257 Weatherby case sizing

Philward

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When resizing the Weatherby cases should we be bumping shoulder 0.002" as we do for other non radiused shoulder cases or should we be handling this differently? I have some once fired cases and some several times fired ones and 1.5 boxes of new ones and I'm wondering about that. I haven't really did that before since I only recently started measuring the shoulder bump. Maybe I should just anneal and necksize?
 

Philward

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No on some, but they were shot with a hot load. They are also 5+ years old and been reloaded 3+ times. Checked dimensions everywhere and compared to the once fired ones that close in rifle no real difference. 2.118 to datum line for once fired and 2.120 for the older ones but when I sized them to 2.117 they still won't close in chamber without stiff resistance. Case head diameter is 3.5 thou bigger than new cases but above the belt is the same for once fired and the multiple fired ones. They are trimmed to 2.536 so not too long, once fired ones are unsized yet and 2.541 and they close in gun just fine.
 

PddPdd

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My thought is annealing may give you a more completely (smaller) resized brass due to less spring-back. Whether this solves the problem, I can't say. I would try it with one piece of brass and see how it chambers. Hopefully someone with more experience with Weatherby brass will join the conversation.

How are you measuring shoulder bump? Hornady case gauge size C or D?

You might benefit from this persons experience:


or this one:

https://www.longrangeonly.com/forum/threads/257-weatherby-shoulder-trouble.1250/
 
Last edited:

Philward

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I read 2 or 3 other threads here about that, some just said neck size. I have the Hornady headspace tool that fits on calipers, used the 375 size. A note on Hornady packaging said for weatherby cartridges measure to a mid point between the radii, so I measured the difference between neck and case outside diameters and, subtracted, divide result by 2 and added result to the neck diameter. 0.391 was the result so the 400 tool might have been better. Talking with a guy here at work and I'm wondering if the distance from case head to top of belt is stretched from the hot loads, seems likely and I didn't measure that. All those cases are tossed in the recycle bucket anyway. The cases I shoot with 110 accubonds are good and all the once fired are good.
 

Dr. Vette

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I have resized thousands of Weatherby brass. Of note, I have also been annealing for years and anneal after every firing.

You can use a comparator like Hornady's or Forster's to measure the shoulder bump just the same as any other bottleneck (traditional) rifle brass. Hornady recommends the 0.420 or size E for Weatherby cases. You can make the size D work as well for the 257 Wby, but whatever you do be consistent.
I recently purchased the Forster Datum Dial, and find it a bit better for measuring the shoulder bump but the Hornady unit easier for measuring base-to-ogive length as it's a bit smoother. Of note, both end up with extremely similar measurements so don't feel like you need both systems.

The only time I use the Willis body die is when taking brass from rifle X and moving it to rifle Y. Generally you don't need to use it if the brass stays with the same rifle. Keeping brass with the same rifle is more important with belted magnums than with non-belted brass in my experience.
 

sailorjim

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When resizing the Weatherby cases should we be bumping shoulder 0.002" as we do for other non radiused shoulder cases or should we be handling this differently? I have some once fired cases and some several times fired ones and 1.5 boxes of new ones and I'm wondering about that. I haven't really did that before since I only recently started measuring the shoulder bump. Maybe I should just anneal and necksize?
Anneal and bump the shoulder.
 

Seabeeken

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The only time I use the Willis body die is when taking brass from rifle X and moving it to rifle Y. Generally you don't need to use it if the brass stays with the same rifle. Keeping brass with the same rifle is more important with belted magnums than with non-belted brass in my experience.
I had a 7RM that would get tight enough in front of the belt that they would not chamber after a few reloads. It needed a Willis die but it was in the 1970's and I had never heard of the Willis
 

cantfixstupid

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You may have a bulge above the belt since the dies can't get down far enough.
Larry Willis collet die will clean them up.

What Andew Massi said:
If you run hot loads which is why you buy a Weatherby in the first place, the Larry Willis die is a must have item, I run it after each firing in 257Bee and 300Bee and I use the Redding modified shell holder and bump them back .002. You have to run a regular full length die them run the Willis collet die I chamber check them after that or you can utilize a case gauge that is set to the head space length that your chamber likes. I very seldom have to run em back through the full length sizing die to get the .002 bump. I have up to 11 reloads on some of my brass.
 

Lee7588

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Jun 25, 2022
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Florida
When resizing the Weatherby cases should we be bumping shoulder 0.002" as we do for other non radiused shoulder cases or should we be handling this differently? I have some once fired cases and some several times fired ones and 1.5 boxes of new ones and I'm wondering about that. I haven't really did that before since I only recently started measuring the shoulder bump. Maybe I should just anneal and necksize?
I personally only anneal and neck size. They fireform in the chamber and are perfect for that gun
 

VenatusDominus

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I reload for my Weatherby 300 and have had no issues with stiff bolt closure. I removed the ejector spring and firing pin from the bolt and then determined what the comparator measurement (Hornady Cartridge Headspace
Gauge Bushing E 420 Diameter) was needed to smoothly close the bolt. I always anneal, bump the shoulder with a Redding Body Die and the Redding Competition Shell Holders Set #6 and then neck size with the Lee Collet Neck Sizer Die. So far have 4 loading out of my Remington brass, with a few loose primer pockets. I have some Peterson brass on backorder and hoping it will last longer.
 

Window

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Feb 12, 2015
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When resizing the Weatherby cases should we be bumping shoulder 0.002" as we do for other non radiused shoulder cases or should we be handling this differently? I have some once fired cases and some several times fired ones and 1.5 boxes of new ones and I'm wondering about that. I haven't really did that before since I only recently started measuring the shoulder bump. Maybe I should just anneal and necksize?
When resizing the Weatherby cases should we be bumping shoulder 0.002" as we do for other non radiused shoulder cases or should we be handling this differently? I have some once fired cases and some several times fired ones and 1.5 boxes of new ones and I'm wondering about that. I haven't really did that before since I only recently started measuring the shoulder bump. Maybe I should just anneal and necksize?
Make sure you can measure the shoulder bump accurately and .002 is plenty. Anneal every time and you’ll be pleased with the longevity of your brass. If you get the dreaded bulge, the Larry Willis die would solve that issue according to several good people here although I’ve never used one. I’ve run the .002 bump in all my Weatherby’s for years and get exceptional brass life and consistency without worrying about case head separation. Occasionally, after 8 or nine firings, I’ll get loose primer pockets and at that point, I toss them.

Good luck.
 

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