280 Ackley or something more common?

SavageHunter11

Well-Known Member
Joined
Jan 17, 2017
Messages
518
Location
East River South Dakota
I would say similar, but different. The 6.5CM was marketed very well. Certain attributes where highlighted, and shortcomings weren't mentioned. It was new, it was easy to shoot, and it had a lot of long range potential without recoil. The time was right as the magnum concept was getting a little tired, and folks were ripe to be deviated from it. The low recoil appealed to the softer generation of millennial shooters. Credit spending was at an all-time high, and social media was an explosive new platform for sleek advertising.

The 280 AI has been around for a while. It had a lot to live up to when it was introduced, and I feel like it has long lived in the shadow of the 7mmRM. But while it's a skosh slower, it really is a significantly more efficient cartridge. For reloaders, it offers a marked advantage over 280 Rem. I think now that the a large portion of the shooting public is bored again, the 280 AI is getting a spotlight for what it does well, not where it falls short compared to its big brothers like it did when Magnums were the be all end all. It's getting a spotlight it couldn't at its inception.

And lets face it, unless your a die-hard short action fan, it's superior to the 6.5CM in just about every way! ;)
You're certainly not wrong. It started gaining popularity after Nosler got it SAAMI approved, they should have been advertising the heck out of it but didn't and now that you pointed that out, you're probably right in saying it won't gain the same popularity as the Creedmoor because of it. I still think it will become more common place in the next 5 years. At this time, it's really the only long-action non-magnum and 30-06 based cartridge that keeps up with the newer modern cartridges out there right now. Honestly surprised Hornady hasn't jumped in with a dedicated long-action non-magnum round yet (7mm Creedmost? 😝)
 
Last edited:

onetohunt

Well-Known Member
Joined
Jan 9, 2017
Messages
94
To begin with, I reload for the 7mm and the 280ai. It is a great way to save money and pass some time. It is not just a hobby, but a way to have ammo at the ready if I decide I want to shoot a little. I have a Remington 700 in the 7mm and a Cooper Model 92 in the 280ai. The Cooper is a great rifle and fairly light, it does have a muzzlebrake on it and in no way does it kick like the 7mm. To me they are in two different zones on recoil and I'm really not recoil shy. The 280ai will do what you need it to do and then some. Plus it is just plain fun to shoot. To me, if you have the capabilities, get the 280ai and go against the norm a little. It does have more of a WOW factor than the 7mm in my opinion. Good luck with your decision and it will ultimately come down to which will fit you and your needs better!
 

NewShooter15

Member
Joined
Jan 10, 2021
Messages
24
Location
Nevada
Tons of great info from you all! I really appreciate it and I think it will help overall, especially the reloading tips and personal experiences. I went back to the store today and the same boxes of 280ai/280rem were still on the shelves asking to be bought but not for the price offered. For now 280ai is my end goal (next few years) but will probably end up grabbing a 7mm or re-working the current .308 like mentioned before.
8599C1C5-41C4-4665-8DFC-9C878C9B8DAB.jpeg

Also this is the 280ai ammo I mentioned before. Not sure if it’s worth a **** but it’s always available here.
 

Tallest

Member
Joined
Oct 4, 2017
Messages
12
You're certainly not wrong. It started gaining popularity after Nosler got it SAAMI approved, they should have been advertising the heck out of it but didn't and now that you pointed that out, you're probably right in saying it won't gain the same popularity as the Creedmoor because of it. I still think it will become more common place in the next 5 years. At this time, it's really the only long-action non-magnum and 30-06 based cartridge that keeps up with the newer modern cartridges out there right now. Honestly surprised Hornady hasn't jumped in with a dedicated long-action non-magnum round yet (7mm Creedmost? 😝)
Give it a few months... 2021 is young. Nothing to keep a threatened industry alive like having massive influxes of cash. Don't get me wrong, I generally like Hornady as a brand. Whether I like it or not, it's to their credit that they marketed the Creedmoor so well! It will be interesting to see if they can do it again now that we're on to them.
 

seattleman1969

Well-Known Member
Joined
Oct 3, 2014
Messages
279
Location
Missoula, Mt
How long have you been reloading/was it difficult to get started with it? I don't really wanna sink a few $100 into something I'll never get any good use out of lol but at $60-$80 per box it sounds like it might be more beneficial to just drop $100's into reloading equipment.

I would argue that is not necessarily the case.

My start in reloading almost 30 years ago now was with an RCBS Rockchucker kit and a set of standard .270 Win dies to try and get a Ruger 77 Tang Safety rifle that would not shoot any factory ammo to shoot.

I simply followed all the standard recipes and every step to the letter working up from start loads in 1-2 grain increments until I found the best load. I had no experience and was self taught.

The things that worked best for me were proper case prep, weighing and re-weighing cases and powder charges, and very close attention to seating depths using a RCBS Precision Mic for .270 Win.

My first go produced a load that took that rifle from 1.75 to .5.

Read, study, pay extreme attention to detail and follow every step no matter how silly it seems. Double check everything.

Without experience or a mentor it started me off right! I would have killed for a forum like this back then...

The satisfaction that comes from creating loads that you would normally pay premium prices for at a reduced price (most of the time) and know it is tailored specifically to your rifle is a reward beyond description!
 
Last edited:

NewShooter15

Member
Joined
Jan 10, 2021
Messages
24
Location
Nevada
I would argue that is not necessarily the case.

My start in reloading almost 30 years ago now was with an RCBS Rockchucker kit and a set of standard .270 Win dies to try and get a Ruger 77 Tang Safety rifle that would not shoot any factory ammo to shoot.

I simply followed all the standard recipes and every step to the letter working up from start loads in 1-2 grain increments until I found the best load. I had no experience and was self taught.

The things that worked best for me were proper case prep, weighing and re-weighing cases and powder charges, and very close attention to seating depths using a RCBS Precision Mic for .270 Win.

My first go produced a load that took that rifle from 1.75 to .5.

Read, study, pay extreme attention to detail and follow every step no matter how silly it seems. Double check everything.

Without experience or a mentor it started me off right! I would have killed for a forum like this back then...

The satisfaction that comes from creating loads that you would normally pay premium prices for at a reduced price (most of the time) and know it is tailored specifically to your rifle is a reward beyond description!
That definitely gives me a boost in confidence. Everywhere I’ve looked so far is sold out of reloading kits and every time I’ve been around sportsman’s I don’t know that I’ve ever seen new brass in any of the calibers that have been mentioned here so far. I’ve seen some factory ammo for all of them though. Just picked up some new Hornady Outfitter 165 gr GMAX to see if my rifle likes it good enough.
 

seattleman1969

Well-Known Member
Joined
Oct 3, 2014
Messages
279
Location
Missoula, Mt
“Everywhere I’ve looked so far is sold out of reloading kits and every time I’ve been around sportsman’s I don’t know that I’ve ever seen new brass in any of the calibers that have been mentioned here so far. I’ve seen some factory ammo for all of them though. Just picked up some new Hornady Outfitter 165 gr GMAX to see if my rifle likes it good enough.”
That is everyones challenge currently...
 

Mike Matteson

Well-Known Member
Joined
Jun 26, 2017
Messages
540
This is either the third or maybe the fourth time this has happen in about the pass 20+ years. Part of the problem is the government. Their wild claims from year to year going to take your firearms away, doesn't help at all. During Obama time, he was having the different law enforemen agents purchase far more ammo than needed. For a year or so, you couldn't get a AR-15. We have idiots still in government that wants to take our firearm way. We have the 2nd, but that could become iffy. So everybody is buying up anything, and everything. That makes it very hard for reloaders to reload. Crazy people will pay way over what the items are really worth. So be it for now. Not a good time to start reloading. Nothing to work with. Like last year when T Paper could be had. I saw a garage that the door was open. It was pile high with T. P. I bet he still trying to sell it.
 

lightshooter

Well-Known Member
Joined
Apr 30, 2016
Messages
79
If you’re going to only rebarrel your current browning .308 then you have a .473 bolt face so 7 RM is out. I don’t know Browning actions but I’m assuming it’s a short action which means .280 AI is out.

Dough!

Back to square one. Maybe .284 win would fit? I thing it’s abit long for most short actions. What about 7mm-08 or .260 Rem or do I dare say it 6.5 Creedmoor 😖. I might get flamed for that one, but I think it’s a fine cartridge but way over hyped and way over hated.
 

seattleman1969

Well-Known Member
Joined
Oct 3, 2014
Messages
279
Location
Missoula, Mt
I am a .284 and .277 caliber nut. If you were going to rebarrel your .30-06 I would personally prefer .280 AI, I am going to build one soon. If rebarreling the .308 then I would prefer 7mm-08, fine cartridge that I own two of already. My wife and son both shoot it.
 

NewShooter15

Member
Joined
Jan 10, 2021
Messages
24
Location
Nevada
If you’re going to only rebarrel your current browning .308 then you have a .473 bolt face so 7 RM is out. I don’t know Browning actions but I’m assuming it’s a short action which means .280 AI is out.

Dough!

Back to square one. Maybe .284 win would fit? I thing it’s abit long for most short actions. What about 7mm-08 or .260 Rem or do I dare say it 6.5 Creedmoor 😖. I might get flamed for that one, but I think it’s a fine cartridge but way over hyped and way over hated.
I am a .284 and .277 caliber nut. If you were going to rebarrel your .30-06 I would personally prefer .280 AI, I am going to build one soon. If rebarreling the .308 then I would prefer 7mm-08, fine cartridge that I own two of already. My wife and son both shoot it.
I was definitely curious how rebarreling works and what the limitations are so thanks for the possible options. Ultimately I just can’t decide if it’s “worth it” to rebarrel, buy a new stock, etc or just purchase a $1000-$1500 factory rifle in a caliber I want over rebarreling to something that’d be cool to have. If you guys are well versed in how rebarreling works I have some specific questions about it also!
 

seattleman1969

Well-Known Member
Joined
Oct 3, 2014
Messages
279
Location
Missoula, Mt
It depends on your action and your chosen barrel manufacturer. Regardless, you either order a barrel that is chamber reamed and hopefully cut for action already the have a gunsmith install and headspace, or, order a blank in the caliber that you want and pay a gunsmith to chamber, cut, and install.

The former can be much cheaper than the latter as it is much less time for the gunsmith to perform machining work and much less room for possible error (Not that it's common for smiths to make errors, but it can happen).

Regardless, a rebarrel will cost you the same as a $100 factory rifle, but, you have a custom barrel made for your gun to your specs, and GENERALLY more accurate than a factory barrel. If you keep your old barrel you can also swap back to your old chambering with a little bit of mechanical knowledge and a go/no go gauge.
 

Primary

LRH Assistant
Here are some related products that LRH members are talking about. Clicking on a product will take you to LRH’s partner, Primary, where you can find links to LRH discussions about these products.

 
 
Top