30-06 with Reloader 26 load data with 210 gr Berger or accubond bullets. Request please.

rammac

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This is why you should workup a load slowly, a lot of people build overpressure loads without realizing it, they use the old school process of identifying a hot load visually and it doesn't work for the modern, tight chambered rifles. Most often a person that builds a load by backing off a couple of tenths of a grain after they see "signs of pressure" end up with a load that's producing max pressures of around 70,000 PSI or more.
 

Mram10us

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This is why you should workup a load slowly, a lot of people build overpressure loads without realizing it, they use the old school process of identifying a hot load visually and it doesn't work for the modern, tight chambered rifles. Most often a person that builds a load by backing off a couple of tenths of a grain after they see "signs of pressure" end up with a load that's producing max pressures of around 70,000 PSI or more.
When you say old school, which methods are you referring to? Flattened primers? Sticky bolt lift? How do you go about identify pressure?
 

rammac

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At least it shows 100% powder burn.
Which isn't necessarily the best thing.

Most ballisticians say that if you are looking for the best precision then you want the powder to continue burning just beyond the muzzle. In other words, you want a powder burn of around 98% at the muzzle.
 

rammac

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When you say old school, which methods are you referring to? Flattened primers? Sticky bolt lift? How do you go about identify pressure?
Sticking bolt lift isn't a visual indicator but it is a reliable indicator of overpressure for your rifle.

All of the visual signs (flattening of the primers, head deformation) can be caused by physical dimension problems or surface finish issues. They can work but they aren't reliable.

Case head or extractor groove expansion is a better way to monitor pressure but it's not easy to create a repeatable measuring process.

I prefer to monitor the inside diameter of my primer pockets. It's reliable and easy to check with a gauge pin.

Of course the best way to monitor pressure is with a calibrated pressure transducer but that's more expensive than the average shooter can afford and it takes some effort to maintain and keep calibrated.
 

Vol1975

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I use 61.4 grains RL26 and a 215 primer for over 2800FPS from a 22 in Proof barrel with a 208 A-Max.


have you or anyone else found an advantage over using the 210 vs 215 primers with the 30-06 and rl 26.
my current goal is to turn an older Winchester 22 inch barrel into a more woods gun. 250 yards max but a hammer.
im going to try a sample of powder chargers starting at 58 grains and work up.
if could get 2800 out of 210 Berger’s or accubonds I’d be elated.
thanks fellas.
Was looking for a starting place With this bullet weight.
 

Mram10us

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Sticking bolt lift isn't a visual indicator but it is a reliable indicator of overpressure for your rifle.

All of the visual signs (flattening of the primers, head deformation) can be caused by physical dimension problems or surface finish issues. They can work but they aren't reliable.

Case head or extractor groove expansion is a better way to monitor pressure but it's not easy to create a repeatable measuring process.

I prefer to monitor the inside diameter of my primer pockets. It's reliable and easy to check with a gauge pin.

Of course the best way to monitor pressure is with a calibrated pressure transducer but that's more expensive than the average shooter can afford and it takes some effort to maintain and keep calibrated.
What do you do at the range during a pressure test? Pop out the primer and measure pockets? Trying to figure out what can be done during a standard powder pressure test. Primer flattening, bolt lift and ejector mark seem to be as good as one can do, but open to learn better ways.
 

TAZMAN

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Which isn't necessarily the best thing.

Most ballisticians say that if you are looking for the best precision then you want the powder to continue burning just beyond the muzzle. In other words, you want a powder burn of around 98% at the muzzle.
Are you saying I need more powder??lol
 

Dog Rocket

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Hey, you know who actually does instrumented pressure testing? Alliant does...you know, the guys that sell the powder?

They are getting just over 2,800 fps with a 215 grain Berger at max load from a 24" barrel.
They are getting just over 2,900 fps from a 200 grain Berger at max load from a 24" barrel...

From a 300 Winchester Magnum.
 

Tripodmvr7

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I did not make any comment with the Quick Load calculations that I posted. Common sense says that if 2750fps with a 30-06 (24 inch barrel) and 180gr bullets is the norm, that any heavier bullet will shoot at a lower speed. Pressure = speed and it is not linear, so extra speed means a lot of extra pressure. Read up on locking lug setback and then case life becomes the minor problem.

Buy a magnum or sneak in a bit closer if you think 210gr bullets are necessary for your prey.
 

Vol1975

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I did not make any comment with the Quick Load calculations that I posted. Common sense says that if 2750fps with a 30-06 (24 inch barrel) and 180gr bullets is the norm, that any heavier bullet will shoot at a lower speed. Pressure = speed and it is not linear, so extra speed means a lot of extra pressure. Read up on locking lug setback and then case life becomes the minor problem.

Buy a magnum or sneak in a bit closer if you think 210gr bullets are necessary for your prey.
this Gun is a very light weight, short mountain gun thats 22 inch that I’ve owned for nearly 40 years. I use it in the thick woods. In the past I’ve always just bought factory 180 grain bullets that got the job done. The gun Has a low power scope 2x7. Like I said close quick shots. I’m just Trying to just find a hand load that will work fairly good out to 200 yards Max. I like a minimum of 180 grain but have shot 200 plus grain in other 06 for this type of hunting.
most of my 180 grain loads run around 2750 to 2800. I have rl 26 in mass abundance just no published data for a 30-06 That why I was wanting maybe a starting point.

IF I can get the 180 grains to works that would be great but if I can’t the accuracy I want I’d like to give the 210 a try because I have such a ample supply of those bullets.

As far as buy a magnum, I
have plenty of magnums for open country. I don’t want to use magnums because of the length of the guns, weight, etc on shots that most of the time is 100 yard or less.
 

Tripodmvr7

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I gave you a load in the second QL calc I did, but then I used a 24 inch barrel.

With 22 inch try 56gr Re26 as a start with the 210gr bullet. Highest node speed seems to be near 2620fps.
 

Arkansasdad

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Jan 26, 2014
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My current loads are actually hotter than what I posted but what works in mine may NOT work in your rifle so I am very cautious of putting load data out there. As with all loads, work up slow and keep an eye on pressure signs along with accuracy nodes. My 30 06 seems to do great at the higher pressures. I can run the 190 Berger at 2900FPS from this 22 inch barrel. I ordered some 200.20x bullets to try and hit a happy medium on bullet weight and FPS for a long range (relative) 30 06. I have plenty of other calibers that are better for long range but the 30 06 is just a fun favorite that you can get Lapua brass for.

I've had the 208 close to 2900FPS but was concerned about brass life and extreme hot temperatures. It's fun to play with though and if it sells, someone will get a heck of a package.
Would like to know what kind of accuracy you are experiencing. 2900 seems at least 150 high for a 190 out of a 22" barrel. How much fire do you see if shot at night? Happy shooting.
 

Vol1975

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I gave you a load in the second QL calc I did, but then I used a 24 inch barrel.

With 22 inch try 56gr Re26 as a start with the 210gr bullet. Highest node speed seems to be near 2620fps.
Thanks. I will start at around 56 and go up Slowly.
 

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