem steep at the outset) they can hopefully come across a combination of projo, powder, primer, case/case trimmed length and loaded OAL, along with identifying how far off the lands your bullet likes for optimum performance in YOUR rifle.
Just understand that the process doesn't happen overnight since you (they?) are working with many variables and must find the combination that gives your rifle that Goldilocks "Just Right" result.
All that said, once there has been found an ideal (for YOUR rifle) combination, ask to get a copy of ALL the "options" used to achieve such goals.
As a reloader will oftentimes tell you, the knowing and the ability to recreate all the variables to give you as near to identical reproductions of subsequent rounds is paramount in allowing future ammo requirements to remain as close to identical as possible.
You probably already are aware that in time the throat of your barrel will gradually wear, throwing another variable into the mix and powder/primer/projo/case components will change somewhat between manufacturers lots of each, so be prepared for some occasional differences in POA/POI over time, too.
As a reloader myself, once I've identified the best (for MY guns) components and assembly data, I make it a point to buy as much powder, primers, bullets, cases as I think reasonable for my foreseeable hunting/shooting requirements.
It isn't a 100% guarantee your gun will continue to give you 1/4" 5-shot groups forever, but it'll be a good start and being able to give your ammo supplier all the data you have for them to use to recreate your ideal combination, as long as they are reputable, you'll have a source of ammo as you need it.
Just be aware that he probably won't be willing to set aside quantity lots of all the above components just for you, so each time you buy more ammo you might not get the same accuracy results.
Which is all the more reason to learn how to reload for yourself and buy the gear to build for your needs.
YOU have 100% control in what goes into each round and YOU are your own Quality Control Staff. Once you are proficient and competent, you'll be MUCH happier with the results.
And while the initial outlay for the equipment and components might seem daunting, consider that you'll be able to amortize the costs over many hundreds of rounds of ammo until the only real cost is the cost of your time to build ammo.
An additional HUGE plus is that you can use the same equipment to reload for any another guns/calibers you own and shoot, too. Just make sure to save your brass and that takes one cost factor out of the equation up to a point. That point being that all cases eventually "wear out" and will need replacing with new stock.
That amounts to even more eventual savings and peace of mind that everything is "Just Right."
Good Luck in your quest.
Overnout
 
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Huggy

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Apr 15, 2017
Messages
71
Location
Southern Arizona
My rifle just didn't like anything over the 190 mark.
DITTO! Try as I might, I couldn't get my Remington M700 Sendero to like the 190 grain ANYTHING!
Boy did the Cashola FLY out of my wallet while I tried to find factory ammo to feed it. $30.00 PLUS for a box of 20 rounds isn't an easy pill to swallow when trying several different brands of ammo.
I learned in short order that my WinMag LOVES the SGK projo's in the 180 grain weight.
ISYN (I **** You Not) when I say I found the Holy Grail with that projo and other agreeable components to five me 3/8" 5-shot groups at 100 yards all day long when I did MY part.
I use the same recipe for plinking ammo as well as hunting and have yet to be disappointed.
It's all about finding that Goldilocks recipe and sticking with what works, IMO. If it ain't broke, don't "fix" it after the fact.
 

JasonBales

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Joined
Mar 27, 2019
Messages
18
Location
Atlanta
I'm going to buy 2 kinds of Berger's and see what they do. I went back out today and had the same results. Scattered grouping. I can confidently kill a deer at 400 yards, but I want to shoot 1000 yards with this gun on paper and be sub moa up to 700 at the minimum.
 

FEENIX

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Dec 20, 2008
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Great Falls, MT
I'm going to buy 2 kinds of Berger's and see what they do. I went back out today and had the same results. Scattered grouping. I can confidently kill a deer at 400 yards, but I want to shoot 1000 yards with this gun on paper and be sub moa up to 700 at the minimum.
This is why most of us reload. Good luck!
 

Patton63

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Jan 26, 2015
Messages
67
Location
Northern VA
I have had great success with Federal Premium Trophy Copper rounds. 180 gr. They have proven very accurate out to 500 yds (the farthest I have tried them) and hit extremely hard. They’ve worked very well on African plains game and a bison here in the states. I use this round in my 308 as well and love it.
 

FEENIX

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Dec 20, 2008
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Great Falls, MT
Yeah, I may end up doing the same one day. Space and time is what is stopping me for now. But I have years of brass saved.
I hear you, most of us started the way or similar. I am fortunate to have a friend mentored me many years ago.

Because of school, time is also a challenge for me now. There are space saving reloading set-up out their in the market for you to consider. I made mine mobile, below are old pictures ...
 

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JasonBales

Member
Joined
Mar 27, 2019
Messages
18
Location
Atlanta
I have had great success with Federal Premium Trophy Copper rounds. 180 gr. They have proven very accurate out to 500 yds (the farthest I have tried them) and hit extremely hard. They’ve worked very well on African plains game and a bison here in the states. I use this round in my 308 as well and love it.
I will give that a try next if this doesn't pan out.
 

wildcat455

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Sep 13, 2017
Messages
416
Location
Black Canyon City Arizona
I don’t know guys, If I wanted to shoot 180 gr bullets, I’d be running a 30-06. I can get just below 300 Win Mag factory cartridge performance handloading for that.
Now, I’m not saying there’s anything wrong with 180 grainers, there isn’t. Matter of fact, I bought a bunch of them in Federal power shock years ago, and use them for barrel break in and coyotes, mainly to get the brass for hand loading for a particular 300 of mine that does decent with a Federal case. I also am not saying that’s all they are good for, just what I use them for.
A 180 grain bullet is adequate for most things in North America... at normal hunting ranges. Extend that range, and you’ll find yourself out performed by the heavies from the muzzle out, without a doubt in my mind. You may even find yourself searching for wounded animals.

I believe the 300 Win Mag really starts to shine at 200 grain and up.

I’ll take the retained energy at the distance the heavy for caliber bullets provide, and in the off chance I hit an animal up close, I know he’ll be DRT, not a step, and no tracking. Just mark his spot and go collect my game. Hydrostatic shock is a very convincing argument when witnessed first hand.

True statement: If you want any cartridge to really shine, you simply have to hand load.

Factory cartridges always seem to be loaded a minimum 100 FPS + LESS than the lower accuracy nodes in my rifles. Sometimes, the low node isn’t even the performance level I’m seeking with the rifle. That kinda sucks. Spend that kind of money to find out you’re still coming up short... the 215 BHT factory offering comes within 80 FPS of my lower accuracy node in the Fierce and Christensen rifles I now hunt with, which is good enough to get me about 1 MOA with them. They’ll do in a pinch, for sure. Their performance on game behind the shoulder is well documented, which happens to be my preferred aiming point. Just make sure the tips are open.

For the non handloader, to achieve handloader’s performance level with the 300 Win Mag, you’d need to be at 300 weatherby or 300 RUM, and that’s just an expen$ive propo$ition.

Makes handloading seem almost affordable when considered strictly on what you’ll be buying factory rounds for at that point. But don’t fool yourself. Guys who handload suck all that savings up in shooting more. LOL!
I know I do anyway...

The true statement of handloading is you’ll shoot more, for the same money, and you’ll shoot better ammunition. (Hopefully) haha.
 
Joined
Nov 10, 2012
Messages
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Location
Kootenays , British Columbia . Canada
I have a Sako finlite in 300WM . I do not reload . I found my best groups with the Remington corelokt . My son has same rifle in 30-06 and At 200 yds you can cover the 3 shot group with a loonie .
Start out with the cheap stuff and work you’re way up .
 

CO_Guy

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Joined
Nov 16, 2018
Messages
953
Location
CO, USA
Determine the weight that you want to shoot and try a few out. There are many excellent offerings out there and it won't be hard to find one your rifle likes.

+1 on the Federal Premiums (Nosler Partition, Trophy Copper, Trophy Bonded Tip) and don't disregard the Federal Fusion. It is very accurate in many rifles.
 

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