280 Ackley or something more common?

Tallest

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Oct 4, 2017
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12
How long have you been reloading/was it difficult to get started with it? I don't really wanna sink a few $100 into something I'll never get any good use out of lol but at $60-$80 per box it sounds like it might be more beneficial to just drop $100's into reloading equipment.
I've been at it for about 4 years. It's not easy to get going and get good really fast. It requires patience. It's time consuming, and it's not inexpensive to get set up. But I definitely think it's worth it. You can tailor your ammo to your gun, which I believe allows you to get the most out of any rifle. You'll spend a lot of time reading, posting questions, and watching youtube (be careful that who you watch is worth watching!). And you'll certainly have hurdles before you hit your groove, but I would advise anyone who is planning to hunt or shoot seriously to learn to load their own ammo. If not, you need to find the best factory stuff for your gun, then buy a truck load of it. And at this juncture, that's laughable. :confused:
 

NewShooter15

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Jan 10, 2021
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I mistook "Browning AB2" as Browning A-Bolt II.

I always considered Ted Williams and Western Field budget, some might consider Browning a budget rifle, I don't.

Post a picture of it, it might not be that bad.
You are correct, it is an A-Bolt II. I posted a picture on my member introduction post but I can post again/more when I get home this afternoon.
 

25WSM

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New shooter getting into reloading is a great hobby. Best advice I can give you is find a mentor. There are so many great people at shooting ranges that love to help out new people. As far as cost is concerned just get good equipment from the start. Don’t try and buy the cheapest tools. Nothing wrong with used equipment. Rcbs rockchucker presses last many lifetimes and it’s hard to beat the old scales like the 10-10 or M5. Depending on what you load for it can pay for itself pretty fast. If you only shoot real popular rounds like 06 or 270 and such it will take longer to recoup your money but if your shooting a 30-378wby you can recoup your money in just 5 boxes or so. Hope you get it going because you will get hooked and love it. Have fun.
Shep
 

Franko21

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My vote is for 7mm RM. Both cartridges use a long action and have similar recoil. However, the RM will give you much greater choices when it comes to guns and off the shelf ammo. Also, if you are ever hunting and need to buy more ammo the RM is going to be much easier to find.
 

Tallest

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Oct 4, 2017
Messages
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New shooter getting into reloading is a great hobby. Best advice I can give you is find a mentor. There are so many great people at shooting ranges that love to help out new people. As far as cost is concerned just get good equipment from the start. Don’t try and buy the cheapest tools. Nothing wrong with used equipment. Rcbs rockchucker presses last many lifetimes and it’s hard to beat the old scales like the 10-10 or M5. Depending on what you load for it can pay for itself pretty fast. If you only shoot real popular rounds like 06 or 270 and such it will take longer to recoup your money but if your shooting a 30-378wby you can recoup your money in just 5 boxes or so. Hope you get it going because you will get hooked and love it. Have fun.
Shep

I wholeheartedly agree with this. One thing I failed to mention was that I have a co-worker who has been reloading since he was a teenager in the early 70s (at least a decade before I was born ;)). He's been one of the main reasons I was able to successfully get into reloading. It's not that you can't do it on your own, but you will find it drastically less frustrating to reap the benefits of a mentors experience.

And perhaps I majored too heavily on the difficulties and frustration. That is because I don't think it's the sort of hobby one should undertake casually or without being well qualified. But 25WSM is exactly right... It's addictive and constantly rewarding!
 

NewShooter15

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Joined
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Messages
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Location
Nevada
I've been at it for about 4 years. It's not easy to get going and get good really fast. It requires patience. It's time consuming, and it's not inexpensive to get set up. But I definitely think it's worth it. You can tailor your ammo to your gun, which I believe allows you to get the most out of any rifle. You'll spend a lot of time reading, posting questions, and watching youtube (be careful that who you watch is worth watching!). And you'll certainly have hurdles before you hit your groove, but I would advise anyone who is planning to hunt or shoot seriously to learn to load their own ammo. If not, you need to find the best factory stuff for your gun, then buy a truck load of it. And at this juncture, that's laughable. :confused:
I wholeheartedly agree with this. One thing I failed to mention was that I have a co-worker who has been reloading since he was a teenager in the early 70s (at least a decade before I was born ;)). He's been one of the main reasons I was able to successfully get into reloading. It's not that you can't do it on your own, but you will find it drastically less frustrating to reap the benefits of a mentors experience.

And perhaps I majored too heavily on the difficulties and frustration. That is because I don't think it's the sort of hobby one should undertake casually or without being well qualified. But 25WSM is exactly right... It's addictive and constantly rewarding!
Oh wow, definitely sounds like an intense hobby but also like it can be a fun one lol although it would be a more casual thing for me right now. I've just recently decided to start shooting more often so I'm don't think I'm ready to dive head first into that just yet. Especially with not knowing anyone who does currently reload to be able to lead me down the right path lol so maybe for now I'll look into the 7mm RM like others have suggested for solid factory loads
 

NewShooter15

Member
Joined
Jan 10, 2021
Messages
24
Location
Nevada
New shooter getting into reloading is a great hobby. Best advice I can give you is find a mentor. There are so many great people at shooting ranges that love to help out new people. As far as cost is concerned just get good equipment from the start. Don’t try and buy the cheapest tools. Nothing wrong with used equipment. Rcbs rockchucker presses last many lifetimes and it’s hard to beat the old scales like the 10-10 or M5. Depending on what you load for it can pay for itself pretty fast. If you only shoot real popular rounds like 06 or 270 and such it will take longer to recoup your money but if your shooting a 30-378wby you can recoup your money in just 5 boxes or so. Hope you get it going because you will get hooked and love it. Have fun.
Shep
Shep, thank you for the information. Seems like when I decide to take that dive (hopefully soon-ish if I can find equipment for the right price) it will be very good to have this in my back pocket. I was actually looking at rcbs yesterday from one of the beginner or FAQ forums.
 

Tallest

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Joined
Oct 4, 2017
Messages
12
Oh wow, definitely sounds like an intense hobby but also like it can be a fun one lol although it would be a more casual thing for me right now. I've just recently decided to start shooting more often so I'm don't think I'm ready to dive head first into that just yet. Especially with not knowing anyone who does currently reload to be able to lead me down the right path lol so maybe for now I'll look into the 7mm RM like others have suggested for solid factory loads
Not necessarily a bad plan. But these are unique days. Finding factory ammo for anything is going to be a long shot for a while. For example: Today, Midway has 10 SKUs of 280 AI Ammunition that they keep in stock barring crazy times. They have one of those currently available in stock. They also have 67 SKUs for 7mm Rem Mag. They have 0 available in stock. Demand for higher selling items will remain higher longer, is my guess. Just a thought...
 

NewShooter15

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Joined
Jan 10, 2021
Messages
24
Location
Nevada
My vote is for 7mm RM. Both cartridges use a long action and have similar recoil. However, the RM will give you much greater choices when it comes to guns and off the shelf ammo. Also, if you are ever hunting and need to buy more ammo the RM is going to be much easier to find.
I think you guys are pushing me to the 7mm RM. If recoil is that close Idk that it's worth it (at this time) to to go with a cartridge less readily available. Thanks for your input!
 

NewShooter15

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Joined
Jan 10, 2021
Messages
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Location
Nevada
Not necessarily a bad plan. But these are unique days. Finding factory ammo for anything is going to be a long shot for a while. For example: Today, Midway has 10 SKUs of 280 AI Ammunition that they keep in stock barring crazy times. They have one of those currently available in stock. They also have 67 SKUs for 7mm Rem Mag. They have 0 available in stock. Demand for higher selling items will remain higher longer, is my guess. Just a thought...
That's also a really good point. I just know in the current market in Nevada, I see decent amounts, for the current time, of 7mm RM and 280AI (3 SKUs 1-2 boxes each). You guys are all making good points and that makes it harder lol
 

Axl

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Apr 15, 2015
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I think you guys are pushing me to the 7mm RM. If recoil is that close Idk that it's worth it (at this time) to to go with a cartridge less readily available. Thanks for your input!
Here is a recoil calculator from this site. Recoil is physics. Say if you have an 8# rifle and a 160 grain bullet going 3000 fps the recoil will be nearly the same no matter the cartridge.
 

GSP814

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Oct 23, 2015
Messages
267
Location
Pennsylvania
I have a LAW 280 AI, it shoots Nosler Trophy Grade 140 grain Accubonds and Hornady Precision 162 EXD-X's into very small groups. The Nosler factory ammo can get pricey.
 

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