1st Elk hunt in Montana.

FlGunner

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So I'm going on my first elk hunt during the Montana rifle season. I'll be hunting with Cody Carr the last weekend of October through the first week of November. I've been to Montana once before in 2008 deer hunting in Ft Peck. What I'm trying to figure out is what to dress for knowing that weather can change very fast. I don't remember the temp feeingl very cold when I was out there last time. I just remember it being lows in the single digits and teens with highs around 30°. I remember being over dressed mostly. So my question is what kind of clothing are you guys wearing when hiking and moving. I heard about Sitka and Kuiu but no one in my area has anything like that on the shelf. I was wanting whatever I buy to work for me elsewhere as well. I hunt Ohio every year and know what cold is, just used to sitting through it, not stopping and going and bring on the move. Just don't know the quality of these clothes. Or is it I will be fine with what I already got as long as I layer correctly? I appreciate any advice you guys got.
 

FlGunner

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What I normally wear in Ohio if a set of thermals top and bottom ( the tight fitting stretchy under armour sort of material) and a full set of SentLok savanna.... Pants, long sleeve camo shirt, and zip up savanna jacket. I have 6 full sets that I wear bow hunting in Ohio. This is all I wear to get to and from stand. I do use a heater body suit while sitting. I find it very comfortable getting to stand. Most walks are 1/2-3/4 mile walk with a climber or lock on with quick sticks plus the heater body suit and bow. I don't really break a sweat and don't get cold while moving. I know though that when I'm in Montana I'm gonna be sitting and glassing and also on the go. So could what I have work in conjunction with a heavier parka while sitting and glassing or do I need to do another system. Just looking for input from you guys who have hunted there....I know it's generally a dryer cold than say the Ohio weather and what we see here in Florida (20°-30° here is a real B*#$" with all of our humidity lol).
 

FEENIX

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I am probably the wrong person to be giving advice on warm clothing for a MT hunt because I earned the nickname "Eskimo Ed" from my hunting buddies, L:cool:L. Montana weather (cold wind and snow) can be unpredictable and brutal. My advice is layering of breathable clothing (wind resistant and waterproof). Keep your toes, hands, and head warm and dry and you'll be more comfortable. You do not want to sweat when it is cold. When you're on the move walking/on a hike to your hunting spot, wear the lightest clothing set-up and layer up as required when you get to your spot. Pay attention to what your body is telling you as you layer up/down - peel before you sweat and put on before you get too cold. Wool is hard to beat, they retain heat even when wet. Heating packs are handy. Proper food (PBJ is my go to snack) and and keeping hydrated will keep you warm. Physical conditioning is often overlooked but extremely important in my opinion.
You are correct, the sitting/glassing part is going be the most challenging, I think what you have might be OK. Good luck and happy safe hunting.

Ed
 

FlGunner

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Thanks,
I am probably the wrong person to be giving advice on warm clothing for a MT hunt because I earned the nickname "Eskimo Ed" from my hunting buddies, L:cool:L. Montana weather (cold wind and snow) can be unpredictable and brutal. My advice is layering of breathable clothing (wind resistant and waterproof). Keep your toes, hands, and head warm and dry and you'll be more comfortable. You do not want to sweat when it is cold. When you're on the move walking/on a hike to your hunting spot, wear the lightest clothing set-up and layer up as required when you get to your spot. Pay attention to what your body is telling you as you layer up/down - peel before you sweat and put on before you get too cold. Wool is hard to beat, they retain heat even when wet. Heating packs are handy. Proper food (PBJ is my go to snack) and and keeping hydrated will keep you warm. Physical conditioning is often overlooked but extremely important in my opinion.
You are correct, the sitting/glassing part is going be the most challenging, I think what you have might be OK. Good luck and happy safe hunting.

Ed
I'll look into wool socks and layers. Thank you for the advice. Yeah I've been running 10 mile stretches for a while and my hunting partner just ran the Boston Marathon, So I think we'll be good. Actually looking into getting an attitude mask to simulate the thinner air.
 

GSP814

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A couple of friends of mine have hunted with Cody Carr, from what they said, dress light and prepare to do a lot of walking with a lot of it straight up!
 

FlGunner

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A couple of friends of mine have hunted with Cody Carr, from what they said, dress light and prepare to do a lot of walking with a lot of it straight up!
Yeah he said be ready for 10-12 miles a day easily.... So I'm trying to get ready on my conditioning . I'm hoping for a trip of a lifetime. I've got a 5 year old son who I'm planning on spending the next several years with hunting locally mostly and making sure he has every opportunity to enjoy this gift of the outdoors that God has given us and to try and instill some good foundational principles. So I'm wanting to make the most of this trip.
 

FEENIX

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Thanks,

I'll look into wool socks and layers. Thank you for the advice. Yeah I've been running 10 mile stretches for a while and my hunting partner just ran the Boston Marathon, So I think we'll be good. Actually looking into getting an attitude mask to simulate the thinner air.
Good on you! You're way ahead than most hunters I know.
 

Mountain Sloth

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In late October early November it could also be warmer than you expect.. Last season it was unusually warm for us in some parts of the state. What part of the state you hunt and the terrain will change what you wear. I dress and layer differently when I'm hunting open farm lands vs climbing up mountains.
 

GSP814

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Gunner--I think with all the running you guys do you will be fine. Most guys show up overweight and not in good shape. I think you will see this when out at Cody's.
 
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dress in layers and you will be fine. I have been there when it is less than 0 in the morning to around 40 in the morning, just never know. you will have a backpack I presume, so just dress in layers and stuff in your pack as you warm up during the day. main thing as you said, be in shape. if you are in shape, and the weather cooperates (a little snow) you will get your elk. have fun
 

Knuckleballz

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I think conditoning for Montana mountain hunting is best simulated for us flat landers by finding a tall building and walking all the way up and down the stairs(like 10 stories or more) several times a week. Running is ok for stamina but climbing mountain slopes uses a whole different group of muscles differently in my opinion. Getting out there to adjust to the altitude is a consideration also before exertion. Clothes that don't absorb moisture are important to staying warm and dry. Several layers can be in the backpack including wind/rain proof layer. Start out your hike being underdressed and avoid getting sweaty. Make sure you have a good pair of boots that have good traction in the snow and are comfortable(break them in beforehand)
 

Knuckleballz

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Gators and adjustable trekking poles are really nice to have also. you never know what slippery rock, or bark stripped wood is under the snow. Especially when navigating through beetle kill dead fall areas. Wet wood without bark is incredibly slippery and a good way to ruin a hunt with injuries.
 

lilharcher

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Anyone care to share their experience while hunting with Cody? I have talked with him a few times at various hunting shows......very nice guy and seems very knowledgeable. For those that have hunted with him, how was your overall experience? Did they put you on animals? Thanks!
 

FlGunner

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Anyone care to share their experience while hunting with Cody? I have talked with him a few times at various hunting shows......very nice guy and seems very knowledgeable. For those that have hunted with him, how was your overall experience? Did they put you on animals? Thanks!
What sold me on him was the fact that I actually asked other outfitters about different ones as to why I should go with their outfitting service versus a different one and none had anything negative to say about Cody other than he was booked up and it's be hard to get in with him (I've been booked for 2 years as that was his only rifle opening at the time). Probably not the best way to go about it but I wanted an outfitter to really make me feel like they wanted to take me not just sale me a hunt. He's even called to check on me and asked about my conditioning and what not. So I'm looking forward to the experience.
 

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